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ST. MARY'S CALENDAR, 1917-18 

OCTOBER-DECEMBER 



September 20, Thursday: 
September 22, Saturday: 



October 3, 


Wednesday 


October 4, 


Thursday: 


October 6, 


Saturday: 


October 13, 


Saturday: 


October 16-17: 




October 20, 


Saturday: 


October 27, 


Saturday: 


October 29, 


Monday: 


October 29, 


Monday: 


October 31, 


Wednesday 


November 1, 


Thursday : 


November 3, 


Saturday: 


November 10, 


Saturday: 


November 15, 


Thursday: 


November 17, 


Saturday: 


November 24, 


Saturday: 


November 29, 


Thursday: 


December 3, 


Monday: 


December 8, 


Saturday: 


December 15, 


Saturday: 


December 19, 


Wednesday: 


December 20, 


Thursday: 



Session regularly opened. 

Reception of Old Girls to the New Girls. In the 
Parlor, 8 p. m. 

Faculty Reception to guests of the city in honor 
of Miss Hester. Parlor. 4-6 p. m. 

Mrs. "Vaughn addressed Student Body. 7 p. m. 

Mrs. Vaughn addressed Student Body. 4 p. m. 

Party given by Athletic Associations in the Gym- 
nasium. 8 p. m. 

State Fair. Holidays. 

Muse Party. Muse Room. 8 p. m. 

Literary Society Reception. Parlor. 8 p. m. 

First Faculty Recital. Auditorium. 8:15 p.m. 

First "Pay Day." 

Hallowe'en Party. Gymnasium. 8 p. m. 

Founders' Day. Holiday. 

Class Parties. 

Muse Club Entertainment. "Circus." Gym- 
nasium. 8 p. m. 

Elocution Recital. 

Lucy Bratton Chapter in "Ma Sweet and Her 
Girls." 

St. Margaret's Chapter. Military Ball. Benefit 
of the Red Cross. 

Thanksgiving Day. Holiday. 

Second "Pay Day." 

The Dramatic Club in "A Bachelor's Romance." 

Operetta. 

Christmas Entertainment. 

Christmas Vacation begins. 



The St. Mary's Muse 

FALL NUMBER 



Vol. XXII October-November, 1917 ^o. 2-3 

O God, Holy Ghost, Sanctifier of the faithful, visit, we pray Thee, this 
School with Thy love and favor; enlighten our minds more and more with 
the light of the everlasting Gospel; graft in our hearts a love of the truth; 
increase in us true religion; nourish us with all goodness; and of Thy great 
mercy keep us in the same, blessed Spirit, whom, with the Father and the 
Son, together, we worship and glorify as one God, world without end. Amen. 



Almighty Father, whose mercy is over all Thy works, bless, we beseech Thee, 
with Thy providential care St. Mary's School and all schools and colleges of 
Christian education, and prosper all right efforts for their support. Help us 
in the work being done for the improvement and endowment of this School, 
to pray earnestly, to labor diligently, and to give generously. Grant to the 
teachers and the taught the light of Thy Holy Spirit to lead them into all 
truth and to build them up in Christian grace and character: for the sake of 
Thy Kingdom and the honor of Thy name, through Jesus Christ, our Lord. 
Amen. 

Alma Mater 

(Tune: "Believe Me, if All Those Endearing Young Charms.") 

St. Mary's! wherever thy daughters may be 

They love thy high praises to sing. 
And tell of thy beauties of campus and tree, 

Around which sweet memories cling; 
They may wander afar, out of reach of thy name. 

Afar, out of sight of thy grove. 
But the thought of St. Mary's aye kindles a flame 

Of sweet recollections and love. 

Beloved St. Mary's! how great is our debt! 

Thou hast cared for thy daughters full well; 
They can never thy happy instructions forget. 

Nor fail of thy virtues to tell. 
The love that they feel is a heritage pure; 

An experience wholesome and sweet. 
Through fast rolling years it will grow and endure; 

Be a lamp and a guide to their feet. 

May the future unite all the good of thy past 

With the best that new knowledge can bring. 
Ever onward and upward thy course! To the last 

Be thou steadfast in every good thing. 
Generations to come may thy fair daughters still 

Fondly think on thy halls and thy grove 
And carry thy teachings — o'er woodland and hill— 

Of earnestness, wisdom, and love. jj. E. H. 1905. 



14144 



The St. Mary's Muse 



The Seventy-Sixth Opening of St. Mary's 

Witli the Chapel service on the morning of Tuesday, September 
20th, the seventy-sixth session of St. Mary's formally opened. Assist- 
ing the Kector in the service were Bishop Cheshire, the President of 
the Trustees, who spoke a brief welcome, Rev. Francis M. Osborne, the 
special representative of the Trustees in charge of the campaign for 
the endowment, Rev. J. E. Ingle and Rev. M. A. Barber of the Board 
of Trustees, and Rev. C. A. Ashby, Rector of the Church of the Good 
Shepherd. 

The Bishop's address was helpful and encouraging, a brief welcom- 
ing of friends, old and new, with good sound advice to all. 

Mr. Owen, just assuming his duties as Director of the Music De- 
partment, was at the organ. The music was unusually full and strong, 
and altogether the service gave an inspiring start to what all hope is 
to prove a prosperous, happy, and healthful year. 

As usual in recent years, the preliminaries were well out of the way 
before time for the regular opening, so that when the procession 
marched from the Chapel to the Schoolroom for the opening announce- 
ments it was only necessary to have the matriculation cards signed and 
hear the schedule announcements, and all were ready for work. The 
Rector spoke only a few words, emphasizing the point which he has 
impressed on previous occasions, that the one way to begin is to begin. 

The attendance at most of the girls' schools this season is decidedly 
good, and that at St. Mary's is no exception. Practically the entire 
number of girls was on hand at the very beginning. The new girls 
arrived and were classified and settled on Tuesday and Wednesday 
and the old girls poured in on Wednesday. On Thursday morning- 
one hundred and fifty-nine of the one hundred and sixty girls enrolled 
as resident students were on hand, and the missing one was delayed 
only a day or two by sickness. 

The features of the opening to the old girls were the interest in 
Miss Hester, the incoming Lady Principal, and the change in the 
parlor. Miss Hester received a warm welcome and made a most 
pleasant impression on every one ; though Miss Thomas was and is not 



The St. Mary's Muse 



forgotten. The new hardwood floor of the parlor and hall with the 
new furniture add greatly to the attractiveness of that very important 
part of Main Building. 

The Faculty is composed in most part of old friends. Miss Hester 
takes Miss Thomas's place in English, Mrs. Marriott as Housekeeper 
succeeds Miss Lil. Fenner, of whom all thought so highly, and Miss 
Agnes Barton returns to St. Mary's, after an absence of two years 
spent at the University at Chapel Hill, to win as warm a place in our 
regard as teacher as she established for herself in her student dsLjs. 

The girls are for the most part very much as St. Mary's girls of 
yore, though we do hear some of the older friends remark that on 
short acquaintance they promise even unusually well. 

The geographical distribution of the girls is also about as usual. 
Florida and Alabama show an increase, and there are the usual scat- 
tering number from 'New England to Louisiana, but none this year 
west of the Mississippi. About one hundred of the resident students 
are from ISTorth Carolina, and Virginia, South Carolina, and Georgia 
furnish the greater part of the remainder. 

Eleven younger sisters have followed one or more of their older 
sisters as St. Mary's girls, and there is the usual number who are fol- 
lowing in the footsteps of their mothers and grandmothers in their 
St. Mary's days. 

Tf)e Literary Societies Ta^e a DefiQite Sbare in the Muse 

The Muse has always been made up of three major elements : (1) 
the stories, essays, and verse contributions of the students — occupying, 
on account of limitations of space, a less prominent part than in most 
other school and college magazines; (2) the news of the School and 
the School events, giving a permanent record of the major happenings 
in the St. Mary's life and serving to keep the old girls posted with 
regard to things at their Alma Mater ; and (3) the news of the Alumnpe 
and news of special interest to them, serving to keep them posted about 
each other and to keep the present students posted about them and 
their connection with St. Mary's. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



The Editors have heretofore looked after all three of these depart- 
ments of The Muse, but in order to further stimulate the work of the 
literary societies and give them a special interest in The Muse publi- 
cation, while, perchance, also improving the quality of this literary 
section, the Muse Club has offered to the literary societies, and the 
societies have accepted, the full responsibility for the literary section. 

The two societies — the Sigma Lambda and the Epsilon Alpha Pi — 
will furnish this section in turn, and it will be published as heretofore 
in the forepart of The Muse. With this number the Sigma Lambda 
Society makes its bow to Muse readers, and the Epsilon Alpha Pi will 
have charge of the contributions in the Christmas number. 

Let us hope that the plan will be successful in every way and helpful 
to The Muse and to the literary societies. 



When the War Will End 

Absolute knowledge have I none, 

But my aunt's washerwoman's sister's son 

Heard a policeman on his beat 

Say to a laborer on the street 

That he had a letter just last week, 

Written in the finest Greek, 

From a Chinese coolie in Timbuctoo, 

Who said that the niggers in Cuba knew 

Of a colored man in a Texas town 

Who got it straight from a circus clown 

That a man in the Klondike had the news 

From a gang of South American Jews 

About somebody in Borneo 

Who heard of a man who claimed to know 

Of a swell society female rake, 

Whose mother-in-law will undertake 

To prove that her husband's sister's niece 

Had stated in a printed piece 

That she has a son who has a friend 

Who knows when the war is going to end. 

— Exchange. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



LITERARY DEPARTMENT 



Edited hij the Sigma Lambda Literary Society 



Makian Drane, '18 ~| 

Katharine Parker Draxe, '17 j 



Editors 



The flutumn Trail 

Adeline E. Hughes, '17 

There's a tang in the very golden air 

That calls "Come away" today, 
The voice of the wind has a gypsy lilt, 
The very birds set their wings a-tilt 

And soar up, high, away! 

There's a path o'er the sunny hill, dear lass; 

Come, answer its gypsy charm. 
Its robes are of purple, and gold and red. 
I'll whisper what the wind just said; 

'Twill keep you from all harm. 

Then let's wander and roam away, dear lass, 

Led on by a gypsy trail, 
From high crown of hills to splashing falls — 
Where'er the lure of the wild wind calls, 

'Til the sun's light gently fail. 

Then we'll back o'er the whisp'ring hill, my lass, 
When the heavens are blushing far, 

And clear through the scarlet and gold and red 

Of rustling autumn leaves o'erhead 
There glows the evening star. 

But when we've left our gypsy trail, 

And the sun has dropped away. 
We'll look for a light in a window far. 
'Tis home, with doors for us ajar, 

We'll seek at close of day. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



The First New England ThaoKsgiviQg Day 

Virginia Lenoir, '21 (Bus.) 

Thanksgiving was originally neither a ]^ew England festival nor a 
Puritan holiday. 

The Pilgrims were not even the first to observe Thanksgiving Day 
in Kew England, for the Popham colonists of Mohegan were the first 
ones who used the Thanksgiving Service of the Church of England in 
this country. 

This custom was not kept in 'New England, however, until the 
Puritans, contrary to their beliefs and hatred of the customs of the 
Church of England, appointed a Day of Thanksgiving. But this day 
was a day of recreation rather than one of religious observance. 

After having labored so faithfully in building homes and preparing 
for the winter, the men spent a whole week before Thanksgiving Day 
in killing wild game. So when Thanksgiving Day came we can feel 
sure that they had wild turkey. 

Ever since our forefathers feasted on turkey on Thanksgiving Day 
we have kept up the custom, for our last Thursday in I^ovember seems 
incomplete without "the bird of Thanksgiving" on the table. So that 
the very name "turkey" suggests Thanksgiving Day, especially the 
first day that was kept in celebration of the Pilgrims' gratitude and 
praise. 

That particular day in autumn was one to be remembered. As it 
has been said before, this was a day of recreation. The exciting com- 
petitions in jumping, leaping, and running were interesting for the 
men, while the fairer sex enjoyed preparing the feast for the day. 
The partakers in this dinner were the four women of the colony, fifty- 
five Englishmen, and ninety sociable Indian visitors. These Indians 
not only entered into the games, but joined fraternally in providing 
for the feast. 

Besides the sports, the feast itself was an interesting part of the 
celebr-ation. The turkeys and deer were roasted over a large bonfire 
in the open air. While potatoes were roasted in the hot ashes the 
coffee bubbled in the huge coffee-pots that steamed above the coals. 



The St. Maey's Muse 



Besides this, on the tables there was an attractive display of vegetables, 
pickles, cookies, pumpkin pies, custards, apples, nuts, and veine. These 
surprises v^ere especially enjoyed by the Indians, who were accus- 
tomed to coarse foods, such as corn-meal, porridge, and wild game. 

The apparel of the company was appropriate to the day of fes- 
tivity. The great company of Indians, gay in holiday paint, feathers 
and furs, vividly appeals to us. Also the Pilgrim fathers in knee 
breeches, bright waistcoats, and gray hose formed a keen contrast to 
the simplicity of the Pilgrim women's costumes of plain gowns, white 
cuffs and kerchiefs. 

When the day of rejoicing was over the Indians returned to their 
respective villages highly praising their new neighbors, while the 
colonists still offered their silent praise until the shades of night 
were drawn over the scene. Thus ended the first Thanksgiving Day 
in New England. 



On Tf^aoKsgiviog Day 

Elspeth Askew, '19 

All day long Mrs. Wharton had been busy with her cooking, for 
tomorrow was Thanksgiving Day. Cakes and pies had gone into the 
oven, coming out a delicious brown, and turkey nicely roasted was 
waiting the carver's hand. From the cellar she had brought up her 
very best pickles, and everything was in readiness for the coming 
morning. 

Silently through the day Mrs. Wharton's tears had fallen, for 
Billy, her only son, the pride and joy, the worry and trouble of her 
life, was away. He had answered his country's call and, following 
in his father's footsteps, was now lieutenant in the 22d Regiment of 
Coast Artillery. 

"Lieutenant William Wharton." My! how wonderful it looked 
when she had first written it on the back of an envelope ! 

As she sat for a few minutes before the bright fire visions of a little 
brown-eyed boy passed before her eyes, and swiftly she recalled the 
incidents of his life that had meant so much to her. His first party, 



The St. Maky's Muse 



his first sweetheart, through high school she followed him, his numer- 
ous escapades, his first love. She smiled as the remembrance of his 
bashfulness came to her. Through college he had gone, and it was 
during the holidays of his senior year that "it" had happened. 

"It" was Dorothy, a fair lovely girl whose soft blue eyes and grace- 
ful manners had won the hearts of Mr. and Mrs. Wharton. Her 
parents had moved to C. after Billy had left for his last college year. 
His mother had written him about Dorothy's coming, but it had not 
interested him, for his mind was on his studies. 

In the meantime Dorothy was fast becoming a favorite not only 
with the girls, but with the older men and women. To the young 
men of the town she was ever a source of surprises, ll^ever before had 
they seen such a combination of attractions. How well she could 
play the piano ! How wonderfully she could dance ! And what an 
interesting girl ! 

In the long months of fall and winter she had seen a great deal of 
Billy's mother and father, and had learned to love them devotedly. 
She had heard them speak of Billy so often she felt as if she knew 
him, and could not help wondering what he really was. 

Christmas came, and with it Mr. William Wharton. It was at 
the Christmas dance they had met. Billy, surrounded by a score of 
friends, was telling a joke on himself causing a great deal of merri- 
ment. Just as the laugh was over he noticed a tall girl in a dress of 
blue and silver, dancing with Tom Anderson. 

"Who is the girl in blue, dancing with Tom ?" he asked. 

Everybody laughed and one of his friends said: "We knew it! 
Old boy, go on in and try for her; she is worth it!" 

At this moment one of the girls called Billy and introduced him 
to Dorothy. 

"May I have this dance, Miss Brown ?" he asked in a formal tone. 

She assented, but Billy did not dance with her long, for others 
claimed her attention. His eyes followed her wherever she went, 
however. He did not have a chance to dance with her again until the 
last dance, and he asked if he might call the next night. And so it 
be^an. 



The St. Maky's Muse 9 

He and Tom Anderson were truly rivals through the holidays, for 
Billy immediately "fell" for Dorothy, and as Tom had been very nice 
to her before he came, Billy began to think he did not ''have a chance." 

It was not until the last night, when Billy came to see her, that 
matters reached a climax, and Billy asked her. 

Glancing up at his frank, open countenance, Dorothy suddenly 
realized that she loved this tall handsome man, and she answered 
"yes." 

Through the following months they had written each other, and 
in the spring Dorothy had gone with his parents to the finals. She 
was as proud of Billy as were his parents, and needless to say she was 
the most popular girl at the dances. 

They decided to marry in August, and it was in June that Billy 
had gone to Fort C, leaving behind a very devoted little girl. 

It was now the day before Thanksgiving, and for a month no word 
had come from Billy. Dorothy tried in every way to cheer up Mr. 
and Mrs. Wharton. 

Just at this moment Dorothy went into the room as Mrs. Wharton 
brushed away her tears and realized how the time had gone. They 
talked about Billy for a long time, and Dorothy, after promising to 
come back for Thanksgiving dinner with them, went home with a 
heavy heart. 

What if she never saw Billy again! Why, oh, why had he not 
written ? 

In the morning she went over to Mrs. Wharton's, and although each 
had something to be thankful for, yet something was amiss — and it 
was Billy, of course. 

Mr. Wharton had asked the blessing and was carving the turkey 
when a startled cry from Dorothy caused him to drop the knife. At 
the door stood Billy ! 

In his lieutenant's uniform he had never looked handsomer. 

"Mother! Father! Dorothy!" he cried in one breath. 

A leave of absence had been granted him for two days before leav- 
ing for France, and he had arrived just in time for Thanksgiving 
dinner. 



10 The St. Mary's Muse 

"Why have you not written us, Billy V Dorothy asked ; and he 
explained that he had not been allowed to write any letters on account 
of the uncertainty of their departure. 

Those last moments were precious ones, and when Billy left he 
took with him a vision of a lovely little girl bravely wiping away her 
tears and throwing kisses to him. 



» 



A War=.Time ThanK.sgiving 

Lucy London Anderson, '20 

On JSTovember 28, 1917, orders were received by the American 
troops in France to advance to the fighting front immediately. For 
several months they had been encamped near Bordeaux, where they 
had been in training to better fit them for service in the trenches. In 
a few hours after the order had come Uncle Sam's soldiers were on 
their way to face the Germans. 

To those who return from France that trip will never be forgotten. 
The weather was fine and evidences of winter could be felt in the cool 
snappy air. To hear the joking and laughter that went on among the 
soldiers one would never have guessed their destination. All along 
the way they were received with cheering and applause. At several 
stops coffee was served and they always found chances to smile at the 
pretty French girls who served the coffee. 

In box car 'No. 18 the men seemed to be enjoying themselves im- 
mensely, for in some miraculous way a roasted turkey appeared in 
their midst and a Thanksgiving Eve feast was being held. Just 
imagine those boys sitting crowded together on the floor of the box 
car eating turkey with their fingers, and calling it by name a Thanks- 
giving feast ! 

Towards dusk, however, the train stopped and they alighted to go 
the rest of the journey on foot. As Lieut. Donald Pemberton with 
his men plodded through the driving rain and deep mud, he let his 
thoughts wander back to the Thanksgiving of a year ago. During the 
ride in the box car he had been among the j oiliest, doing his bit to 



The St. Maey's Muse 11 

make others forget the situation that confronted them. He smiled 
as he contrasted his present surroundings with the banquet he had 
attended on the same evening of 1916. On that happy night the 
Junior Class of West Point had entertained the football team in an- 
ticipation of victory the next day when they were to play the ITavy, 
He could see Teddy Bowen as he toasted the Class of 1916, and drank 
to the happy future of all, little guessing the great events that were 
so soon to be a part of their lives. 

From that night his thoughts ran on to the next day — Thanksgiv- 
ing, 1916. As in a dream he saw the crowded grandstands, heard 
the cheering and applause that greeted the appearance of the Army 
team. Then came the never to be forgotten game ! Clearly he re- 
called how in the face of defeat he had made a dash through the 
center and scored a touchdown. The cheering on all sides made his 
blood tingle as the boys carried him off the field on their shoulders. 
It was then he had caught a glance of Betty Vardell standing by the 
Army colors. That was his greatest reward. 

At the dance that night, given in honor of the victorious team, he 
had given Betty a ring, a solitaire. But a few months later there was 
a misunderstanding ; she had returned the ring and broken the engage- 
ment. 

Then followed his hasty graduation from West Point and de- 
parture for France. The hours of waiting at the dock before sailing- 
were bitter and lonely to Don, for Betty was not among the crowd 
on the dock and he had not told her good-bye. 

Suddenly Lieutenant Pemberton was aroused from his dreams by 
the low distant rumbling of the guns which now became more and 
more distinct. About 9 p. m. the troops entered a deserted French 
village, where they found a company of French soldiers awaiting to 
guide them to the front. Xo light was visible anywhere, on account 
of scouting enemy air-craft, and they had to advance in total darkness. 
There had been severe firing on the front the previous day and many 
vacancies had been left in the trenches, which the American boys 
were to fill. Every precaution must be taken that the Germans might 
not learn of the reinforcements. As the "Sammies" silently passetl 



12 The St. Mary's Muse 

through the narrow communication trenches into the front line they 
were enthusiastically welcomed by the English and French soldiers 
who occupied the trenches there, not three hundred yards from the 
trenches of the Boches. 

After seeing that his men were safely established, Lieutenant 
Pemberton was ordered to report to headquarters at once. While 
waiting outside he heard some one talking very low with the General. 
The voice seemed to be arguing and pleading. At first Don could 
hear only a murmur, but the words became more and more distinct. 

"jlSTo, you need not use any arguments. I say no ! That is not the 
kind of work for you. I will find some one somewhere who will go," 
came the unmistakable voice of the General. 

"But, Uncle John, there is no one else who can be spared to go. I 
came to do my bit, and I am perfectly capable of going. I do not mind 
the danger at all. Reinforcements are needed, and I command you 
to OEDEK me to go at once !" 

"Yes, the message must be carried. You are right ; there is no one 
else who can go. Be careful ! Be careful, and come back safely. 
Your place is not here — however, go !" 

Silence fell and Don, supposing the General to be alone, walked 
into the room and came face to face with — was he blind or dreaming, 
for he could not believe his eyes ! There facing him, beside the Gen- 
eral, was Betty Vardell, dressed for her trip. Don was speechless. 

"Don!" gasped Betty. 

"Betty, what does this mean? Lieutenant Pemberton has come 
to receive orders," said Betty's uncle. 

"It means, sir, that we are old friends," stammered Don, finding 
his voice at last. 

"Oh, I see, I see!" nodded the General, wisely. 

There was no time for explanations. 

"Betty, here are the messages. Follow directions carefully. You 
need not leave here before 4 o'clock. See me just before you start." 

"And here are yours, Lieutenant Pemberton. I think you will 
understand them all right. Report to Colonel Tolar on your way 
back," he added. 



The St. Mary's Muse 13 

"That is all. I must leave you two for a while." Despite his 
heavy responsibilities he smiled at this bit of romance. 

Under the same dim moon that witnessed the distress and suffering 
"out there" Don told Betty goodbye. A complete understanding had 
been reached in the brief time they had together, and the past was 
blotted out. There was no need for words ; they each knew what was 
in the other's heart. When the time for parting drew near, with dry 
eyes and prayers in her heart Betty sent him back to the front where 
she knew only danger awaited him. 

The American papers a few days later were full of the accounts of 

the "great drive against the Germans at L , on N^ovember 28, 

1917." Lieutenant Pemberton had led his men over ISTo Man's Land 
and had taken the Germans' first trench and planted the Stars and 
Stripes on German soil. 

Unrecounted, however, was the brave act of Betty Vardell which 
had made possible the reinforcements that came to the aid of those 
in the front trenches, and pushed on the great drive. 

"Goodness ! Betty, you surely do not suppose that I am expected 
to keep track of all the lieutenants ?" said the General to the slim 
girl confronting him. "iSTow, if you might happen to ask where 
Captam Pemberton is, I would say that he was wounded and is in 
Ward 19, Station A, where I think he is in need of a nurse. So if 
you discard your present attire and don your nurse's cap you might 
be allowed to nurse him." 

Betty did not stop to answer, but started off immediately for Ward 
19, Station A. She found her newly made Captain all bandaged up, 
but smiling, as she entered his ward. 

Thus on Thanksgiving Day, while the Allies celebrated their 
victory, Betty and Don gave thanks for their safe return to each other. 



14 The St. Mary's Muse 



Mr. Stone's Mountain Trip 

W. E. Stone 

(The editor of The Muse has been kind enough to suggest that the readers 
might be interested in an account of my summer's walking trip in the North 
Carolina mountains. This is by way of apology.) 

Our starting point was ISTorth Wilkesboro ; my companion one of 
the inevitable classmates, with some of whom you are as familiar as 
I am — by hearsay — a well-known physician from Boston. On the 
railway journey and on the first day's walk, following the course of 
the Yadkin Eiver, we were struck with the destructive results of the 
floods of July a year ago ; great logs and trees washed high up and 
stranded on the banks and the rich bottomlands buried in sand where 
in former years grew rich crops of corn. Higher up the river and 
farther back from the stream we passed meadow after meadow rich 
in flourishing corn — enough, it would seem, to feed the people of the 
State and to spare. 

After a tramp of twenty-three miles we were fortunate in finding 
comfortable lodging with a farmer, Mr. Taylor, near the foot of the 
Blue Ridge, at an elevation of fifteen hundred feet, where a heavy 
blanket was a necessity. A nephew of Mr. Taylor's, we learned, is 
superintendent of the city schools of Greenville, 'N. C. At this house 
my friend had his first experience with a revolving table : the center 
of the table, raised six inches above the outer rim, holds the dishes 
and can be turned around so as to bring any dish that you wish in 
front of your plate — a wise economy of labor in war times. 

On our second day we passed over the Blue Ridge at Deep Gap, 
about twenty-five hundred feet above sea level. ITearly every house 
we passed had a springhouse near a cold clear spring, and near one 
of them we stopped for our midday meal : bacon and eggs (think of 
eggs at twenty cents a dozen ! ) and beans, cooked in our frying-pan, 
for this with tin plates and cups we carried with other necessary 
things on our backs, in what our (former) German friends call a 
rucksack, altogether a weight of about eight pounds. For dessert 
we had blackberries picked by the roadside or apples donated by some 



The St. Mary's Muse 15 

kind-hearted farmer's wife where we stopped for a drink at the spring- 
house. That night, after a walk of twenty odd miles, we found a 
quiet country hotel in Boone, said to be one of the highest towns east 
of the Rockies, at an elevation of 3,362 feet; one of the numerous 
halting places of Daniel Boone, bear hunter and explorer, and at 
present the location of the Appalachian Training School, where many 
a boy and girl from the mountains gets the first introduction into 
many of the higher things of life. 

We started off next morning early in the rain for Blowing Rock, 
along a rather wild creek bordered by a dense forest. The great logs 
and fallen trees high up on the banks were mute reminders of the 
transformation of this rather modest stream into a raging torrent by 
the rains of last summer. On this walk, as at many other places, we 
were stopped by the farmers for news of the war and for our opinion 
as to the justice of sending their boys to fight in France. Our expla- 
nations as to the needs of universal service seemed to relieve their 
minds on this point; so we had some chance to "do our bit." 

You would not wish to give me space to describe all the attractions 
of Blowing Rock ; the view down the valley of the John's River, two 
or three thousand feet below, with hoary old Grandfather bounding 
the view on one side; the quiet beauties of the String-fellow place; 
the extensive Cone estate with the lake and Flat Top and its thirty 
miles of driveway; the Raven Rocks with an entrancing view; and 
ever so many other things. You all ought to go and see them for 
yourselves. 

There are few places in the State where one doesn't meet St. Mary's 
girls or some one connected in some way with the School; so it was 
natural that at the postoffice at Blowing Rock we should run across 
Mary Clark Smith, Cotton Timberlake, and her mother and aunts, 
and several other acquaintances. 

Next day, about eleven, we started on the road to Grandfather, and 
spent the night at a farmhouse, about the last house on the road. Just 
as we got there the rain came down in sheets and the housewife said 
that "she didn't believe she could take us in ; her husband was sick," 
etc. It took as much pleading to persuade her to keep us as it does to 



16 The St. Mary's Muse 

keep a lot of St. Mary's girls from talking in class. The sick husband 
had an abscessed tooth, and here is where the doctor came in, for he 
promptly lanced the gum and relieved the pain in short order. 

The next morning was fine and the view from Grandfather (5,964 
ft.) fair, although somewhat restricted by mist and fog banks. We 
had planned to hit the trail leading down to McCrae's, but in some 
way missed it, and had to make our way down the side of the moun- 
tain, down streams and through the laurel thickets, what the natives 
call a wilderness. Hot and tired, we finally came out on the beautiful 
Yohnalossee Road, which we followed to Linville. One of the distinct 
pleasures of the high mountains is the privilege of drinking anywhere 
you please from the gushing mountain streams and feeling that the 
clear, cold water is as pure as it looks. 

At Linville Falls, our next stopping point after Linville, we found 
a comfortable boarding-house presided over by two girls who had been 
to "college" at Burnsville, and, if I am any judge, I should say they 
merited certificates in Domestic Science. The view of the falls of the 
Linville, a drop of ninety feet, seen through the deep gorge below the 
falls, formed by the wooded and rocky banks on either side, with the 
mountains in the distance, is one of the very finest views in the 
mountains. 

But I am taking too much of your space. 

The walk down the river to Linville station is grand at times and 
interesting all the way. There we took the train (the C. C. and 0.) 
to Pensacola by Altapass, wondering over the remarkable engineering 
feats by which the railroad crosses the mountains, a series of seventeen 
tunnels and a loop seven miles in circumference. 

We spent the night with Dolph Wilson, son of the famous old 
guide, Tom Wilson, who in 1857, after a search of many days by 
great numbers of people, located the body of Prof. Elisha Mitchell in 
a pool in a mountain stream, where he had been lost at night, on the 
side of the mountain that now bears his name. Eskota, two miles 
away, and the end of the railway, is a lumber camp, the headquarters 
of the three hundred employees of the lumber company which is 
denuding the lower slopes of the mountain. Higher up other com- 



The St. Mart's Muse 17 

panies are cutting the spruce and hauling it out by narrow-gauge 
railways, with spur tracks running in every direction up hill and 
down. 

Don't try to ascend Mitchell from the western side without a guide. 
The trail is obliterated and covered in many places by fallen logs, the 
work of the lumbermen. We tried it, lost the trail, spent hours break- 
ing through the laurel, saw the footprints of bears, for surely no human 
being had ever been where we went, and had to return to the camp, 
beaten, at night. Xext day, however, in spite of ominous head shak- 
ings about the coming rain, we set off at six-thirty with a competent 
guide, and after a long climb, generally along the trail, but frequently 
over fallen logs and logs charred by fire, we reached the summit, 6,711 
feet, the highest point east of the Eockies, and were rewarded by a 
very fine view. It gives one a sad impression, however, to see the 
devastating work of the lumberman's axe, and the frequent fires which 
follow, and burn out the tree seeds, so that a hundred years will not 
replace the noble spruce trees that formerly grew to the very top of 
the ridge. The descent on the eastern side is pathetic ; here the lum- 
berman has had full sway and has left the mountain scarred and 
naked, with a few gaunt skeletons standing here and there as sad 
reminders of the noble forest growth of former years. 

That day's walk brought us to Montreat, about twenty-four miles, 
and the railway station at Black Mountain, where I ran across John 
Copeland, Virginia and Rita Williams, Euth Pleasants, and others, 
and the end of our 143-mile walk. 



18 The St. Mary's Muse 



SCHOOL NEWS 



September 22: The Opening Eeception 

On the first Saturday night of the new session the reception of the 
Old Girls to the l^ew Girls was held in the parlor as usual, but we 
think that it was an unusually attractive one. 

There was great excitement over asking the ISTew Girls and in 
filling out the cards for the evening, and all the girls, both Old and 
Kew, were at the parlor door promptly at 8 o'clock. Miss Hester 
and other members of the Faculty greeted the girls at the entrance. 
On passing on into the crowd the couples stopped by the punch bowls, 
over which presided Miss Agnes Barton, Miss Margaret Bottum, and 
Agnes Pratt. As the bell was tapped partners were exchanged as 
designated on the cards, thus giving chances for introductions all 
around and individual welcomes to the ]^ew Girls. 

It is after this Opening Reception that the 'New Girls feel at home 
and friends with everybody, which is the aim of this delightful event 
held every session. 

September 27: The First Student Meeting 

On Thursday evening, September 27th, that important first Stu- 
dent Meeting of the year was held in the Schoolroom at the time 
usually given to the "Thursday Talk." Katharine Drane, the presi- 
dent of the new Senior Class, presided, as has been customary, and 
gave full indication of proving a popular and successful presiding 
officer over the student affairs of the year. 

The purpose of this first meeting was to bring all the girls closer 
together, and to impress on them what St. Mary's with its noble tra- 
ditions and principles stands for. Several of the girls made short 
talks on such subjects as the honor and politeness of a St. Mary's 
girl, and on her position in connection with the War. These talks 
were enthusiastically received and proved of much benefit to all. 

E. McM. r. 
October 2: The Societies and The Muse 

"The Muse Club wishes to offer to the Literary Societies the charge 

of the strictly literary part of the monthly Muse. There are eight 



The St. Mary's Muse 19 

Muses published during the school year. Our first Muse this year 
will be merely an opening number ; the last one will be the Commence- 
ment Muse. This, then, leaves six numbers of the Muse in which 
the Muse Club suggests that the two literary societies alternately fur- 
nish and gather together stories, poems, sketches, etc., sufficient to fill 
the eight pages immediately following the first page. 

"If this suggestion be adopted by the societies, of course each 
society must elect associate editors, who will be members of the Muse 
Board. It might be possible for the societies to arrange some form 
of contest in relation to these six Muses^ and it is suggested by the 
Muse Club that each society elect a committee of three to meet with a 
committee of three from the Muse Club, to discuss the different aspects 
and phases of this suggestion. By the adoption of this suggestion the 
Muse Club hopes that more people will become vitally interested in 
the Muse; also, that a stronger and better spirit of interest and rivalry 
will grow up within the literary societies themselves." 

This document was read in each of the two literary societies on 
Tuesday night, October 2d. The offer was immediately adopted by 
both societies and will go into effect with the October number of the 
MusE^ in which the Sigma Lambda Literary Society will furnish the 
literary portion. 

October 3: Facnlty Eeception 

On Wednesday afternoon, October 3d, a delightful reception was 
given by the Faculty to the town friends of the School in honor of Miss 
Hester, our new Lady Principal. The parlor was decorated for the 
occasion with autumn leaves and flowers. ''Miss Katie" graciously 
presided at the tea table, and sandwiches and stuffed dates were served 
by some of the girls. During the course of the afternoon about a 
hundred guests called. 

October 4 and October 6: 3Irs. Tauglian's Talks 

As the "Thursday Talk" on October 4th and again on Saturday 
afternoon, October 6th, we had the pleasure of hearing Mrs, Kate 
Brew Vaughan, who was spending the week in Raleigh demonstrating 
and lecturing at the City Auditorium along the lines of Food Con- 



20 The St. Mary's Muse 

servation and proper Household Economy, especially as modified by 
the war conditions. 

On Thursday Mrs. Vaughan spoke of the need of Food Conserva- 
tion in supplying the war needs of our people and of our allies, and 
of the need of each individual doing her share in furthering the com- 
mon good. She made the appeal specific by suggesting that the girls 
consider how they could help in the matter both by suggesting to the 
School authorities the student approval of meatless and of wheat] ess 
days and by the voluntarj'^ limitation by the girls of their personal 
expenditures for candies, fountain drinks, and such like non-necessi- 
ties. At a student meeting the students enthusiastically endorsed 
Mrs. Vaughan's suggestions by approving one meatless and one wheat- 
less day each week, the authorities concurring, and by resolving to 
limit their candy to a pound a month, as advised. While no action 
with regard to a definite limitation in other purchases was taken by 
the meeting, large groups of girls are limiting their Monday fountain- 
visits to two a month or less and are cooperating in the food conserva- 
tion movement in other ways. 

On Saturday Mrs. Vaughan based her talk on Ruskin's definition 
of the perfect lady, who should know how to do three things. First, 
she should be able to dance, but Mrs. Vaughan explained very beauti- 
fully that he meant by this not the dancing of today, but the quaint 
old-fashioned dances of our grandmothers and the folk dances, which 
gave the carriage and poise that the lady should have. Then, second, 
Ruskin's perfect lady would know how to dress, not wear the most 
expensive and handsome clothes, but know how to dress appropriately. 
And, third, Ruskin's lady would know how to cook. Mrs. Vaughan 
only touched on this point, as she said this last was what she did, and 
she didn't feel like praising it, but in her work and life we feel that 
we had this point exemplified. 

It was a great pleasure to have Mrs. Vaughan here. 

October 13: The "Gym" Party 

Both Sigmas and Mus, old and new, will long remember the "Gym" 
party of 1917. The Grymnasium was thronged with girls in "G}Tn" 



The St. Mary's Muse 21 

suits, ready for the fun, blue and red intermingling ready to start. 
The evening was opened with yells and songs by the opposing associa- 
tions which continued during the evening at the conclusion of the 
various events that made the program for the party. Excitement 
reached its highest pitch during the dodge ball games and relay races. 
Both these events were won by the Sigmas, giving them the honors of 
the evening. 

At the conclusion of the athletic events a half-hour of dancing was 
enjoyed, and the girls dispersed with reluctance after their good time 
in the Gym. 

October 16: Patriotic Eally 

Tuesday evening, October 16th, the entire School attended a Patri- 
otic Rally on the eve of the issue of the Second Liberty Loan Bonds. 
Capt. J. Stewart Allen, a Canadian late of the Princess Pat Regiment, 
no longer able to serve and now in charge of the military training at 
the University of ISTorth Carolina, spoke most interestingly of his 
experiences at the front, giving a clear and enlightening account of the 
methods of trench warfare. He was followed by Mr. Freeman, editor 
of a Richmond paper and author of "The First Year of the War," 
who spoke forcibly on the issues before the people, urging the hearty 
support of the Liberty Loans by every citizen of the United States, 
stating clearly and concisely the significance of these loans and the 
duty of the United States citizens in supporting them. 

The entire program was intensely interesting and inspiring to those 
present, and all entered thoroughly into the spirit of the evening. 

October 17: Tlie State Fair 

Fair Week fell this year October 15th to 20th, and Wednesday and 
Thursday were observed, as usual, by the School as holidays. 

On Wednesday, just after lunch, excited chattering groups began 
to gather in front of Main Building, all prepared to have the very best 
time possible. Safely on the cars, the fun began, for in a few minutes 
every one was passing through the Fair Ground gates into the Midway, 
where, besides the ever enjoyable Whip, Merry-go-Round, and Ferris 



22 The St. Mary's Muse 

Wheel, there were lined up all the varied and wondrous sideshows, 
while the fortune-tellers told just as mysterious tales as before. All 
the same places, familiar to the Old Girls from experience, and to the 
New Girls from hearsay, had to be visited. It was found that the 
"cotton candy" vanished as fascinatingly as ever, and that hot dogs 
and sandwiches were just as good as memory had pictured them. 
How the hours did fly ! It really did seem almost no time before the 
last souvenir had been bought, the last ride taken, and St. Mary's 
girls were streaming into the grove happy and tired. Some piled off 
overloaded street cars, others strolled up the west walk, and a few 
favored ones drove up in machines. However they arrived, the girls 
were loaded with balloons, balls, "squeedunks," the popular swagger 
sticks, and so forth, and every one was full of jokes on the other girls, 
and tales of the "perfectly wonderful time" that can never be for- 
gotten. 

October 19: M. Stephane Lausanne Addresses the School 

We had the unusual pleasure of having with us for lunch on Friday, 
October 19th, M. Stephane Lausanne, editor of the Paris Matin, who 
is lecturing in the United States on the war in Europe. After lunch 
he spoke briefly but effectively to those present in the dining-room, 
telling of the French situation, of the brave little country in the great 
struggle, and of the Hun and their dealings with the Allies, of their 
destruction and barbarity, and methods of warfare. 

His manner was charming and pleasing, at the same time being 
forceful and straight to the point. We have had no greater honor 
this year than that of having him address the School, and certainly 
no more interesting or inspiring occasion. 

October 22: The Fall Athletic Meet 

The first event of the athletic year was the outdoor meet held Mon- 
day afternoon, October 22d. Throughout the afternoon there was 
much admirable work on each side, giving promise of an especially 
good year in the athletic line. 



The St. Mary's Muse 23 

The result of the meet was a victory for the Mus, the score being 

260 points to 2381/0, as follows: 

Sigma Mu 

I. Three-Legged Race 6 3 

Sigma, 1st and 3d; Mu, 2d. 

II. Running Broad Jump 39y2 33 

Every 6 inches over 10 ft. scored 1 point. 

III. Dodge Ball 22 36 

Each girl not hit out scored 2 points. 

IV. Running High Jump 138 176 

Every inch over 3 ft. scored 1 point. 

V. Arch Goal Ball 23 12 

2 points for each goal; 5 points for 1st place. 
VI. Relay Race 10 

2381/2 260 

E. Waddell and H. Battle, Sigma, won the Three-Legged Race, 
with K. Batts and R. Howie, Mu, second, and H. Barber and R. Hill, 
Sigma, third. In the Broad Jump, Mary Hoke led with a jump of 
13 ft. 10 in., followed by Elspeth Askew, 12 ft. 9 in., and Nina 
Cooper, 12 ft. 8 in. The St. Mary's record, made by Helen Battle in 
1916, is 15 ft. 6 in., while the American Woman's Record is 16 ft. 
9y2 in. In the Running High Jump, Helen Battle and Nina Cooper 
tied at 1 ft. 1 in., while E. Askew, Harriet Barber, Mary Dall, Mary 
Hoke, and Millicent Barwis each jumped 4 ft. The previous record, 
4 ft. 1 in., was made by Helen Battle in 1916, while the Women's 
Record is 4 ft. 9 inches. 

October 25: The Liberty Bonds 

On Thursday, October 25th, Dr. Lay talked on the Liberty Bonds 
and our part in the War. Following the talk, in order to give effect 
to his suggestions, a Student Meeting was held with Katharine Drane 
presiding, and it was resolved to subscribe to $250 of the Liberty 
Bonds for the student-body and to raise this amount for this purpose 
among the girls. The bonds when fully paid for are to be contributed 
as the gift of the girls to the Endowment Fund of St. Mary's, thus 



24 The St. Mary's Muse 

aiding two good causes at the same time. Over $200 has thus far 
been promised to be paid in by the Christmas Vacation. 

October 27: Literary Society Reception 

The old members of the Sigma Lambda and Epsilon Alpha Pi 
Literary Societies gave a delightful reception in the parlor on Satur- 
day evening, October 27th. The parlor was beautifully decorated in 
autumn leaves. Miss Hester, Estelle Ravenel, and Helen Laughing- 
house and the other officers of the societies were in the receiving line 
to welcome the guests. 

The program for the evening began with a delightful talk by Dr. 
Lay on "Patriotism." This was followed by a patriotic recitation by 
Aline Hughes. Then Anita Smith gave a delightful solo, "Chrysan- 
themums." This was followed by a reading, "Mr. Hoover Will Get 
You If You Don't Look Out," by Agnes Pratt. The program was 
concluded with the singing of "The Star-Spangled Banner" by Hilah 
Tarwater. 

Delicious refreshments were served by some of the Old Girls, the 
idea of the patriotic entertainment being carried out in the favors of 
little flags, and tiny red, white and blue whistles in the form of steam- 
boats. Every one went away blowing whistles, waving flags, and each 
Kew Girl feeling fully repaid for having passed on all studies, and 
so becoming a member of one of the societies. 

October 29: Faculty Recital 

The First Faculty Eecital of the season was given in the Audi- 
torium on the evening of Monday, October 29th, and was an Ensemble 
Recital by Miss Louise Seymour and Miss Rebecca Hill Shields. 

The best example of the perfect time and technique was probably 
the Danse Macabre by Saint-Saens, which was most thoroughly appre- 
ciated. Miss Seymour and Miss Shields were assisted by a string 
quartet composed of Mr. Gustav Hagedorn, flrst violin, Miss Ida Mae 
Lyons, second violin, Mr. Robert Jordan, viola, Mr. Wilbur Royster, 
violoncello. 



The St. Mary's Muse 25 



The program was as follows : 



Saint-Saens Variations on a Beethoven theme 

(1835- ) 

Schubert Quartet in E flat, op. 125 

(1797-1828) 

Allegro Moderate 
Scherzo 
Adagio 
Allegro 

Chaminade Le Soir 

(1861- ) Le Matin 

Arensky Valse 

(1862-1906) Romance 

Saint-Saens Danse Macabre 



October 31: Hallowe'en Party 

An air of mystery prevailed everywhere. Every one seemed busy 
with scissors, pins, and all kinds of materials. Every one was asking, 
"What are you going to represent ?" and getting the same answer : 
''Wait and see !" Hallowe'en night, as Miss Sutton struck the first 
chords of the grand march, such a happy procession as came marching 
in — fairies, Japanese, Chinese, witches, Indians and everything im- 
aginable. After one or two short dances a hush of expectancy passed 
through the crowd and "The Seniors are coming" was passed from 
one to another. There had been various surmises as to what they 
would represent, but who would ever have imagined the dignified 
Seniors as the "Funny Paper" ? The Newly-Weds, Hooligan and 
Susanne, Alphonso and Gaston, and the Katzen jammer family were all 
there, and they each gave us a little characteristic scene. After this 
every one scattered, some to the fortune-booths to "ring" a fortune, 
others to the different little tents to have their fortunes really told, 
while the bravest ventured to go through the witches' cave, about 
which all kinds of awful experiences are related, such as shaking- 
hands with a ghost, hearing his bones rattle, and even having his 
blood dropped on you. Every one had such a good time that we were 
all sorry that the 31st of October only comes once a year. 



26 The St. Maky's Muse 

November 1: Founders' Day 

November 1st is always celebrated at St. Mary's as Founders' Day 
and is the one day set apart during tlie year for commemorating tbe 
lives of those who have made St. Mary's what it is. An inter-society 
meeting was held in the parlor for this purpose. The program con- 
sisted of Alma Mater by the School, a reading on "Founders' Day 
and Its Meaning," by Dorothy Kirtland; a reading on the "Life of 
Dr. Aldert Smedes," by Rebecca Baxter; a talk on the "History of 
the Chapel," by Miss Katie ; and the meeting came to a close with the 
singing of "In a Grove of Stately Oak Trees." 

November 3: The Inter-Class Parties 

The fall Class Parties were held this year on the evening of Satur- 
day, I^ovember 3d, the Seniors entertaining the Sophomores in the 
Muse Room, the Juniors entertaining the Freshmen in the parlor, and 
the "Preps" having a great time in honor of themselves in the "old 
dining-room." 

The Seniors had decorated the Muse Room very prettily in green 
and white, the colors of 1920, and offered for the entertainment of 
their guests an amusing guessing contest based on popular musical 
airs, Elspeth Askew proving the successful one in her answers. A 
salad course was served, in the same color scheme, after which "Miss 
Katie" toasted the Sophomores and Miss Hester the Seniors. The 
Rector's toast, also, was graceful and much appreciated. 

In the parlor the Juniors gave a "little girl and boy party," and 
the "children" were very attractive and decidedly amusing. The 
Juniors as capped and aproned maids received their young proteges 
and entertained them with such grown-up games as "blind man's buif" 
and "marching to Jerusalem." The stick candy and lemonade was 
very refreshing. Guests and hostesses united in the enjoyment of an 
evening of simplicity and fun. 

The "Preps" rejoiced in a "tacky party," and it was a "rich and 
rare" occasion. Some of the teachers appearing in costume gave added 
enjojTuent and added to the spirit of the occasion. The feature of the 
program was the music of the "Chinese Marine Band" on the combs, 



The St. Mary's Muse 



with Mary J^eal leading, a treat so thrilling that it almost broke up 
the dancing. Margaret Yorke's "solo dance" also won much favor. 
The refreshments "strung out" through the evening, from "all-day- 
suckers" to peanuts, were heartily consumed, and every one had a 
good time. Sara Lesley had the honor of being voted the "tackiest" 
present, but there were several near rivals. 

The members of the Faculty were invited to all three of the parties, 
and seemed to enjoy the glimpses they took at each of them. 

Norember 8: Mr. Stone Entertains the Seniors 

On Thursday afternoon, ]^ovember 8th, the Seniors were delight- 
fully entertained by Mr. and Mrs. Stone, at their home on Boylan 
Avenue. Soon after arriving the guests were put to work with a very 
interesting gaiessing contest in which Katharine Drane won the honors. 
a gift of some beautiful yellow chrysanthemums. When the guests 
entered the dining-room they found still another guessing contest, for 
each person had to find her place by guessing the riddle on her place 
card which would make her name. After these had been puzzled out, 
with a good deal of help from Mr. Stone, very delicious refreshments 
were served. Soon after this it was discovered that it was almost six 
o'clock, and the party broke up regretfully. Mr. and Mrs. Stone 
always entertain most delightfully, and the Seniors spent a most 
enjoyable afternoon with them. 

Noremher 10: The Circns 

Every year the "Circus" forms one of the most exciting and amus- 
ing events of the fall term. It is one of the best entertainments gotten 
up under the auspices of the Muse Club, showing much ingenuity and 
well used originality. Every one joins in the spirit of a real "circus" ; 
and it is indeed a circus ! The whole School certainly owes the Muse 
Club and their circus coterie a vote of thanks for one of the most 
delightful and amusing evenings ever spent at St. Mary's. 

As the eager, expectant crowd poured past the ticket stand just 
inside the Gym, and quite as well placed and as effective as Barnum 



28 The St. Mary's Mtjse 

& Bailey's own, they entered the circus world of wonders. To the 
left were the great sideshows, "The Fat Lady with the Little Feet," 
"The Tall Lady and The Fat Lady," "The Great Bed Sea," "World's 
Famous Fortune-Tellers," etc., along with peanut and popcorn stands. 
To the right was the animal tent, and surely the real dumb creatures 
would have been jealous of their human counterparts ! There was a 
huge cat, a big green frog, two most lovable monkeys, a great Belgian 
hare, and rarest of all, an elephant, the likes of which has never been 
seen before. They were most attractively arranged in stalls with hay 
in plenty and keepers to avoid any accidents or harm to the circus- 
goers. Then there was the ice-cream stand, most attractive in the 
patriotic decorations, which proved most popular. And the "hot-dog" 
stand still further on needs no description or testimonial of its attrac- 
tiveness and popularity ; the clowns who served had the rush of their 
lives. 

Time had hardly been given for full enjoyment of the side attrac- 
tions before the ringmaster, followed by the animals, entered the ring 
in the center of the floor. Ellen Lay made a most original and anms- 
ing ringmaster, and the monkeys kept things lively whenever there 
was danger of a lull in the ring. There followed wonderf vil acrobatic 
stunts by a group of artistically dressed acrobats, ingenious clown 
stunts by several delightful clowns, music by a Scotch kilty band which 
deserves wide fame for their good music, and there were solo dances 
beautifully rendered by Sara Denson and Louise Bacon in Hawaiian 
costume. 

It is impossible to give in detail all the delights of that circus, but it 
will long be remembered with keen enjoyment by the spectators. 

NoTember 12: First Team Basket-Bali Game 

The first game of basket-ball by the first teams of the Sigma and 
Mu Athletic Associations was held Monday, JSTovember 12th. Through- 
out the game there was unusually quick playing on the part of all, 
and some unusually good passing. If the first game is considered an 
indication, the basket-ball of this year will be of unusual interest. 
The result was a victory for the Sigmas with a score of 10-3. 



The St. Mary's Muse 29 

The line-up was as follows : 

Sigma Mu 

Waddell (Capt.) Forward McMullan 

N. Cooper Forward Cabell 

Ravenel Center E. B. Lay 

Mullins Side Center Barber 

Battle Guard Burke ( Capt. ) 

Scott Guard Glass 

Noyember 15: Rev. Dr. Elmore, Y. M. C. A. Speaker During Campaign Week 

On Thursday morning, N^oveniber 15th, we had the very great 
pleasure of having Rev. Dr. W. T. Elmore address the student-body 
and the Faculty in the Schoolroom. 

Dr. Elmore is the pastor of the Baptist Church at Hamilton, X. Y., 
was formerly for many years a missionary in India, and is now doing 
Y. M. C. A. work in the Army, being at present stationed at Camp 
Greene, IT. C. 

His address to the School will long be remembered by those who 
heard him, and the broad and deep impressions of the work of 
the Y. M. C. A. among our soldiers here, and among the fighting 
forces abroad, will be lasting. He spoke of many things, the keynote 
of all being Service, from the work of the Y. M. C. A. to the vital 
service of those who are devoting their lives to giving much-needed 
aid to the poor of India. In connection with the Y. M. C. A. work 
he read two poems written by "Rookies," witty but full of pictures 
of the splendid Y. M. C. A. service in the camps and in the trenches. 
"The Y. M. C. A. Sec." was most delightful. Who can forget the 
figure of the Y. M. C. A. man with his ever-ready cup of steaming 
coffee, in the camp, in the trench, and in ]^o Man's Land, for the 
wounded there, as pictured in the second poem ? Poems such as these 
drive home to us the spirit of the service of the Y. M. C. A. by the 
lasting place it has gained in the hearts of the men at the front and 
in camp, as portrayed by the verses of the "Rookies" themselves. 

Dr. Elmore gave many personal sketches of the life at the camps' 
Y. M. C. A. headquarters. Especially impressive was that of the 
Montana "mule skinners." 



30 The St. Maey's Muse 

Dr. Elmore's manner was most charming, evidenced strongly by 
the complete captivation of his audience. How fortunate the work 
of the Y. M. C. A. is to have a man so understanding in his sympa- 
thies, so personally attractive, and so intensely alive to the mission 
of the Y. M. C. A,, and with so broad a view and experience in the 
field of service ! 

I^^or can we fail to realize more fully the splendid work of the 
Y. M. C. A. and the importance of our individual support to this far- 
reaching service for "Our Boys," both here and abroad. 

M. H. B. 
Noyember 15: First Expression Recital 

On Thursday afternoon, ^November 15th, a most enjoyable recital 
was given by members of Miss Davis's Expression Class. The pro- 
gram took the form of several readings, followed by a one-act play. 
The recitations were all well rendered, one of the most delightful 
being a realistic selection given by Dorothy Kirtland. The one-act 
play was hardly to be improved upon ; the parts were well taken, and 
the whole evening was thoroughly delightful to all present. 

The program was as follows : 

"The First Call on the Butcher" (Monologue) Virginia Wiuliams 

"Locherbie Street" ^ 

"A Song" s. (Selections -from Riley) Ruth Russell 

"A Boy's Mother" j 

"Unexpected Guests" (Monologue) ; Annie Higgs 

"Who's Afraid?" Dorothy Kirtland 

ONE-ACT PLAY 

"FIRST AID TO THE WOUNDED" 

By Harold Montague 

characters 

Sybil Rawson, Dr. Rawson's daughter Alice Seed 

Lieutenant Martin, a patient Katheeine White 

Scene — Sitting-room at Dr. Rawson's home 

Noyember 18: A Visit From Dean Myers 

Rev. George B. Myers, Dean of the Cathedral in Havana^ Cuba, 
who is now traveling in the southern dioceses in the interest of his 



The St. Maey's Muse 



missionary work among the Cubans in and out of Havana, spent 
Sunday, !N'ovember 18tli, in Raleigh, and, in addition to speaking at 
the city churches, made the address at our five o'clock service in the 
Chapel and spoke to the members of the Junior Auxiliary in the 
parlor after supper. 

Dean Myers' addresses were very much appreciated and he aroused 
much interest among the girls in his work. 

At the afternoon service he spoke on the new civilization which 
will be built up after the war, and said that it must be a Christian 
civilization if it is to last, and that this Christian civilization can 
only be secured by giving a Christian education to the coming gener- 
ation, be they white, black, yellow, or brown. 

To the Auxiliary Dean Myers told briefly how the Church work 
in Cuba embraced three sides — the ministration to the Americans 
and other white Church people, which is self-supporting; the minis- 
tration to the West Indian black people, members of the Church of 
England, who form an important part of the floating population of 
Havana and other parts of Cuba ; and the work among the native 
Cubans, of a distinctly missionary character, the special work for 
which he is appealing. He showed some very pretty and interesting 
pictures of the Cathedral and of characteristic Cuban scenes, and 
told many interesting things about his rapidly growing work. And 
he again emphasized the need of training up the young people of 
today with the best Christian ideals in order to ensure a fine, strong, 
true civilization after the war is over. 

It was interesting to St. Mary's girls to know that Dean ]\Iyers was 
at one time closely associated with Bishop Bratton, and that the head 
of one of the Cathedral schools under his charge was for many years 
Miss Elleneen E. Checkley, now of Canada, but for a number of 
years, while teacher of History, a prominent member of the St. Mary's 
Faculty. 



32 The St. Mary's Muse 



SCHOOL NOTES 



At the beginning of school all the old St. Mary's girls were ex- 
tremely glad to see J^ancy Woolford and Katherine Darden, even 
though their visit was such a short one. IS^ancy stopped with us for 
a few days before taking up her training at St. Lul<;e's Hospital, IN^ew 
York. We, one and all, wish her the best of success in her work. 

Later in the year, for the Fair and short visits to friends in School, 
we were delighted to have with us a number of old St. Mary's girls, 
among whom were : Anne Wilson, I^ellie Rose, "Doodley" Cheatham, 
Helen Brigham, Carol Collier, Julia and Virginia P. Allen, Martha 
and Helen Wright (now Mrs. Munt), and Evelyn Moss. We were 
also glad to have a glimpse of Catherine Gilmer, Placid Clark, Hattie 
Copeland, Martha Hood, Rosa Lee Willingham, Sallie Hyman, and 
Mary Lamb (Mrs. Bunn), Alice ISToble, Sara Borden, Lucile Ander- 
son, and Minerva Stockton. 

Visits from all old St. Mary's girls are welcomed with great pleas- 
ure by both the Faculty and old students. We are always glad to have 
them with us again, and hope that they will come to St. Mary's as 
often as they are in Raleigh, and look upon it as a place where they 
can always find a warm welcome from dear old friends. 



With the Rector 

On October 15th Dr. Lay left Raleigh for a very interesting trip 
ITorth. He first attended the ^National Convention of the Brother- 
hood of St. Andrew, in Philadelphia, which was especially interesting 
with regard to war work in cantonments. There were some splendid 
addresses by men of national importance, and perhaps the address 
of Mr. S. S. ISTash, brother-in-law of Bishop Cheshire, about the work 
in Tarboro and neighborhood, aroused as much interest as any. Two 
of the principal addresses were by Mr. George Wliarton Pepper of 
Philadelphia, and Governor Manning of South Carolina. While at- 



The St. Maky's Muse 33 

tending this convention Dr. Lay met a number of classmates and old 
friends, the Eector of St. Clements and Rev. Llewell}Ti X. Caley being 
among the latter. 

The Hector then went on to Xew York City mainly for the purpose 
of attending the meetings of the Southern Commercial Congress. 
It had been eighty years since a Southern Commercial organization 
of this kind had met in jSTew York. Governor Manning again took a 
prominent part, and evoked much enthusiasm when he said he had 
five sons, all of whom had enlisted in the United States service. Be- 
sides a large number of men from IsTorth Carolina and South Carolina, 
and other parts of the South, the governors of several States, and 
large delegations from the diplomatic corps were present. 

"WTiile in ISTew York the Rector saw Mrs. Stocking (Miss Luney) 
and Miss Thomas. He also saw several of the recent Alumnse, among 
whom were Elizabeth Carrison (S. M. S., '15) and jSTancy Woolford 
(S. M. S., 1915-17), and called on several others who, unfortunately 
for him, were out. The Rector had the great pleasure of dining with 
Rev. St. Clair Hester and family. 

On his return Dr. Lay spent a day again in Philadelphia, staying 
with a former St. Paul's School master, and while there met a number 
of St., Paul's School alumni. He attended all day a series of meetings 
at the Drexel Institute in connection with its Twenty-fifth Anni- 
versary. The Institute entertained the members of this Conference 
most delightfully at lunch, afternoon tea, and a smoker. The meet- 
ings were a fitting climax to the various interests treated with in the 
other meetings above mentioned, the object being to show what the 
universities and colleges were doing and could do in view of the war 
and the conditions following the war. The two main points that 
seemed to stand out most prominently were, that the war is being run 
by college-bred men, and that to the educational institutions of this 
country and Japan the world must look to prepare men and women 
to help in its rebuilding when the war is over. Especial appeal was 
made that the higher institutions for women in this country should 
offer free opportunity for education to fit the women to take the places 
of the more than 1,300,000 men who have already been killed. The 



34 



The St. Mart's Muse 



most interesting thing about the Drexel Institute, in the Rector's 
mind, was that the men students are in the minority and, therefore, 
are the co-eds ! 

The Rector's first sermon, on his return, was largely a recounting 
of the inspirations of the meetings, and suggestions as to our line of 
duty here. 



The Y. M. C. A. "Sec." 

[These verses illustrating the close relation in the everyday life of the men 
in camp to the Y. M. C. A. secretaries were used by Dr. Elmore in his address, 
and he kindly furnished a copy of the clipping for reproduction here.] 



If a rookie wants a pen, 

See the Sec. 
If the checkerboard needs men, 

See the Sec. 
That's him standing over there 
With that "morning after" air, 
Helping fix that busted chair, 

That's the Sec. 

"Say, have you folks got some string 

Mister Sec?" 
"Mister, can you help us sing?" 

That same Sec. 
"Pa's address is put on wrong." 
"Say, how far to old Hong Kong?" 
He hears this stuff right along, 

Don't you, Sec? 

If a blotter will not blot, 

See the Sec. 
If your table mess is rot, 

Tell the Sec. 
If your wife is out of lard. 
If you've got ten hours on guard, 
If the "M. P.'s" got your pard, 

See the Sec. 



' 'Trola needles are all out, 

Mister Sec." 
'Water sprinkler needs a spout, 

Mister Sec." 
''What is good for frost-bit nose?" 
'D'you know when the mess-call blows?'' 
That's the way it always goes, 

Don't it. Sec? 

If a rookie cannot write. 

Get the Sec. 
If your tent-mate snores at night, 

Tell the Sec. 
If it's anything at all, 
Fountain pen or basket-ball, 
He will be there when you call. 

Good old Sec. 

At ten p. m. he hits the hay — 

Good-night, Sec. 
But when morning bugles play, 

Get up. Sec. 
'Say, have you all got a hoe?" 
'Where does the Seaboard Air Line go?'' 
'Gimme a pencil, right quick, do!" 

Oh, you, Sec. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Subscription Price - '- One Dollar 

Single Copies -- Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's 
School, Raleigh, N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumna, under the 
editorial management of the Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF, 1917-1918 

Aline E. Hughes, '18, Editor-in-Chief 

senior reporters 
Kathaeine p. Drane, '18 Elizabeth McM. Folk, '18 

junior reporters 
Helen Van W. Battle, '20 Ellen Lay, '19 

Mildred Kirtland, '20 Alice Seed, '20 

Agnes T. Pratt, '18, Business Manager 

Mary C. Wilson, '20, Assistant Business Manager 



EDITORIAL 



With this uumber we are beginning the twenty-second volume of 
the Muse, and though the Muse is so old as twenty-one years, we wish 
to remind our readers that the present Board of Editors is only just 
beginning its existence. Realizing our own youth and the age of the 
Muse, we are therefore asking the help and cooperation of those who 
have gone before us, as well as of the girls who are at St. Mary's this 
year. We know what great interest the Alumnse feel in the Muse, 
as well as in their Alma Mater itself, so we are asking them to help 
us, with their interest, subscriptions, and news. From the girls of 
'17-18 we need and expect a great many things: sketches, stories, 
poems, news. We want them to realize, too, that this is their Muse — 
not just the Muse Club's, or the Alumnae's — and that only with the 
help of every girl in the School can we make this Muse just as inter- 



36 The St. Mary's Muse 

esting as we all wish it to be. If you girls have ever read any Muses 
of the past you will realize what high standards we have to live up 
to ; so we all will have to get to work — good hard work together — 
to uphold these standards as well as it is in us to do. 



The Seventy-Sixth Session 

The new session always causes a variety of feelings : We are glad 
to welcome new friends, and yet we can but miss those friends who 
are away. We have many new friends this year, beginning with Miss 
Hester, Mrs. Marriott, and Miss Agnes Barton in the Faculty, and 
including all of the new girls. We wish to welcome them all, and to 
assure Miss Hester that we are anxious to help her and cooperate 
with her and Dr. Lay in every way possible. Then, too, we wish Miss 
Thomas, and the others who have left us, to know that we miss them 
and think of them often. 

The Senior Class regrets the absence of two of its members, Ruth 
Gebert and Marion Edwards. Ruth Gebert is attending college in 
her home State, Louisiana, and we feel that Marion Edwards is one 
of the St. Mary's contributions to the war, because she leaves school 
to take up training as a nurse in the Children's Hospital at Wash- 
ington, from which hospital Grace Crews, another St. Mary's girl, 
graduated last Spring. 

To the New Girls 

Of course, you all have studied the catalogue till you almost know 
it by heart ; but there are a few other words we would like to add, on 
the subject of Student Organizations. Every one belongs to a branch 
of the Junior Auxiliary, and also to one of the two athletic associa- 
tions. Although the Mus have held the championship in athletics 
for some time, the Sigmas have given them a stiff fight, and we are 
hoping for some good games this year ; and also hoping that the new 
girls will have lots of "Pep" and interest, as well as skill in playing 
basket-ball, volley ball, etc. 



The St. Maey's Muse 37 

The organizations with voluntary membership, the Sketch Club, 
the Music organizations, the Dramatic Club, of course have certain 
qualifications for membership. We are hoping, though, that there 
will be numbers of new girls with musical and artistic talent, and 
that many of them will "try out" for the Dramatic Club. You new 
girls, talk to the old girls and find out about how much fun "dra- 
matics" are ; and do not let these old girls frighten you with tales of 
"trying out." We need some "stars," and none of you "know what you 
can do 'til you try." 

The Altar Guild, which really does mean so much at St. Mary's, 
is in "Miss Katie's" charge, as is the Auxiliary, and those girls who 
are invited to join should feel the honor, as well as responsibility, 
accompanying membership. 

The question of limited membership in the literary societies is yet 
to be worked up, but we do want some good work and enthusiasm for 
debates, or whatever else comes in the literary program of the year. 
There are so many interesting modern questions these days that we 
should be able to make that program interesting enough for every- 
body. The records of the two societies are just about equal, so it is 
"up to" every individual girl to help her society in this year's race for 
the championship. Of course, we all are going to do our very best. 

All you new girls, we are looking to you for new ideas and help on 
all these lines ; so please don't fail us. We have great faith in you. 
And, finally, remember that no organization watches the development 
and work of the new girls with more interest than the Muse Club, 
which officially edits the Monthly and Annual Muse. The Muse Club 
formally elects its new members semiannually, and is always looking 
for interested, efficient new members, with the true St. Mary's spirit, 
to take the place of those members who. necessarily leave at each 
Commencement. 

The Athletic Associations 

The athletic activities have started off with their usual vigor, and 
the athletic program has been carried out these first months even a 
little better than heretofore. The Sigmas have had the best of the 



38 The St. Mary's Muse 

early contests, but the Mus are far from hopeless of evening things 
up later on in the year. 

The new members were "selected" as heretofore, and the season 
opened with the Gym. Party for all in honor of the new members, 
which was given on September 29th. 

On Monday, October 22, the Fall Meet proved interesting to an 
enthusiastic audience, and proved a divided victory, as the Mus won 
on points despite the fact that the Sigmas were victorious in four of 
the five events. 

On the following Monday the first basket-ball game resulted in a 
victory for the Sigmas, 10 to 3 ; and on Monday, ISTovember 12, the 
Sigmas were victors in the first Junior basket-ball game. 

The Tennis Tournament, begun early in October, has been carried 
through promptly. 

The ofiicers of the associations for 1917-18 are: 

Sigma Mu 

EsTELLE Ravenel President Katharine Drane 

Marian Drane Secretary-Treasurer Nina Burke 

Elizabeth Waddell Basket-hall Captain Nina Burke 



The Junior Auxiliary 

In the desire to make the work of the Junior Auxiliary more ef- 
fective, a somewhat different organization has been arranged for the 
year, and has made a good start toward a season of accomplishment. 

Miss "Katie" McKimmon continues to be the active head of the 
Auxiliary, with a supervising oversight over all the chapters, but the 
girls have assumed more direct responsibility than heretofore and 
under the leadership of Susan Smith and a council of representatives 
from each of the chapters are working out the plans for the year. 

Instead of having the chapters divided according to residence in 
the dormitories, the choice of members was this year selective, a com- 
mittee of three for each chapter being commissioned by the Rector to 
choose the other members of the chapter. An eighth chapter has been 
named in honor of Miss Kate McKimmon, and each of the eight 
chapters has approximately twenty members. 



The St. Mary's Muse 39 

Junior Auxiliary Organization, 1917-18 

General Directress, Miss McKimmon 
Chairman of the Council, Susan Smith 
St. Anne's Chapter St. Agnes' Chapter 

Estelle Ravenel President Susan Smith 

Mary C. Wilson Vice-President Bessie Folk 

Janet White Secretary Mary Ruth Divine 

Mildred Jones Treasurer Catherine Lefferts 

Members of the Council 
M. Jones, M. C. Wilson, M. Lesley S. Smith, M. R. Divine, C. Lefferts 
Miss Roberts Directress Miss Robins 

St. Monica's Chapter St. Margaret's Chapter 

Carrie McI. Wilkes President Mildred Kirtland 

Mary Mullins Vice-President Helen Battle 

Louise Pearsall Secretary-Treasurer Katharine Drane 

Members of the Council 
L. Pearsall, E. Pender, C. M. Wilkes H. Battle, A. Seed, M. Kirtland 
Mrs. Marriott Directress Miss A. Barton 

St. Catherine's Chapter St. Elizabeth's Chapter 

Marian Drane President Mary Neal 

Katharine Batts Secretary Anita Smith 

Mary Dall Treasurer Aline Hughes 

Members of the Council 
M. Drane, K. Batts, M. Dall H. Mason, M. Gold, M. Neal 
Miss Shields Directress Miss M. Bottum 

Lucy Bratton Chapter Kate McKimmon Chapter 

Agnes Pratt President Dorothy Wood 

Louise Toler Secretary Eleanor Sublett 

Rainsf ord Glass Treasurer Audrey Stone 

Members of the Council 
R. Glass, L. Toler, E. Bowne A. Stone, E. Sublett, D. Wood 
Miss Sutton Directress Miss F. Bottum 



The Literary Societies 

The literary societies were organized in 1900, and from tlie date of 
their organization keen rivalry existed between tlie members of Sigma 
Lambda and Epsilon Alpha Pi, reaching high-water mark each year 
in the annual intersociety debate. 



40 The St. Mary's Muse 

In 1909 the larger school and the lack of sufficiently large meeting 
rooms to accommodate the increased membership made it seem ad- 
visable to add a third society to the two already existent, and Alpha 
Rho came into being. 

With three societies the question of the annual intersociety debate 
became a moot problem. As a solution first, in 1914, a series of three 
debates with each society debating the other two was tried, and while 
proving successful in 1914 and 1915, it seemed to burden the round 
of the year with too much debate. For 1916 a triangular debate was 
suggested, with the usual difficulties, the necessity for a final trying- 
out being obviated by the substitution of the Shakespearian Pageant. 
Last year, in 1917, the St. Mary's Pageant in honor of the Seventy- 
fifth Anniversary took the place of the debate. 

But with these changes, though possibly not in connection with 
them, the societies have not thrived as they should, and it seemed best 
this year to go back again to the former plan and have but the two 
societies and a limited membership. Alpha Eho has accordingly 
been absorbed by her older sisters, and Sigma Lambda and Epsilon 
Alpha Pi stand again rivals as of old. 

To test the scholarship of the prospective new members, the invita- 
tions to membership were delayed until the close of the first month 
of the session, when the eligible were invited to make choice of a 
society, and old members and new members together enjoyed the 
reception given in honor of the latter. 

As yet arrangements for the debate have not been perfected, but 
the two societies continue to have charge in turn of the Inter-society 
Student Meetings which mark the celebration of the holidays of the 
school year, are taking a share in the editorship of the Muse as told 
elsewhere, and are holding their regular meetings fortnightly on 
Tuesday evenings. 

The officers for 1917-18 are: 

Sigma Lambda Epsilon Alpha Pi 

EsTELLE Ravenel President Helen Laughinghouse 

Katharine Drane Vice-President Novella Moye 

Aline Hughes Secretary Helen Battle 

Rainsford Glass Treasurer Bessie Folk 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 



Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Crdikshank, Alumnae Editor 

St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

HoNORABT President - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

HONORART Vice-Presidents - / ^^- ^- ^"^^ P^ttinger, Raleigh. 

^ Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham. 
President _ _ _ _ Mrs. John H. Holmes, Chapel Hill. 

Vice-President _ _ _ Mrs. Walter Grimes, Raleigh. 
Secretary - _ _ _ Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer - - - - Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 



The great element of strength in a school is the cooperation of its 
Alumnae. In order for the Alumnne to cooperate they must know what 
is going on at the School. There are many ways in which this infor- 
mation can be obtained, but the most important and obvious is by 
taking the School paper. By doing so they learn the news of the 
School, the advancement that is being made, the plans that are con- 
templated for the future, and the aspirations and hopes of the Rector 
and others responsible for its management. In no other way can so 
many people be reached as through the pages of our School paper. 

I wish to urge upon all the Alumnse that, if they wish to help the 
School, the first thing they should do is to subscribe to the Muse, and 
then that they should read it. They would thus keep in touch with 
us, and would also give us the feeling that we were working together 
in an effective way. George W. Lay, 

September, 1917. Rector. 



The $250,000 Fund 

Everywhere I go I try to emphasize two points which on first glance 
may seem contradictory. The first point is, that the movement to 
secure the Fund is 7iot an Alumnse movement but a movement of the 
Trustees, and therefore of the whole Churcli in the Carolina Dioceses 



42 The St. Maey's Muse 

that own the School. The other point is that the success of the move- 
ment depends very largely upon the Alumnse — that is to say, the 
'product of the School, as well as the present need, justifies the move- 
ment, and the enthusiasm of the Alumnse is the inspiration of the 
canvassers. A good illustration of the practical help of the Alumnse 
enthusiasm was recently shown by the Alumnse of Henderson on the 
eve of the canvass in that town. A fine demonstration of interest on 
the part of the Alumnse such as this in every other place would cer- 
tainly guarantee success. We have reason and right to expect this. 

Francis M. Osborne, 
Special Representative of the Trustees. 



The Program of tb^ M^oderson Alumnae on the Eve of the 
Campaign for the $250,000 fund 

We of the Holy Innocents' Parish, Henderson, IST. C, have just 
completed a very successful canvass for the $250,000 Fund for St. 
Mary's School. 

On the Monday night preceding the canvass the Alumnse of St. 
Mary's gave an entertainment in the Parish House for the members 
of the Congregation and friends of the School in general. 

It was a truly inspiring occasion. The Parish House was beauti- 
fully decorated with autumn leaves and fiowers, and a large St. Mary's 
banner was given a central place in the auditorium. Twenty-seven 
St. Mary's girls took part in the entertainment. We marched into 
the auditorium singing "Ten Thousand Times Ten Thousand" ; not 
a girl present but wished she were back at St. Mary's again, and 
almost felt like she was — for the time being ! Our two oldest daugh- 
ters led the line of march — Mrs. Charles Raney (St. Mary's, 1854) 
and Mrs. W. J. Robards (St. Mary's, 1861). 

The program for the evening was composed entirely of subjects 
dealing with St. Mary's, present, past, or future. 



The St. Mary's Muse 43 

1. Greetings Mary Butleb 

2. Song, "In a Grove of Stately Oak Trees" Elizabeth Coebitt 

3. The Original Thirteen Aline Hughes 

4. Every-day Sketches of School Life — 

Saturday Evening; Sunday at St. Mary's Nellie Rose 

5. Song, "St. Mary's Down in Dixie" Blanche Gregory 

6. St. Mary's — "Alma Mater" Mrs. M. J. O'Neil 

7. Every-day Sketches — 

Getting the Mail; the Usual Occurrence at Lunch Period, 

Frances Cheatham 

8. Sandalphon Mrs. Henry Perry 

9. Song, "Alma Mater" Annie Lee Beck 

We were glad to have with us for the occasion a present-day St. 
Mary's girl, Aline Hughes of the Senior Class, who recited for us her 
original poem which won the prize in the Anniversary Contest held 
at the School last Sj^ring. 

"The Everyday Sketches"- — written by different St. Mary's girls 
while in school — were enjoyed by all. 

''Sandalphon" was given in a charming manner by Mrs. Henry 
Perry, This poem she learned under Miss Czarnomska while at 
St. Mary's. 

All of the songs were St. Mary's songs and were sung by former 
voice pupils of the School. The last one, "Alma Mater," was sung 
with all the alumnse standing, and we all joined in the last stanza 
and sang as if we were really there once again. 

Eev. Francis Osborne, special representative of the St. Mary's 
Board of Trustees during the campaign for the $250,000 Fund, was 
present at the entertainment; also Mr. Graham H. Andrews of 
Raleigh, a Trustee of the School. 

At the conclusion of the alumnse program, talks in the interest of 
St. Mary's and the fund were made by Mr. Andrews and Mr. D. Y. 
Cooper of the Trustees, Mr. Osborne, Rev. I. W. Hughes, our Rector, 
and other friends of the School. 

The pleasant evening ended after hot tea, punch and wafers had 
been served by the alumnse to all in the reception room. 

Maey Brown Butlee, 



44 The St. Maey's Muse 

Greetiogs 

(Spoken to the Henderson Alumna) 

We are all of us St. Mary's girls, and it is in behalf of them that I 
want to welcome you here tonight for just a short time. 

Some of us, of course, were at St. Mary's a much longer time ago 
than others ; but that is no reason why we love our Alma Mater any 
less. In fact, you see we have all the more years to look back on our 
schooldays and keep adding to our love for St. Mary's and everything 
there — but especially the chapel. Somehow the chapel is the heart 
of the School. ]^o matter how much one pretends to fuss while there 
about having to go to so many chapel services, yet in after years it is 
always the chapel around which one's fondest memories cling. 

Many of you may not know that St. Mary's was originally a school 
for boys. Yes, it was ! Don't some of you men wish you could say 
with us, "We went to St. Mary's" ? However, this was only for about 
ten years. Then, may be because it proved unsuccessful, or may be 
because Bishop Ives thought little girls were so much nicer than little 
boys, in 1842 he got Dr. Aldert Smedes to open St. Mary's School for 
Girls. In 1897 under Dr. Bennett Smedes the School became the 
property of the Church, and has been so for the last twenty years. 

It is one of the proudest traditions of St. Mary's that during the 
Civil War it was not only a school, but also a place of refuge for the 
President of our Confederacy, Jefferson Davis, who spent some time 
there with his family. 

St. Mary's celebrated its seventy-fifth anniversary on last May 12th, 
so do you wonder at the many lovely customs and memories that have 
been handed down from generation to generation ? 

The love which we feel for St. Mary's is well expressed in a poem 
by an alumna of 1905 which I will repeat for you : 

When you hear of the School — just as most of us do — 
Of its feasts and its fun — and, of course, lessons, too — 
When you've studied the catalog through and through, 
That's when you dream of St. Mary's. 



The St. Maey's Muse 45 

When you've told all your friends and relations "Good-bye/' 
And have been on the train 'til most ready to die, 
And are tired and dusty and wanting to cry — 
That's when you dread St. Mary's. 

When 'mid rattle and clatter and dust in whirls 
You find yourself in an ocean of girls, 
With long hair and short hair, with plaits and curls — 
That's when you reach St. Mary's. 

When the girls take to hiding in quiet nooks, 
When all around you see nothing but books — 
And "exam week" is plainly announced by the looks — 
That's when you fear St. Mary's. 

When the day comes that's dearest to every heart. 
When you don't know why, but your eyes will smart, 
When the best of friends are forced to part — 
That's when you leave St. Mary's. 

But from early youth till snowy years, 
'Mid a daily round of laughter and tears. 
Through a whole lifetime of joys and cares — 
That's when you love St. Mary's. 

Maby Beown Btjtlee, 1913. 



The Caropaigo Goes oq ir) Spite of the War 

(Reprinted from a leaflet issued by the Committee on the Endowment Fund.) 

War hysteria has affected some people and threatened to suspend 
everything except those things directly connected with the conduct of 
the war. Some individuals seem to think that conditions created bv 
the war place insuperable obstacles in the wav of this campaign. But 
our Trustees, our Bishops, and our Diocesan Councils — in short, those 
in authority — have directed the prosecution of this campaign — and 
there are many good reasons. 

(a) The necessity for the Fund is increased by the conditions grow- 
ing out of the war. 

Up to this time careful management of the institution has made it a 
profitable investment for the Church. But now, on account of the 
increased cost of running the School, due to the high cost of things, 



46 The St. Mary's Muse 

an unusual deficit is inevitable unless we pay the building debt and 
have the advantage of a partial endowment. Such a situation would 
seriously handicap the School. 

(&) There has never been so much money in the cou7itry before. It 
is a truism to say that the time to get money is when there is plenty 
of money in circulation. Every one knows that America is overflow- 
ing with wealth. The enormous expenditures of our Government and 
of our Allies flow through our commercial channels. Every one com- 
plains of high prices, but the fact remains that, except for a few, 
nearly every one has more money and is making more money than 
ever before. Do ive hope for more by ivaiting? 

(c) It is a patriotic duty to malx adequate provisions for our 
schools — especially at this tirne. The United States Commissioner 
of Education, says : 

"It is of the greatest importance that the schools of the United States of all 
kinds and grades — public, private, and parochial — be maintained during the 
war without any lowering of their standards or falling off in their attendance. 

"This is necessary both for the protection of our boys and girls against many 
unusual temptations to delinquencies of various kinds, and that they may 
have full opportunity for preparation for the work of life and for the duties 
and responsibilities of citizenship; all of which will require a higher degree 
of preparation because of the war." 

To further these ideas and keep them before the public, Commis- 
sioner Claxton has appealed to the ministers throughout this country 
for their cooperation, and he says this is a patriotic duty ivhich should 
be performed gladly both for the present defense and, the future wel- 
fare of the country. 

How can the Episcopal Church in the Carolinas better perform her 
patriotic duty in this connection than by making adequate financial 
provision for a school which represents concretely our contribution 
to the education of the womanhood of our section of the country ? 
Here is a very definite chance to "do our bit." We must expec't to 
make sacrifices of our abundant luxuries, and even of our lives, but 
we must not sacrifice the Church and her institutions. 

(d) People are learning to give as never before. The amount and 
number of gifts now being given in response to the special calls of the 



The St. Mary's Muse 47 

times should be of greatest encouragement in this campaign. These 
gifts are both an evidence and earnest of an awakened conscience on 
the part of a people threatened with the sordidness of prosperity. Men 
and women have given to Red Cross work in amounts which they 
have never given before. They will remember the joy that comes of 
giving and, being able, will be glad to give again. The times call for 
many gifts, and the aggregate amount is large, but the per capita 
amount is as yet small and we are far behind the standard of our 
Allies. For example, during the three years that England has been 
fighting for her existence she gave two hundred and forty million 
dollars for Belgian relief. During the same period we were getting 
rich on war profits and gave only eight millions. So we have not 
given ourselves poor as yet — but we are learning to give. 

Dr. Fred P. Haggard of the American Committee for Armenian 
and Syrian Relief, speaking on the basis of long experience with 
benevolent organizations and a study of the financial barometer of 
such organizations in belligerent countries, expresses it as his un- 
qualified opinion that the exigencies of the war will tend to stimulate 
rather than diminish giving. This is borne out by the experience of 
nearly all the missionary and charitable organizations in England 
and Canada during the past three years. 

(e) We must loyally folloiv our leaders. 

For several years the Trustees of St. Mary's School, elected by the 
Carolina Dioceses, have been considering such a campaign. Now they 
have launched this movement and by their personal subscriptions, 
totaling thousands of dollars, given evidence of their sincere convic- 
tions and determination. Loyalty to those whom we have elected to 
this responsible trusteeship demands that we, who own the School 
and elected them to care for our institution, should follow their leader- 
ship and willingly express our approval of their past efiiciency and 
faithfulness by a prompt and generous response. 

(/) To make democracy safe for the world we must be loyal to the 
Church and her institutions. President Wilson says we are fighting 
"to make the world safe for democracy.'' Some one else has added that 
we want ''a democracy that is safe for the world." The only safe 



48 Tpie St. Mary's Muse 

democracy is a Christian democracy. It takes the Church and her 
institutions to make a democracy Christian. If need be, then, even 
in these times the Church must not be reticent in presenting her 
material needs. 

The comparatively small amount asked for a constructive work like 
Christian Education, compared with the large amounts expended in 
the destructive process of war, is to be considered. A nation morally 
and spiritually awakened will see the necessity for both, and will 
neglect neither. It would be a calamity to win a military victory and 
lose the very institutions which have helped to make the Christian 
civilization and Christian homes which we are fighting for. 

The Archdeacon of Raleigh confirms our argument in a concise 
way: 

"Almost every one, whether he be engaged in business or in farming, or in 
some other occupation, is making more money today than ever before. It is 
true the cost of living is higher, and that the Red Cross, war taxes and other 
war demands are asking and requiring much more. But the outstanding 
fact is that we have entered the war to maintain the principles of Christianity. 
If we win a material victory but give up our spiritual aims, we have accom- 
plished nothing for the good of mankind. The world is not one whit safer for 
democracy than it was before." 

The main thing, then, is to get the attention of those who own St. 
Mary's School, even in the midst of these troublous times, and to ask 
them to consider the importance of their action with reference to this 
enterprise. This is a day of opportunity for the Church. She should 
be bold in pressing her claim for loyal and generous support of all 
her institutions. 



THE PRESENT NECESSITY FOR THE FUND 

The ExecTitive Committee of the Board of Trustees Finds That tlie War Has 
Increased the Necessity For and Importance of This Enterprise 

It having been brought to the attention of the Executive Committee 
of the Board of Trustees of St. Mary's School that there is, on the 
part of some, a tendency to regard the raising of this fund of less 
urgent importance than other demands of the times, held a special 



The St. Mart's ItrsE 49 

meeting on September 20, 1917, to consider this matter, and unani- 
mously adopted the following resolution : 

Resolved, That this Committee desire at this time to emphasize the im- 
portance of pressing with all possible earnestness the effort to raise funds, 
for the improvement and development of the School, for the establishment 
of some adequate endowment, and for relieving the School of the incubus of 
the existing building debt. The critical importance of .completing the work 
of raising the $250,000 fund in accordance with the plans inaugurated by the 
Board of Trustees, is even more apparent to members of this Committee at the 
present time than it was a year ago; and we feel that the special committee 
to whom the matter has been entrusted will spare no pains to keep the needs 
of the School before our people, and in every possible way to solicit their 
increased interest and liberality. The largeness of courage and enterprise, 
which proposed this effort to make some adequate provision for the demands 
of the School, has greatly encouraged the friends of St. Mary's. Any declina- 
tion at this time from that high and generous purpose will be most unfavorable 
to the prosperity of the School. Its needs are not such as can be safely post- 
poned. The Executive Committee have confidence in the Committee on Rais- 
ing Funds, that they will at this time, in view of the many demands made on 
our people, not allow this vital matter of the welfare and success of St. Mary's 
School to be lost sight of or postponed to other objects. There is no object 
more important and no duty more sacred than that of maintaining our insti- 
tution for the training of the yoking. We are gladly giving our sons for the 
service of our country. Millions are freely spent to prepare them for effective 
service. We must not begrudge a feio thousands for the training ayid develop- 
ment of our daughters, and their preparation for the more important and more 
sacred duties which devolve upon the women of our land. 



50 The St. Mary's Muse 



Alumnae Weddings 

Swindell-Hales. On Tuesday, July 24th, at Trinity Church, Washington, 
D. C, Lorna Stanton Hales (S. M. S., 1908-09) and Lieut. Dr. Charles LeRoy 
Swindell, U. S. A. M. R. C. 

Royall-Best. On Saturday, August 18th, at home, Warsaw, N. C, Margaret 
Pierce Best (S. M. S., 1915-16) and Mr. Kenneth Claiborne Royall. 

Dawson-Paul. On Monday, August 20th, Lola Almeta Paul (S. M. S., 1915-16) 
and Mr. Frank Gates Dawson. At home. Alliance, N. C. 

Toy-Williams. On Saturday, September 15th, city of Washington, Lena 
■ Child Williams (S. M. S., ) and Mr. Frederick Granville Yale Toy. 

Bultman-Gregg. On Monday, October 1st, at Florence, S. C, Nina Gregg 
(S. M. S., 1916-17) and Mr. John Kustner Bultman. At home, 201 South Coit 
Street, Florence, S. C. 

Green-Barnwell. On Tuesday, October 2d, at St. James Church, Wilmington, 
N. C, Elizabeth Barnwell (S. M. S., ) and Mr. Charles Frederick Green. 

Plant-Moore. On Wednesday, October 3d, St. Pauls Church, Edenton, N. C, 
Pattie Lou Moore (S. M. S., 1907-08) and Mr. William Greenleaf Plant. 

Trimble-Benedict. On Wednesday, October 10th, at Emmanuel Church, 
Asheville, N. C, Hortense Haughton Jones (S. M. S., 1909-11) and Mr. Richard 
Brogden Trimble, 14th Cavalry, U. S. A. 

Broadfoot-Winston. On Thursday, October 11th, at the Baptist Church, 
Selma, N. C, Lizzie Winston (S. M. S., 1912-14) and Mr. William Gillies 
Broadfoot. 

Stockton-Jones. On Saturday, October 13th, at Trinity Episcopal Church, 
Asheville, N. C, Hortense Haughton Jones (S. M. S., 1909-11) and Mr. Richard 
Gordon Stockton. 

Hunter-Montague. On Wednesday, October 24th, at the First Presbyterian 

Church, Raleigh, N. C, Annie Lee Montague (S. M. S., ) and Mr. Clyde 

Harris Hunter. 

Gaither-RoMnson. On Wednesday, November 7th, at Christ Church, Eliza- 
beth City, N. C, Helen Virgilia Robinson (S. M. S ,) and Mr. William 

Gassaway Gaither. 

Jones-Busbee. On Thursday, November 15th, at Norfolk, Va., Susannah 
Steele Busbee, '13, and Captain Charles Jones, U. S. A. 

Foster-Brown. On Saturday, November 17th, at St. Pauls Church, Center- 
ville, Md., Dorothy Madison Brown (S. M. S., ....,) and Lieut. James William 
Foster. 

Wise-Miller. On Wednesday, November 28th, at the Presbyterian Church, 
Trenton, S. C, Fannie Butler Miller (S. M. S., 1910-13) and Mr. Preston Brooks 
Wise, Jr. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Patronize those who patronize you. Remember that it is 
the advertisers who make the publication of the Muse 
possible. 



DON'T FORGET 

TAYLOR'S 

206-10 MASONIC TEMPLE 



KING-CROWELUS DRUG STORE 

and SODA FOUNTAIN 

CORNER FAYETTEVILLE and HARGETT STREETS 



Success in the Campaign for the Raising of the $250,000 
Fund to pay off the debt and provide additional new build- 
ings, and the beginning of an Endowment Fund is of the 
utmost importance to St. Mary's. 

Think of it, talk of it, and help in every way you can. 



B. W. JONES 
The 

Best in 
Groceries 

Phones 667-668 528 Hillsboro Street 



'You get them when promised" 



Hortoh's Studio 

Masonic Temple 



'Workers in Artistic Photography' 



liS^ Mary's ScKooI Uhnrf 



Advertisements 



St, Mary's Girls Always Welcome at 

Hudson-Belk Company 

Full line of Ready-to-wear, Hosiery, Gloves, Furnishings, Dry 
Goods, Shoes, Toilet Goods, Ribbons and Laces 



i 



ESTABLISHED 1858 

H. MAHLER'S SONS 


DOYLAN-PEARGE 

COMPANY 


JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 


The Greatest Store 
in the City for the 

SCHOOL GIRLS 


M. ROSENTBAL & COMPANY 

GROCERS 

Wilmington and Hargett Streets 


SEE 

HERBERT ROSENTHAL 

FOR REAL SHOES 



Teacher — "Why is it, Elizabeth, I always catch you in other girls' rooms?" 
E. B. — "Because you don't knock loud enough." 



Why Is 


MARRIAGE INVITATIONS AND 
VISITING CARDS 


Brantley's Fountain 


CORRECTLY and PROMPTLY Etl6RAVED 

Send for samples and prices 


the 
MOST POPULAR? 


Edwards & Droughton Printing 
Company 


Ask the Girls 


Steel Die and Copper Plate Engravers 




RALEIGH, N. C. 



Adveetisements 



HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
THE WAKE DRUG STOKE 

Phones 228 



HICKS' UPTOWJf DEUG STORE 

Phone 107 
PROMPT DELIVERY 



Thomas H. Briggs & Sons 

The Big Hardware Men Raleigh, N. C. 



Base Balls, Basket Balls 
Tennis and Sporting Goods 



Baleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets. 

PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 

12 W. Hargett St. 

. RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 



Call OLIVE'S BAGGAGE TRANSFER 

Phone 529 

DARNELL & THOMAS 

ONE-PRICE MUSIC HOUSE 

T. F. BROCKWELL 

All Kinds of Keys. Bicycle Supplies. 

Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired. 



Stationery, College Linen, Pennants, 
Cameras and Supplies 
Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 

JAMES E.THIEM 

BeU Phone 135 RALEIGH, N. 0. 

CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE 

FINE CANDIES PURE ICE CREAM 
FRUIT 

We caxry the most complete line of Fruit and 

Candies in town. 

Ill FAYETTEVILLE STREET 



JOHNSON & JOHNSON CO. 

Coal, Wood, Ice, Brick 
122 Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. 0. 

H. STEINMETZ— FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 
Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 



Raleigh, N. 0. 



Phone 113 



CAROLINA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light and 

Power and Gas 

1376— BOTH PHONES— 1377 



WALK-OVER— The Shoe for You 
Walk-Orer Shoe Shop 

RALEIGH, N. 0. 

S. GLASS The Ladies' Store 

Everything up-to-date for Ladies, Misses 

and Children. Ready-made wearing apparel 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

Wm. Heller 

THE FOOTERY SHOP 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Adveetisements 



THE FASHION 

KAPLAN BROS. CO. 
The college girls' store for Snappy, Classy, 
Youthful Garments and Millinery. 

TEN PER CENT DISCOUNT TO COLLEGE 
STUDENTS AND TEACHERS 



ORDER YOUR CUT FLOWERS 

FROM 

J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Phone 149 



^ e. r-l(»^ E &■ 




J Exclusive 
g Millihery 



RALCIGH H.Z 



WHITE ICE CREAM CO. 

BEST 
ICE CREAM 

Phone 123 

CORNER SALISBURY AND HARGETT STS. 



D. K. (crawling out of bed after lights, opens the window). 
F. D. (sleepily) — "Where are you going, Dorothy?" 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company Home Capital 
Safe, Secure, and Successful 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, President 

A. A. THOMPSON, Treasurer 

R. S. BUSBEE. Secretary 


Insure Against Loss by Fire 

Best Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 

Charles E. Johnson, Jr. 

RALEIGH, N. 0. 


HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
SHOES AND HOSIERY 




WATSON PICTURE AND ART CO. 

Picture Frames and Window Shades. 


C. D. ARTHUR City Market 
FISH AND OYSTERS 


SHOES! WHOSE? 
BERNARD L. CROCKER 

124 Fayetteville Street 


ELLINGTON'S ART STORE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Collegre Pennants, Pillows, Pictures, 
Frames, Novelties 


GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 
Fire Insurance 


EOTSTER'S CANDY A SPECIALTY 

Made Fresh Every Day 



Advertisements 



THE YARBOROUGH 



Raleigh's Leading and Largest Hotel 
Dinners and Banquets a Specialty B. H. Griffin Hotel Co., Proprietors 

Jolly & Wynne Jewelry Ce. ^o™e * ro™'^^ 



COLLEGE 
JEWELRY 

128 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 



Plumbers 

Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating 



S. Wilmington Street 



Inquiring Reporter — "Know any good jokes?" 
A. P. (readily) — "Sure; Muriel Dougherty." 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



Premier Carrier of tlie South 



Most Direct Line to all Points North, South, 
East, West 



Through sleeping cars to all principal cities, through Tourist Cars 
to San Francisco and other California points. All-year tourist tick- 
ets on sale to principal Western points. Convenient local, aa well 
as through trains. Electrically lighted coaches. Complete Dining 
Car Service on all through trains. Ask representatives of Southern 
Railway about special rates account Christmas holidays; also 
about various other special occasions. If you are contemplating a 
trip to any point, communicate with representatives of Southern 
Railway before completing your arrangements for same. They will 
gladly and courteously furnish you with all information as to the 
cheapest and most comfortable way in which to make the trip. Will 
also be glad to secure Pullman Sleeping Car reservations for you 

H. F. GARY, General Pass. Agent, J. 0. JONES, Traveling Pass. Agent, 

Washington, D. C. Raleigh, N. C. 



Advertisements 



Hafapette 



A Cafe which invites the patronagre of ladies. The girls of St. Mary's will enjoy 
the beauty and convenience of our modern, well-appointed dining: place. 

Fayetteville Street, next to Almo. 



GET YOUR CHRISTMAS PRESENT 

From 

Roy all & Borden Furniture Co. 



Patronize 

STAUDT'S BAKERY 

Hillsboro Street, Near St. Mary's 

School 



Two Irishmen were crossing the danger zone in the Atlantic. Suddenly 
there came a crash. 

First Irishman (excitedly to his friend) — "Mikey, Mikey! the boat is sink- 
ing!" 

The blase Michael — "Well, what do we care? The boat is not ours!" 



PERRY'S ART STORE 

S. Wilmington St. 


WORK CALLED FOR AND DELIVERED 
BELL PHONE 503 
SHU-FIXERY 


MOORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 
104 EAST HARGETT ST. Bell Phone 719 


J. R. KEE, Manager 103 Fayetteville St. 
RALEIGH. N. C. 

Shoes repaired while you wait. 

Come to Bee our modern plant. 


MISSES REESE & COMPANY 
MILLINERY 


L. SCHWARTZ 
RICHMOND MARKET 

Meats of All Kinds 


BATES-ARRINGTON & COMPANY 
PURE FOOD GROCERIES 



Norfolk Southern Railroad 



ROUTE OF THE "NIGHT EXPRESS" 



Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

DIRECT LINE BETWEEN 



NORFOLK .r!F^f^^^5 



GOLDSBORO 



Via WASHINGTON, KINSTON, GREENVILLE, FARMVILLE 
A.NI> WILSON, TO POINTS NORTH AND SOUTH 



Electric Lighted Pullman Sleeping and Parlor Cars 



Fast Schedule, Best Service 



Double Dailjr Express Service 



Location C entral for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 



St. Mary^s School 



RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women) 



JSrOW m 76th Al^E^UAL SESSIOIST 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TEEMS. 

EASTER TEKM BEGINS JANUARY 21ST, 1918. 



St. Mary's 

offers 
instruction 

in these 
Departments 



1. TEE COLLEGE 

2. TEE MUSIC DEPARTMENT 

3. THE ART DEPARTMENT 

Jf. THE ELOCUTION DEPARTMENT 

5. THE HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT 

6. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL 

7. TEE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 



In 1917-18 are enrolled 250 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Taculty. 

Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. 

Thirty-six Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall aiid 

Dormitories. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without 

slight to the Scholastic training. 

For catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, D. C. L., 
Rector. 

EDWARDS a BROUSHTON PRINTING CO.. RALKISH N. C. 







Cfjrisitmasi J^umber 



ST. MARY'S CALENDAR, 1917-18 

OCTOBER-DECEMBER 



Session regularly opened. 

Reception of Old Girls to the New Girls. In the 
Parlor, 8 p. m. 

Faculty Reception to guests of the city in honor 
of Miss Hester. Parlor. 4-6 p. m. 

Mrs. Vaughn addressed Student Body. 7 p. m. 

Mrs. Vaughn addressed Student Body. 4 p. m. 

Party given by Athletic Associations in the Gym- 
nasium. 8 p. m. 

State Fair. Holidays. 

Muse Party. Muse Room. 8 p. m. 

Literary Society Reception. Parlor. 8 p. m. 

First Faculty Recital. Auditorium. 8:15 p. m. 

First "Pay Day." 

Hallowe'en Party. Gymnasium. 8 p. m. 

Founders' Day. Holiday. 

Class Parties. 

Muse Club Entertainment. "Circus." Gym- 
nasium. 8 p. m. 

Elocution Recital. 

Lucy Bratton Chapter in "Ma Sweet and Her 
Girls." 

St. Margaret's Chapter. Military Ball. Benefit 
of the Red Cross. 

Thanksgiving Day. Holiday. 

Second "Pay Day." 

The Dramatic Club in "A Bachelor's Romance." 

Operetta. 

Christmas Entertainment. 

Christmas Vacation begins. 



September 20, 


Thursday: 


September 22, 


Saturday: 


October 3, 


Wednesday 


October 4, 


Thursday: 


October 6, 


Saturday: 


October 13, 


Saturday: 


October 16-17: 




October 20, 


Saturday: 


October 27, 


Saturday: 


October 29, 


Monday: 


October 29, 


Monday: 


October 31, 


Wednesday 


November 1, 


Thursday: 


November 3, 


Saturday: 


November 10, 


Saturday: 


November 15, 


Thursday: 


November 17, 


Saturday: 


November 24, 


Saturday: 


November 29, 


Thursday: 


December 3, 


Monday: 


December 8, 


Saturday: 


December 15, 


Saturday: 


December 19, 


Wednesday: 


December 20, 


Thursday: 



The St. Mary's Muse 



CHRISTMAS NUMBER 



Vol. XXII 



December, 1917 



No. 4 




T\)z Cbristmas liyn)0 



When the golden glow 

Of Christmas stars is overhead; 

When the earth is wrapped 

In holy, whisp'ring, silent night; 

When the sounds of man 

And work and turmoil all have fled, 

Rings through the air an anthem 

As from angels hid from sight. 

Then that wondrous sound. 

Which sweeps from depths of heav'n to earth. 

Bringing from the stars 

Their echoed note of joy and light. 

Spreads o'er all the world 

The story of that humble birth, 

"Peace, on earth," an echo 

From that Holy Christmas Night; 

Spreads o'er all this world, 

Of happiness, of peace, of war; 

Sifts into the trench 

Where men are fighting, wounded, dead — 

E'en amid the roar 

Of all the instruments of Thor; 

Leaves in each heart the spirit 

Of the true goal, far ahead. 

Mankind fights today 

In blood and horror, bred of war; 

Fights and kills his brothers 

With nothing murd'rous in his mind, 

For the goal of man 

Is neither vict'ry, pride, nor gain, 

But in the words of the anthem, 

"Peace, love — peace to all mankind!" 



A. E. H., "18. 



The St. Maky's Muse 



LITERARY DEPARTMENT 



Edited by the Epsilo7i Alpha Pi Literary Society 

Elizabeth McM. Polk, '18 \ 
Henrietta M. Morgan, '18 y Editors 
Helen Van W. Battle, '19 J 



When Christ Was Born 

Henrietta Marshall Morgan, '18 

When Christ was born the angels. 
Their hearts aglow with love, 

Rejoiced amid the heavens, 
For man might live above! 

When Christ was born the shepherds, 

A-tremble first with fright. 
To Israel brought the message, 

Their King had come with might. 

When Christ was born the mortals. 
Whose hearts were faint with hope, 

Felt in their dying bosoms 
A new-born gladness grope. 

When Christ was born the mortals, 
Whose hearts were pure as gold. 

To Heaven lifted praises 
For prayers asked of old. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Christmas Eve 



Bertie E. Seaa^'ell, '20 



It was Christmas Eve. The snow was falling in soft, feathery 
flakes, dressing every tree and fence in pure white robes. Inside the 
spacious old farmhouse were happiness and good cheer. There was 
a thrill in the air, an undercurrent of excitement. A great fire of 
hickory logs leaped and danced up the wide throat of the chimney 
and cast its bright rays over the glistening mistletoe and scarlet holly 
berries. The pungent smell of bruised pine was in the air. From the 
kitchen was wafted the savory odor of the Christmas dinner. The 
children stole noiselessly around with mysterious packages, or whis- 
pered in subdued tones in excited little groups. A feeling of mystery 
enveloped all. 

The sun cast a flickering ray over the new fallen snow, sank behind 
the horizon, and the day was done. The silver stars sparkled like 
shining jewels in the heavens, and the peace and quiet of the Holy 
Night reigned supreme over the earth. 



The Christmas Eve Darl^ness 



Henrietta Morgan, '18 



Alice opened her eyes with a start. What was that tingling, jing- 
ling noise that sounded far away ? Something had happened, or was 
going to happen; what was it ^ That little jingling must be part of 
it. Oh ! if that big, choking darkness would only go away may be 
she could find out. That darkness made her head spin around. And 
it was so black, so very black. Oh ! — like a flash loomed up the dread- 
ful thought : Bears were out somewhere, and they were going to get 
her ! That was what was going to happen! They might be reaching 
out their big scratchy paws this second ! She covered up her head. 
Why didn't something inside of her stop dancing around I Then — 
thump! Something had fallen on the house. Alice gave a sudden 



The St. Mary's Muse 



start. She was sitting up. She knew now what was going to happen 1 
It was Christmas, and Santa Glaus had been in there where the 
Christmas tree was, jingling the reins she had asked him to bring her ! 

"Suppose he is in there now !" she whispered in awe. Again the 
darkness looked strange. It seemed to be filled with eyes that saw 
what she was thinking. Suppose he was standing right over her ? 

"Oh!" she gasped. Something fuzzy had touched her hand! 
Santa's fur ! Trembling, she fell back. 

"Oh, please, Mr. Santa," she pleaded, "I did not mean not to be 
asleep. It was so dark I couldn't see you. I am a good girl now ; I'll 
never play Mother and Children with mother's new hat any more. 
Oh ! has my doll got yellow hair or brown hair ?" 

ISTo answer. He was there, too, for she could hear him breathing. 
Why was he breathing so hard ? May be he was so tired, after whiz- 
zing up and down so many chimneys, that he could not speak. She 
wished he would hurry up and get his breath. She wanted to know 
if he had ever climbed the North Pole, and if the world had gone 
around so fast that it had tipped him off and he had gone rolling, 
rolling, and come to But where had he come to ? 

"Mew!" wailed a little piteous voice. Alice grabbed eagerly her 
own dear little kitten and hugged him up tight. 

She could breathe now ; the darkness was black, but it was not heavy. 
And tomorrow was Christmas ! Alice was in dreamland once more. 



The Spirit of Christmas 



Helen Battle, '20 



The true spirit of Christmas is the spirit of giving — a giving of 
yourself to others, cheerfully, gaily, yet with an undercurrent of the 
love which prompts the giving. Christmas is not all joy and excite- 
ment. They are but the outer trappings, and often the disguise, of a 
deeper, tenderer feeling, oftentimes embarrassing to show and passed 
over hurriedly, for you shrink from showing the feelings nearest your 
heart, yet which are there and form the foundation of the Christmas 



The St. Maey's Muse 



spirit which you feel and see. That is the spirit of sparkling joy and 
excitement, of a wholesale love and good-will towards your fellow- 
men ; of that atmosphere of holly, mistletoe, blazing, dancing firelight 
reflected on tissue paper and cherry-colored ribbons, of a postman 
trudging through the snow with packages, letters, and cheery Christ- 
mas cards. All this is a bubbling over, an outward expression of the 
deeper spirit of Christmas, felt when on Christmas Eve before the 
lights are lighted, when the darkness ''kind of creeps" up from out- 
side, and the buildings and trees become black outlines against the 
gray sky ; when inside the family has gathered around the living-room 
fire — all tired and almost silent. Here you feel what Christmas 
really means, because as you sit there on the rug before the fire leaning 
against Dad's knee and seeing Mother's face across the hearth by the 
fire, you have time to think and understand what a wonderful time 
Christmas is and what it really ought to be for all. You feel it to be 
a time of giving, not because you ought to, but from a true feeling of 
love and a real desire ; a time of doing little things for others which 
at other seasons are not possible and would not be accepted in the same 
thankful, hearty spirit as when given in the true spirit of Christmas — 
as gifts of yourself, your good-will and your love. 



A Man in the Malting 



Helen Laughingiiouse, '18 



"Hello ! Is that you, McDonald ? Well, Mac, old boy, I'll have 
to call off our little party tonight. Sorry, of course, and all that ; but 
I have a matter of— of — er — business to attend to, and I can't get 
off. Hope I haven't put you out; but I know that you can get some- 
body to take my place. I'll see you at the club tomorrow." With a 
thud the speaker hung up the receiver and walked restlessly to and 
fro. Finally he took a seat near the window, and with a sigh, lighted 
his pipe. 

The room was attractive as only a college man's can be who loves 
beauty, art, and oddity. The large leather chairs seemed to cry out 



The St. Maey's Muse 



an invitation of rest and satisfaction, the books peeping out from every 
bookcased wall issued, as it were, a command to come to them and 
steep jour being in the pleasure of knowledge. The trophies over the 
massive fireplace spoke in themselves of the joys of former tourna- 
ments and combats. The very atmosphere of the place breathed re- 
finement, pleasure, and contentment. 

Even all this could not satisfy its occupant tonight. He was rest- 
less and distinctly worried about something. From the crown of his 
finely chiseled blond head to the tip of his perfectly fitted foot there 
was an air of dissatisfaction. His broad forehead was furrowed with 
wrinkles, his twinkling brown eyes seemed to have lost their laughter, 
his firm chin was set firmer than ever. Jack Hinsdale was fighting 
the hardest fight a man ever engaged in. He was struggling to see 
himself as he really was, and to make of himself a being worth look- 
ing at. 

He had never thought much about it before ; he had taken his exist- 
ence as a matter of course. He had found life a pleasurable thing. 
He had lived the life of an accomplished and lionized wealthy young 
man about town, and until a few hours ago he had felt that he was 
"as good as the next one," and by investing a little of his inherited 
money in organizations for the help of the unfortunate or frequenting 
the charity balls given by his set he was doing enough good in this 
world. 

"By Jove ! but it seems queer for me to be all shaken up by a little 

bit of a girl ; and yet Oh, I don't know what to think. I guess 

she was right; there isn't enough to me to marry any woman." And 
then his mind wandered oif into the happenings of the only hour that 
he remembered of the day, the hour when he had heard his sentence 
from the girl he loved more than everything else in his whole life. 
Marian was a little fluffy, dimpled creature, but beneath her femi- 
ninity there was plenty of pluck and forcefulness. She had refused 
the best catch in town, and refused him because he hadn't done "his 
bit." 

That night was a memorable one for Jack. It is not the pleasantest 
thing in the world to realize that you are not worthy the name you 
bear ; but sometimes it does you good to reach such a conclusion, even 



The St. Mary's Muse 



if you have to pay for it by many sleepless hours. That was certainly 
the case with Jack, for just before dawn he dropped off into quiet 
sleep, and his last thought was echoed by the old clock in the hall, 
"I'll show her I can be a man. I will be a man! I will be a man!" 

When morning came Jack rose with a bound. While he dressed 
he whistled the newest dance tune so loudly that Hawkins came twice 
to see if he were ill or on the verge of losing his mind. Jack had 
decided to prove to Marian that there was something to him besides 
the styles, and already he was beginning to be happier for it. It was 
later than usual when he came into the club, and everybody was wait- 
ing for him. 

"I say, Hinsdale, what in the world have you been doing this morn- 
ing ? I called you a dozen times. It is about time we were planning 
our little fishing trip. You know^ you and Marian are to help us out 
by your presence at our country place." 

"Sorry, Bob — truly I am — but I won't be here then. You will 
have to count me out." And there was a curious smile on Jack's 
handsome face. He was through with loafing ; he was ready to become 

a MAIS". 

It was not many days before he left his friends, protesting that he 
was crazy to throw himself into the army before he was called. But 
Jack had received his call — received it from a mere slip of a girl who 
had refused to marry a slacker. He had wanted to see Marian before 
he went away, but something kept him from asking for the privilege. 
"iSTo, I'd rather go to her when I have made good." So without even 
saying good-bye, he left his home to go to an Officers' Training Camp 
for three months. 

Don't think that those days of camp life were strewn with roses. 
Far from it. To Jack it meant a readjustment of his attitude towards 
life. His ideas were changed, his very ideals were toppled do^vn to 
be built again upon a firmer foundation. He didn't complain, but 
went about his daily routine with a smile on his face, for he himself 
felt difl^erently ; he realized that he was being made into a Man. 
Training camps can come to mean much more to a man than the mere 
gaining of knowledge as to how to hold a bayonet, and to stab the 
other fellow. Thev can be tailoring establishments wherein vour 



The St. Mary's Muse 



character may be cut, fitted, and made to order. Whether the out- 
come is a credit to the tailor depends on you, and thanks to the jolting 
refusal given by Marian, Jack Hinsdale sought to make a success 
of his job. When the three months of training were over even his 
best friends v^^ould not have known him. He was taller, firmer, 
stronger. He wore his uniform with a graceful dignity that arrested 
the gaze of every passer-by. The greatest change of all was in his 
expression. His whole face showed that he was working for some- 
thing worth while. He was ready to stand by Uncle Sam to the last 
ditch. He was eager to go to the front and show to Kaiser Bill what 
the American soldier could do. Eager, yes; but there was only one 
thing that he wished before. He wanted a furlough of three days 
for Christmas, and he wanted it to see one — the girl who had made 
him what he was. If he could find admiration in her eyes, that would 
be enough. If she would give him the answer that he wished, all his 
labors were not in vain. And he would not go without making an 
effort to get that answer. 

It was Christmas Eve, and the old house on the hill breathed the 
spirit forth into the night. From every lighted window hung a wreath 
of holly that seemed to call out to passers-by a merry greeting. From 
the street could be seen a crackling fire in the great old fireplace, and 
close by sat a dainty young girl knitting for the boys at the front. 
As "Uncle" Amos trudged through the snow-covered path around to 
the kitchen that was savory with the odor of pies and cakes already 
prepared for the morrow, he wondered why it was that she was alone. 

"Dat ain't like Miss Marian; hit sho ain't," he muttered to him- 
self. "But jest you wait tell I has 'sprized her with dis here coffin- 
looking box. Dis here am flowers, and I'll bet my hat." 

He found his way through the house to the room where Marian was 
sitting, thinking, as she knitted — well who can tell of what ? At any 
rate, her contemplations were interrupted by the old servant. 

"Miss Marian, I done brought you dis box what was down to the 
station for you, and I wants to wish you a Merry Christmas already." 

"Thank you very much, 'Uncle' Amos, for both of them. You'll 
find a little package in your usual place in the morning, and I hope it 
will make your Christmas merrier." 



The St. Mary's Muse 9 

Almost before the old man had closed the door behind him Marian 
had the box opened, and her low laugh of delight registered her 
pleasure at what she found there. Yet there was a bit of mystery 
about it, for no card could be found to explain the roses of dainty pink 
embedded in an ocean of green. Finally, however, her search was 
rewarded, for when she held them up again to enjoy their beauty more, 
a long envelope slipped from the heart of them. With eagerness she 
tore it open and read it over. Wliat did that mean ? Slowly her 
puzzled countenance cleared, and finally her whole face was alight 
with happiness, pride, and — yes, there was a softened love note there, 
too, for she had read Jack Hinsdale's commission as captain in the 
TJ. S. A. She held the roses closer now, for they meant more to her 
than all her Christmas. Jack had made good ; he had chosen this way 
to tell her ; and she knew that hers was the first news of his success. 
With the deepest tenderness she kissed the paper. Jack was a lEan 
now, and although he had not come to say it, she knew that still he 
was hers. She had refused him three months ago, not because she had 
not loved him, but rather because her love was so great that she wished 
him to make of himself all that he was capable of being. All the heart- 
ache at his sudden departure and separation was worth it. She was 
repaid a thousandfold by this. 

She was not surprised when she heard a step on the porch, a loud 
ring at the door, and an exclamation from Uncle Jake, "Fo' goodness' 
sake ! ef hit ain't Mr. Jack ! Come right into de front room. Miss 
Marian am awaiting fo' you." He was right. Marian stood waiting, 
shyly waiting, with her arms outstretched. She did not have to wait 
long, however, for Captain Hinsdale had come to claim his own. He 
was A MA]Sr. 



10 The St. Maby's Muse 



A Soldier Boy's Christmas 



Mary T. Yeixott, '20 

A cold and wintry day it was — December's cruel weather. 

There was no wind — a cold so still he scarcely could tell whether 

His feet were numbed or no. He was a soldier, 'twas in France, 

And it was Christmas day. 'Twas said that night they would advance 

Some twenty feet or more, and then — if chance there were a then — 

There'd be a Christmas jollity amongst these noble men. 

But he was young, this soldier boy, and e'en though he was brave, 

And gladly would lay down his life the folks back home to save, 

He could not drive away the thoughts which rose and would not down, 

And how he wished that he could be back in his old home town. 

He saw them there — his mother dear, and saw his father, too; 

And there was little brother and his three sweet sisters who 

Had bravely wished him Godspeed and had never shed a tear 

To weaken his own Spartan bravery by betraying fear. 

Gathered around the fire they sat as always they had done 

At Christmas time, but ne'er before without the eldest son. 

There stood the decorated tree, which last year he had trimmed. 

At thought of it a boyish tear his manly eye bedimmed. 

He saw them there, and in his fancy he could plainly hear 

The flow of conversation, and it seemed so real and near, 

'Twas almost as if he himself were with them by the fire. 

And as it burned and crackled and the playful flames leaped higher, 

He felt the warmth and knew that it was all an awful dream — 

This thing called war; he was at home, surely it couldn't seem 

So real — the fire, his dear ones, now he feels his mother's kiss; 

Now — God in Heaven! 'tis gone, all gone! the momentary bliss 

Is over. He is back in France, and as he wakes he hears the call, 

"To arms, to arms, to arms, ye brave! This night determines all!" 

And so it did, for when his comrades paused, the danger being o'er. 

The soldier boy lay dead. 'Tis all too real, this thing called War. 



The St. Maey's Muse 11 



Christmas — Somewhere in prance 



Jane Toy, '20 



A brilliant moon was shining over the meadow where all was peace- 
ful and quiet. Only the two lines of trenches casting their indistinct 
shadows across the uneven stubble showed any sign of life. The guns 
were silent for the while, though vigilant watch was being kept all 
along both lines. At the upper end of the meadow in a trench held 
by the American forces a man was silently pacing up and down, 
pausing at each observation point to make a careful survey of the land 
between the lines. He was alone on guard at this point, alone in the 
dazzling moonlight, while his companions rested. 

He was quite an ordinary American Sammy. In some way his 
mind would travel back over the old Atlantic to pictures of the night 
of his return, when he should see his little family again and have them 
all about him. It was harder and harder to keep his attention fixed 
on that quiet line opposite in the bright moonlight, as tonight, Christ- 
mas Eve, recollections surged back with almost stifling force. He 
seemed to see his little son, to see all those dear ones across the water. 
He forgot the cold night air, the damp trench, the line in the moon- 
light opposite. He was no longer in France, but in a little town in 
America. 

Suddenly a slight rustle in the grass in front of him aroused him 
from his reverie with a start. A few feet directly in front of him a 
German soldier was crawling warily across the open. In one hand 
he held a small round object, in the other a pistol aimed straight at the 
American. The two men glared at each other while the German 
raised the small black object to throw directly into the trenches behind 
the American where his companions lay asleep. It was a time bomb, 
and he was waiting, with a derisive look on his face for the guard 
facing him, until the time to release it. 

Many emotions surged over the American ; he had not been worthy 
of the trust that was given him ; he had failed in his duty ; his com- 
panions must die for his carelessness. What would they think of him 
back home if they knew ! 



12 The St. Mary's Muse 

The German drew back his arm to throw the bomb, still keeping 
the American well covered with his pistol. Gathering his strength 
for the throw, his arm shot forward. But quicker than he the Ameri- 
can sprang from the trench, struck the big German's arm upward, 
and the bomb was sent backwards, not forwards. The men in the 
trench were awakened by a loud report, followed by another still 
louder, where the bomb had fallen harmlessly in the stubble. 

They found his body lying there peacefully, and with great tender- 
ness the boys carried it back to the trench. 

All was silent. The meadows lay quietly in the shining moonlight 
of Christmas morning. Another man was on guard in the place of 
him who had done his duty. How proud of him they would be back 
home if they knew what he had done for them at dawn on Christmas 
morning ! 



The St. Maey's Muse 13 



SCHOOL NEWS 



NoTember 17 : "Ma Sweet and Her Gals" 

A droll entertainment was given for the benefit of the Y. M. C, A. 
on Saturday night, J^ovember 17th, in the Parlor, by the Lucj Brat- 
ton Chapter of the Junior Auxiliary. It was called "Ma Sweet and 
Her Gals." "Ma Sweet," Elspeth Askew, was supposed to be an old- 
maidish person from New England traveling with her own daughters 
and any other "accomplished" young girls who wished to attach them- 
selves to the troupe. All the members of the Chapter were the "gals" 
who answered in chorus "A^'es, Ma!" whenever "Ma Sweet" called 
upon them to perform. The whole entertainment was well carried 
out. Two solos by Fay White and Jessie Moye, and a clog dance by 
Patty Sherrod, were very good indeed. Among the other enjoyable 
features was an instrumental duet with Florie Bell Morgan at the 
piano and Elizabeth Bowne on the bass viol. Several very entertaining 
choruses were sung, one of which was "Listen to the Mocking Bird," 
sung both "forwards" and "backwards" (the latter accomplished by 
the performers turning their backs to the audience). The entertain- 
ment ended with the round, "Three Blind Mice." 

The audience, a most appreciative one, seated on cushions on the 
floor, laughed until they were fairly weeping with mirth. 

This was the first of the Chapter entertainments, and if the others 
are as good, St. Mary's has seven delightful evenings in store. 

H. V. B. 
Noyember 24: Soldiers and Sailors Ball 

On Saturday night, JSTovember 24th, St. Margaret's Chapter gave 
a "Soldiers and Sailors Ball" for the benefit of the American Red 
Cross. There was a large gathering of girls in sailor and soldier uni- 
forms, accompanied by dainty Bed Cross nurses. 

The dancing began about 8 :30 and continued merrily throughout 
the evening. On the side were sold ice-cream and sandwiches. One 
feature of the evening was a competitive dance among the best dancers 
on the floor, a prize being given to the couple chosen by the judges 



14 The St. Mary's Muse 

as the most graceful dancers. The last two couples on the floor were 
Maud Moss with Mollie Taliaferro and Dorothy Powell with Mar- 
garet Springs, who were compelled to dance for some time before the 
judges could make a decision, so close was the contest ; but the de- 
cision was finally in favor of Maud Moss and Mollie Taliaferro. Then 
there followed a thrilling Lucky Number dance, won by Jane Ruffin 
and partner. Dorothy Wood and Edith Inglesby on ukuleles, and 
Leila Meggs on the Hawaiian guitar gave a delightful musical number 
which was greatly enjoyed. 

Many compliments were paid St. Margaret's Chapter for the in- 
genuity and originality displayed in the carrying out of the ball which 
was such a great pleasure to both participants and spectators. 

E. B. L. 

IVovember 29: Thanksgiving Day Meeting. Captain Allen's Talk 

A patriotic meeting was held in the Parlor immediately after din- 
ner on Thanksgiving Day. The meeting was opened by the singing 
of Alma Mater by the School, after which Maud Moss read President 
Wilson's Thanksgiving Day Proclamation, and Mary Wilson read 
"Our Thanksgiving" from Trench and Camp, a paper issued in the 
various cantonments and ISTational Guard camps all over the United 
States. "The Star-Spangled Banner" was sung at the conclusion of 
a most interesting meeting. 

Capt. J. Stuart Allen, who is in charge of the military training at 
the University of North Carolina, and with whom St. Mary's girls 
were already acquainted, spoke to the girls in the School room later. 
His address was deeply interesting, especially his portrayal of trench 
warfare and his account of the Russian situation. His time was 
limited, and we feel that he had much more information and intensely 
interesting news "up his sleeve" which we trust that he will have an 
opportunity in the near future of presenting to us as graphically and 
vividly as what he has already given us. 

We all feel it a great privilege to hear Captain Allen, one who has 
really been "Over There" in the front line trenches, and to learn of 



The St. Maey's Muse 15 

his personal experiences. His accounts give us a better knowledge 
of the great war as it is experienced by those who have been in the 
midst of the fighting in France, and a deeper appreciation of just what 
it all means to ''our boys" who are leaving on the transports every day 
to face those same experiences on the' Western Front in Italy, and 
elsewhere. 

In the smooth, natural run of our school life we are apt not to 
realize the greatness of the age in which we are living, nor appreciate 
the momentous issues of the great war as we should, and we trust 
that there may be many occasions throughout the year when we shall 
be given a personal glimpse of what is going on "Over There," that 
we may more fully be brought to realize these things. 

E. B. L. 
November 29: First Team Basket-ball Game 

The second game between the first teams of the Sigma and Mu 
Athletic Associations was played on Thanksgiving Day. It was an 
exciting game, and became more exciting as the time passed. At the 
end of the second half the score was a tie. When the tie was played 
off the Mus won by one goal. Both teams showed a great deal of 
"pep" and fighting spirit, and much enthusiasm was shown on the 
side lines by the spectators, who cheered heartily for their respective 
sides. 

The position of the players on the teams was as follows : 

Mu Sigma 

Cabell forward (Capt.) Waddell 

McMullan forward Scott 

Lay, E jumjnng center Ravenel 

Powell side center Mullins 

Burke ( Capt. ) guard Chavasse 

Glass guard Battle 

December 3: Second Team Basket-ball Game 

The Second Basketball teams were organized December 1st and 
the first game between the Sigmas and Mus was played Monday, De- 



16 The St. Mary's Muse 

cember 3d. Both teams are strong and the team work admirable. 
The Mus won with a score of 14-4. The players were as follows : 

Sigma Mu 

Parks forward ( Capt. ) Kern 

Farmer forward Lay, N. 

Batts jumping center Askew 

Higgs side center Sublett 

Toy guard Yellott 

Ambler (Capt.) guard Barnard 

Most of the game was played in the rain, but this did not dampen the 
enthusiasm of either players or spectators. The playing was good 
and the yells and songs from the side lines were full of spirit. 

December 8: Dramatic Club Play 

The Dramatic Club made its annual fall appearance in the St. 
Mary's Auditorium on the evening of Saturday, December 8th. 
Under the direction of Miss Davis this event has come to be looked 
forward to as one of the special pleasures of the year, and this year's 
production measured well up to preceding ones. The play was Martha 
Morton's comedy, "A Bachelor's Romance," and with its modern 
atmosphere and eighteenth century costumes, and its multiple ro- 
mances, it made a strong appeal to the audience. 

The principal parts, those of the elderly hero and his youthful 
ward, who prefers him to younger suitors, were taken by Aline Hughes 
and Mary C. Wilson. Both have acquitted themselves well in past 
performances at St. Mary's and both were at their best in this year's 
play. They were supported well by the other members of the cast, 
with the honors going to Dorothy Kirtland, as Miss Clemantina, and 
Millicent Blanton, the gallant younger brother. 

The play again displayed Miss Davis's skill in casting the charac- 
ters, in arranging the settings and costumes, and in the general 
training. 

The proceeds of the play were for the Y. W. C. A. Fund, and it 
was the one regrettable incident to the occasion that they were not 
larger. 



The St. Mary's Muse 17 



The program in full follows : 

"A BACHELOR'S ROMANCE" 

A Comedy in Four Acts 
By Martha Morton 



PRESENTED BY 

THE DRAMATIC CLUB 
Under the Direction of Miss Florence C. Davis 



Characters 

David Holmes, Literary Critic on The Review Aline Hughes 

Gerald Holmes, Ms brother, pleasure-loving man of the world 

MiLLICENT BlANTON 

Martin Beggs, David's secretary and confidential man Ellen Lay 

Harold Reynolds, on the staff of The Review Dorothy Wood 

Mr. Mulberry, a literary man, with a classical education which he cannot 

turn into m,oney Mary Dall 

Savage, a modern literary man Ruth Russell 

Miss Clemantina, a maiden lady with a sharp tongue Dorothy Kirtland 

Helen LeGrand, David's sister Alice Seed 

Harriet Leicester, a society girl Jule Saffold 

Sylvia Somers, David's ward Mary C. Wilson 

James, a flunkey Katherine White 



Synopsis 

ACT I — David's study. 

ACT II — Helen's home, Grosvenor Square, the following evening. 

ACT III — David's study, eight months later. 

ACT IV — Clemantina's home in Edgware, near London, two months later. 



The period of the play is about 1750. 



December 10 : Arthur Hackett, Tenor 



The Peace-St. Mary's Concert Series of 1917-18 was opened aus- 
piciously on the evening of Monday, December 12th. Peace and 
St. Mary's were both out in force and a very appreciative audience 
greeted Mr. Hackett. 

"M. A. D." writes of the concert: 

Arthur Hackett appeared last night in the first recital of the Peace-St. 
Mary's Concert Series for the season 1917-18. Mr. Hackett captured his audi- 



18 The St. Mary's Muse 

ence with the opening number, which was a group of Irish folk-songs, "The 
Foggy Dew," "My Snowy-breasted Pearl," "The Low-backed Car." The singer 
revealed a rich melodious tenor of exceptional beauty, with the power to stir 
the emotions and speak direct to the hearts of his hearers. 

The French group which followed was a triumph of brains, tone, and 
musicianship. "Le Reve" from "Manon" especially showed the beautiful 
quality of Mr. Hackett's voice, as well as the finished skill of his style. "D'Une 
Prison" by Hahn as rendered by Mr. Hackett ran the gamut of human sorrow, 
touching the chords of longing, loneliness, and despair. "Ah! Moon of My 
Delight" from the "Persian Garden" cycle was a bit of fine singing, clear 
diction, and ideal interpretation. 

A special favorite with the audience was the (a), (b), (c) number, "Passing 
By" by Purcell, "Requiem of the Sea" by S'teffen, and "Hail Ye Tyme of 
Holiedays" by Branscombe. These were sung with the exquisite simplicity 
and finish of the true artist, and Mr. Hackett responded to the encore with 
"Thou Art Like Unto a Flower." 

Before the closing number of the program, Mr. Hackett announced that 
owing to a late train he had arrived in Raleigh just in time to take his place 
on the concert stage, and he wished to call the attention of the audience to 
"the noble and effective work which the accompanist, Mr. R. Blinn Owen, 
was doing without a single rehearsal, and to express his own thanks and 
appreciation." This was received with applause. 

The program ended with a group of songs by American women composers, 
and proved that our women are not without the divine fire of creative power 
in music. "The Morning Wind" by Branscombe and "Come to the Garden, 
Love," by Mary Turner Salter, were particularly enjoyed. 

And the Raleigh Times said: 

Hackett and Owen in Pleasing Recital 

The initial appearance of Arthur Hackett, American tenor, at St. Mary'e 
auditorium in the Peace-St. Mary's series, was a glorious success for the 
young artist, and a rare treat for the audience of local music lovers and 
students. 

Mr. Hackett's rich tenor voice made a profound impression, as evidenced by 
the numerous encores, even after the last number, according to the program, 
had been sung. Irish folk-songs, others of a French group, and Liza-Lehman's 
"Ah! Moon of My Delight," from "A Persian Garden," were particularly 
pleasing. 

Four songs by American women composers were well rendered. Among 
them was "Coleen Aroon," by Miss Lily Strickland of Anderson, S. C. 

The singer paid a glowing tribute to his accompanist, R. Blinn Owen, with 
whom he did not have a moment's rehearsal, Mr. Hackett's train arriving 
only a half-hour before the recital. 



The St. Maey's Muse 19 

December 15: "An ETCning of Miniature Opera and Minstrelsy" 

The Saturday evening before the Christmas vacation was again this 
year the appointed time for Mr. Owen's "operetta," an event always 
looked forward to with a great deal of interest. Instead of one opera 
as in the past, Mr. Owen this year presented a series of shorter musical 
attractions which made up a varied and very agreeable program. 

The News and Observer said of the evening: 

The approach of the Christmas holidays was heralded at St. Mary's last 
evening by an entertainment full of fun, beauty, and originality. It was called 
"An Evening of Miniature Opera and Minstrelsy," and was received by the 
audience with genuine pleasure, testified by the abundant applause, which 
must have been satisfying to Mr. R. Blinn Owen, who was director of the 
entertainment, and to his assistants, Miss Martha Roberts, piano; Mr. Robert 
Jordan, violinist; Miss Marion Thompson, voice; and the members of the 
Chorus Class. 

The program was in five parts, following in quick succession, each part 
complete in itself and calling for a different mood and different stage setting. 

Part I was Sir Arthur Sullivan's comic opera in one act, "Cox and Box, or 
The Long Lost Brothers." Miss Mary Neal as "Cox," a journeyman hatter; 
Miss Virginia Williams as "Box," a journeyman printer; and Miss Audrey 
Stone as "Sergeant Bouncer," played their parts well and kept the audience 
in high good humor with song and dance, serenade and duet, and amusing 
bits of dialogue, from the moment of their appearance on the stage to the 
spirited trio "Rataplan, Rataplan, Rataplan," which was the finale of the 
opera. 

Part II, under the direction of Miss Mabel Barton, was a group of fanciful 
and graceful dancers, representing the seasons, and were greatly enjoyed. 
These were: (a) Summer, "Butterflies." Dancers, Misses Lawrence, Morgan, 
Raney, Seed, and Yorke. (b) Autumn, "Leaves." Dancers, Misses Cabell, 
Dall, Parks, Robbin, Saffold. (c) Winter, "Snowflakes." Dancers, Misses I. 
Jones, M. Lyon, and E. Mason, {d) Spring. Dancer, Miss M. S. Morgan. 

Almost before the applause had died away, the scene had changed to Part 
III, and the audience was in the land of fair Japan, of bright flowers and soft- 
colored lanterns, listening to the poetical love-making of Haru and Oguri, in 
Cadman's Japanese romance, "Sayonara." The melodies were very lovely, 
now and then suggesting "Madam Butterfly." Miss Marion Thompson as 
Oguri both looked and sang the part, and Miss Clarine Scull as Haru won all 
hearts. "I Saw Thee First When Cherries Bloomed" and "The Wild Dove 
Cries on Fleeting Wing" were specially effective. Then followed the chorus 
of Cigarette Girls from "Carmen," gay in costume and rhythm and very well 
sung by a chorus of sixteen girls, led by Misses Ambler and Askew. 

The "Miniatures," which closed the program, were a novel and pleasing 
feature. A mammoth picture frame stood veiled in the center of the stage. 



20 The St. Maey's Muse 

The veil was drawn aside, revealing a picture which at the magic moment 
stepped down from the frame and sang the song of her time. "Old English" 
was represented by Miss Helen Mason, who sang the ballad of "Barbara 
Allen." The "Old French" by Mrs. R. Blinn Owen, with a group of folk-songs 
of Auvergne. Antebellum days were represented by Miss Hilah Tarwater 
In "black mammy" costume, who sang Burleigh's "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot" 
and "Sinner, Pleas' Doan Let This Harves' Pass." 

Songs for all the children in the world were represented by Miss Jessie Moye 
in a group, "My Mother Said," "Peter Piper," and "Old Chinese Folk-Song." 
"1917" was an effective group of war scenes described by Miss Aline Hughes 
and illustrated by Misses Albertson, Bonner, Drane, Laughinghouse, Parks, 
Powell, and Seed. 

The "Ultra Modern" was the "Queen of Society"— solo and ensemble — which 
was brilliantly done by Miss Clarine Scull and chorus. This was especially 
interesting to the girls of St. Mary's both for its tuneful melody and because 
of its author, Mr. R. Blinn Owen, the music director of the School. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Subscription Price ^ ,,,.,,, , One Dollar 

Single Copies ----,---- Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's 
School, Raleigh, N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the 
editorial management of the Mxjse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF, 1917-1918 

AxiNE E. Hughes, '18, Editor-in-Chief 

senior reporters 
Kathakine p. Dbane, '18 Elizabeth McM. Folk, '18 

junior reporters 
Helen Van W. Battle, '20 Ellen Lay, '19 

Mildred Kietland, '20 Alice Seed, '20 

Agnes T. Pbatt, '18, Business Manager 
Maby C. Wilson, '20, Assistant Business Manager 



EDITORIAL 



"Just think how soon we will be going home for Christmas !" When 
one exclaims this jojfnllj, what happy pictures pop into our minds ! 
First, the night of the Christmas tree, with its surprises, merry 
knocks, and Christmas carols. Everybody is happy then, enjoying 
the joys of the night as well as the prospect of joys to come. I^ext 
come the home pictures full of "visions of sugar plums," such as 
dances, parties, happy times around the blazing fire, and so forth, 
and so forth. 



22 The St. Maey's Muse 

This Christmas is going to be different from those heretofore, at 
least it should be. Even the suggestion we had in Student meeting 
of not giving presents to each other shows that we are thinking about 
what we should make of this Christmas. There are so many, many 
people to whom this Christmas will only bring sad memories that it 
does seem rather selfish, doesn't it, for us to think of nothing but fun 
and the gifts we will receive. We will have fun, of course — lots of it, 
real truly fun — but it does seem that this is the time for us to show 
what we really believe Christmas spirit to be, not what it has grown 
to seem — the real Christmas spirit of giving, not receiving, of love 
and not selfishness. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 



Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Cruikshank, Alumnae Editor 



St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

Honorary President - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

Honorary Vice-Presidents - / Mrs. I. McK. Pittinger. Raleigh. 

I Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham. 

President _ _ _ _ JXrs. Joha H. Hulmes, Chapel Hill. 

Vice-President _ _ _ Mrs. \A'altfT Grimes, Raleigh. 

Secretary _ _ _ _ Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer _ _ _ _ Mrs. Ernest Crxiikshank, Raleigh. 



Mrs. Holrries to the Alumnae 



Dear Members of the St. Mary's Alumnce Association Everywhere: 
I want to get in touch with every one of you, if possible, and I have 
thought that our good old friend, the Muse, would prove the best 
medium that I could find for this purpose. I have the honor of being 
your President for this year — a fact which you would not need to be 
told were we the real, live, well organized Association that I am sure 
we would like to be. That, however, we are not at present ; but it is 
to this end that your Council is addressing its efforts this year, for 
our usefulness to our beloved Alma Mater is a minus quantity without 
proper organization. So we are hoping that in every town where as 
many as three St. Mary's girls can be found, a local chapter of the 
AlumuEC Association will be formed this year. As many as three are 
necessary, for each Chapter should have a chairman, a vice-chairman, 
and a secretary-treasurer. iSTo more than three are required, for three 
can carry out the definite suggestions upon which we are uniting our 
efforts at present. To accomplish this organization, the Council has 
asked me to visit as many places throughout the Carolina Dioceses as 
possible — a task which I have cheerfully undertaken because I am 
firmly persuaded that unless Christian people rally as they have 
never done before to the support of our religious and educational insti- 
tutions, just as the country as a whole is doing to the support of its 
Government, these will, of necessity, be submerged in the crisis that 
is upon us. And what will it profit us if we win the war and lose the 



24 The St. Mart's Muse 

Christian agencies that will make for our spiritual comfort and growth 
in the chastened, but new, world that will emerge from the war ? 

I have already, this fall, visited the following places : Wilson, 
Rocky Mount, Tarboro, Edenton, Elizabeth City, Norfolk, Washing- 
ton, ISTew Bern, Goldsboro, Fayetteville, Rockingham, Monroe, Char- 
lotte, Concord, and Salisbury ; and I want to tell you, old St. Mary's 
girls (of the Smedes regime, say), that love for the School is not a 
thing of our generation only, but I found everywhere girls of today 
who seem to love the place quite as much as we do, though I could 
hardly be expected to admit that it is in quite the same way ! 

The message that I have been carrying from the Council is quite 
simple, but I think it can be seen to be far-reaching. I will summarize 
it briefly : 

(1) Organize — with chairman, vice-chairman, and secretary-treasurer. 

(2) Meet twice a year — on November 1 (Pounders' Day) and May 12 (birth- 
day of the School). 

(3) At the fall meeting accomplish these four things: First and foremost, 
have a pleasant social time together (not forgetting to talk about St. Mary's! ) ; 
elect officers for the ensuing year; collect the annual dues ($1) ; and appoint 
a committee who will make it their business to send in to the School an ex- 
haustive list of the girls in their towns who should receive catalogues — i. e., 
all those who will graduate or otherwise end their course at the high school 
during the next year or two, and also those already at other boarding schools 
(since sometimes girls are known to be dissatisfied with their school). 

(4) At the spring meeting the matter of prime importance is the election 
of a delegate who will attend the annual meeting of the entire Association 
held in Raleigh during Commencement week; for without such a representa- 
tive annual meeting as this would mean the Association is tied hand and 
foot in the matter of taking representative action that might be of value to 
the School. It is suggested also that at this May 12 meeting the Chapter 
might have as its guests the girls whom they wish to see go to St. Mary's 
the following fall. 

With the Alumna thus making themselves responsible for bringing 
the School into touch with its future clientele, and then keeping in 
intimate touch with the School themselves through sending a delegate 
to the annual meeting in Raleigh, good results along important lines 
are bound to follow. 

A departure from the old-time annual alumnal meeting (held in 
the Art Room at the School) is planned for the future. While the 



The St. Mary's Muse 25 

delegates to the annual meeting will be entertained during the period 
of Commencement at the School, it is proposed to hold the Alumnal 
meeting down town — say, at the Yarborough House — to be featured 
by a luncheon, to which the Association will invite not only the gradu- 
ates, but also all the girls who will be otherwise ending their course 
at the School. In the opportunity thus afforded for free expression 
regarding the School, the Alumnse will get in touch with actual con- 
ditions and be prepared to meet the criticisms which no school escapes, 
and can take intelligent action which will carry weight on account 
of its representative character ; and the girls will be inspired by the 
realization that instead of leaving St. Mary's forever behind them, 
they are returning to their homes to unite themselves with an associa- 
tion whose first object is St. Mary's. 

Shall we not have such a meeting as this next May ? I put it up to 
each Chapter to bring it about by sending a live delegate. 

And now a word to the many Alumnae whom I have not yet visited : 
Would you like to have me visit you ? If so, please make it known 
by writing to me, and I will do my best to arrange another itinerary 
to include all who feel that they need my help in getting organized. 

I cannot close my letter without an expression of loving greeting 
to the old and the new friends whom I met in the places already visited 
this fall, and enumerated above. I am thinking of them all indi- 
vidually as I write, though I may not trespass upon my space to 
address them here by name. Their hearty interest and cooperation 
not only rendered my visit in their midst a very real personal pleasure 
to me, but led me to feel that if we can find a like response among the 
AlumnEe elsewhere, our Association can look confidently forward to 
renewed life and greater accomplishment in the immediate future. 

Hoping that I shall be swamped with replies before very long, I 
remain Most cordially yours, 

Emilie Smedes Holmes, 
President, St. Mary's Alumnce Association, 1917-18, 
Address : 

Mrs. J. S. Holmes, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 



26 The St. Mary's Muse 

THE $250,000 FUND 

The Next Canvassing is to be in the Diocese of 
East Carolina 

Canvassing for the $250,000 Fund in the Diocese of North Carolina 
this fall has demonstrated the quality of the patriotism of the people 
of ISTorth Carolina. That is to say, the friends of St. Mary's are 
working for and giving to the Red Cross and the many things vs^hich 
call for time and money this year, but at the same time they are trying 
to maintain all necessary things in our I^Tation's life. In other words, 
they are making sacrifices, but they intend to make it seZ/-sacrifice 
and not the sacrifice of this great educational institution of the 
Church. This is very encouraging. 

Recently another thing has given us courage. Bishop Darst asked 
a representative number of men and women from the Diocese of East 
Carolina to meet him at St. Mary's School and consider the campaign 
in its relation to the Diocese. A goodly number responded. They 
came and inspected the School, The Rector and Faculty gave a recep- 
tion in their honor. They took supper at the School and attended the 
evening service in the Chapel. They confessed they were impressed 
alike with what we have at St. Mary's and what we need and the 
necessity of taking care of the institution by endowment. 

At a meeting of this committee from East Carolina, held on De- 
cember 5th, a resolution was passed indorsing the plan of the Trustees 
to raise the $250,000 Fund, urging the continuance of the effort at 
this time notwithstanding the many calls of the day, and asking Bishop 
Darst to appoint a special committee to cooperate with the special 
representative of the Board of Trustees in making plans for a sys- 
tematic canvass in the Diocese of East Carolina as soon as the canvass 



The St. Mary's Muse 27 

in the Diocese of North Carolina is completed, which will be about 
the 1st of February, The following committee was appointed by 
Bishop Darst : 

Mr. George C. Royall, Goldsboro, 

Maj. E. B. Huske, Fayetteville, 

Mr. Frank Wood, Edenton, 

Mr. C. S. Chamberlain, Kinston, 

Gen. James I. Metts, Wilmington. 

Feancis M. Osboene, 
Special Representative of the Board of Trustees. 



28 The St. Mart's Muse 



ALUMNAE WEDDINGS 



Trimble-Benedict: On Wednesday, October 10th, at Emmanuel Church, 
Athens, Ga., Anna Coates Benedict (S. M. S., 1905-09) and Lieut. Richard 
Brogden Trimble, 14th Cavalry, U. S. A. 

Stockton-Jones: On Saturday, October 13th, at Trinity Episcopal Church, 
Asheville, N. C, Hortense Haughton Jones (S. M. S., 1909-11) and Richard 
Gordon Stockton. 

Randolph-Meares : On Saturday, November 24th, at Asheville, N. C, 
Frances Exum Meares (S. M. S., 1908-10) and Donald Wills Randolph. At 
home, Norfolk, Va. 

McDougal-Park : On Saturday, December 1st, at the Tabernacle Baptist 
Church, Raleigh, N. C, Frances Park (S. M. S., 1909-14) and Capt. James E. 
McDougal, U. S. A. 

Dawson-Taylor: On November — , 1917, at Greensboro, N. C, Mary Eliza- 
beth Taylor (S. M. S., 1912-13) and Capt. George H. Dawson, U. S. A., of Rich- 
land Hills, N. Y. 

Cansler-London : On Saturday, December 15th, at St. Peter's Episcopal 
Church, Charlotte, N. C, Mary Norcott London (S. M. S., 1912-13) and Lieut. 
Edwin Thomas Cansler, Jr., U. S. A. 



(Note. — As the weddings of Hortense Haughton Jones and Anna Coates 
Benedict were confused in printing in the last number of the Muse they are 
here reprinted correcting the error, with the apologies of the Editors for this 
error.) ; 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Patronize those who patronize you. Remember that it is 
the advertisers who make the publication of the Muse 
possible. 

DON^T FORGET 

TAYLOR'S 

206-10 MASONIC TEMPLE 
KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 

and SODA FOUNTAIN 

CORNER FAYETTEVILLE and HARGETT STREETS 



Success in the Campaign for the Raising of the |250,000 
Fund to pay off the debt and provide additional new build- 
ings, and the beginning of an Endowment Fund is of the 
utmost importance to St. Mary's. 

Think of it, talk of it, and help in every way you can. 



B. W. JONES 

The 
Best in 

Groceries 

Phones 667-668 528 Hillsboro Street 



'You get them when promised" 



Hortoh s Studio 

Masonic Temple 



'Workers in Artistic Photography" 



Advertisements 



St. Mary's Girls Always Welcome at 

Hudson-Belk Company 

Full line of Ready-to-wear, Hosiery, Gloves, Furnishings, Dry 
Goods, Shoes, Toilet Goods, Ribbons and Laces 



ESTABLISHED 1858 

H. MAHLER'S SONS 


BOYLAN-PEARCE 

COMPANY 


JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 


The Greatest Store 
in the City for the 

SCHOOL GIRLS 


M. ROSENTHAL & COMPANY 

GROCERS 

Wilmington and Hargett Streets 


SEE 

HERBERT ROSENTHAL 

FOR REAL SHOES 



Too Learned. — "That 'ere Sammy's an educated toff from 'arvard," said 
Tommy Atkins, leaning on his spade. "I'm jolly well weary of 'is learnin' 
too, that I am. We're ordered to throw up trenches along the Marne, and as 
'e picks up 'is spade, th' bloomin' college blighter says, says 'e: 'Well, Tommy, 
come on; it looks like we're infra dig!' And wot I says is: Blarst a college 
education, anyhow, eh?" — Richmond Times-Dispatch. 



Why Is 

Brantley's Fountain 

the 

MOST POPULAR? 

Ask the Girls 



MARRIAGE INVITATIONS AND 
VISITING CARDS 

CORRECTLY and PROMPTLY ENGRAVED 

Send for samples and prices 

Edwards & Broeghton Printing 



steel Die and Copper Plate Engravers 

RAJ.HIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements 



HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
THE WAKE DRUG STORE 

Phones 228 



HICKS' UPTOWN DRUG STORE 

Phone 107 
PROMPT DELIVERY 



Thomas H. BriggS & Sons Base Balls, Basket Balh 
The Big Hardware Men Raleigh, N. C. Tennis and Sporting Goods 



Raleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets. 


Call OLIVE'S BAGGAGE TRAJfSFER 

Phone 529 


PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 

12 W. Hargett St. 


DARNELL & THOMAS 

ONE-PRICE MUSIC HOUSE 


RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 


T. F. BROCKWELL 

All Kinds of Keys. Bicycle Supplies. 

Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired. 



FORCED COURTESY 

I rose with great alacrity 

To offer her my seat. 
'Twas a question whether she or I 

Should stand upon my feet. 

— Cornell Widow. 



Stationery, College Linen, Pennants, 
Cameras and Supplies 
Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 

JAMES E.THIEM 

Bell Phone 135 RALEIGH, N. 0. 



CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE 

FINE CANDIES PURE ICE CREAM 
FRUIT 

We carry the most fonipletc line of Fruit and 

Car.dif'S in tr wn. 

Ill FAYETIEVILLE STREET 



JOHNSON & JOHNSON CO. 

Coal, Wood, Ice, Brick 
122 Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. C. 

H. STEINMETZ— FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Weddin? Bouquets, 
Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



Phone 113 



CAROLINA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light and 

Power and Gas 

1376— BOTH PHONES— 1377 



WALK-O^'ER— The Shoe for You 
Walk-Over Slioe Shop 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

S. GLASS The Ladies' Store 

Everything up-to-date for Ladies, Misses 

and Children. Ready-made wearins apparel 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. 0. 

Wm. Heller 

THE FOOTERY SHOP 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements 



THE FASHION 

KAPLAN BROS. CO. 
The college girls' store for Snappy, Classy, 
Youthful Garments and Millinery. 

TEN PER CENT DISCOUNT TO COLLEGE 
STUDENTS AND TEACHERS 



ORDER YOUR CUT FLOWERS 

FBOM 

J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Phone 149 



f e. r-ir^^ e S' 




^ Exclusive 



Milli 



mery 



RALEIGH M.C 



WHITE ICE CREAM CO. 

BEST 
ICE CREAM 

Phone 123 

CORNER SALISBURY AND HARGETT STS. 



SuEPRiSED. — Bertie (whose motor has broken down and who is compelled 
to ride in a trolley)— "Bah Jove! I had no idea these affairs were so popu- 
lar!" — Judge. 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company Home Capital 

Safe, Secure, and Successful 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, President 

A. A. THOMPSON, Treasurer 
R. S. BUSBEE. Secretary 

WATSON PICTURE AND ART CO. 

Picture Frames and Window Shades. 

SHOES! WHOSE? 
BERNARD L. CROCKER 

124 Payetteville Street 

GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 

Fire Insurance 



Insure Against Loss by Fire 
Best Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 

Charles E. Johnson, Jr. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
SHOES AND HOSIERY 

C. D. ARTHUR City Market 

FISH AND OYSTERS 

ELLINGTON'S ART STORE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

CoUeg-e Pennants, Pillows, Pictures, 
Frames, Novelties 

EOYSTER'S CANDY A SPECIALTY 

Made Fresh Every Day 



Advertisements 



THE YARBOROUGH 



Raleigh's Leading and Largest Hotel 
Dinners and Banquets a Specialty B. H. GrifiSn Hotel Co., Proprietors 



Jolly & Wynne Jewelry Cq. 



COLLEGE 
JEWELRY 



128 Fayetteville St. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



YOUNG & HUGHES 



Plumbers 

Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating 



S. Wilmington Street 



Pretty Familiar. — Professor Fudge — "What do you mean, Mr. Jones, hy 
speaking of Dick Wagner, Ludie Beethoven, Charlie Gounod, and Fred 
Handel?" 

Jones — "Well, you told me to get familiar with the great composers." — 
Musical America. 



SOUTHER 



Premier Carrier of the South 



Most Direct Line to all Points North, South, 
East, West 



Through sleeping cars to all principal cities, through Tourist Cars 
to San Francisco and other California points. All-year tourist tick- 
ets on sale to principal Western points. Convenient local, as well 
as through trains. Electrically lighted coaches. Complete Dining 
Car Service on all through trains. Ask representatives of Southern 
Railway about special rates account Christmas holidays; also 
about various other special occasions. If you are contemplating a 
trip to any point, communicate with representatives of Southern 
Railway before completing your arrangements for same. They will 
gladly and courteously furnish you with all information as to the 
cheapest and most comfortable way in which to make the trip. Will 
also be glad to secure Pullman Sleeping Car reservations for you 



H. F. CARY, General Pass. Agent, 
Washington, D. C. 



J. O. JONES, Traveling Pass. Agent, 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Adveetisements 



^.afapette 



A Cafe -w'hich inxites the patronagre of ladies. The girls of St. Mary's -will enjoy 
the beauty and convenience of our modern, well-appointed dining- place. 

Fayetteville Street, next to Almo. 



GET YOUR CHRISTMAS PRESENT 

From 
Roy all & Borden Furniture Co. 



Patronize 

STAUDT'S BAKERY 

Hillsboro Street, Near St. Mary's 

School 



Two Irishmen were crossing the danger zone in the Atlantic. Suddenly 
there came a crash. 

First Irishman (excitedly to his friend) — "Mikey, Mikey! the boat is sink- 
ing!" 

The blase Michael — "Well, what do we care? The boat is not ours!" 



PERRY'S ART STORE 

S. Wilmington St. 


WORK CALLED FOR AND DELIVERED 
BELL PHONE 503 
SHU-FIXERY 


MOORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 
104 EAST HARGETT ST. Bell Phone 719 


J. R. KEE. Manager 103 Fayetteville St. 
RALEIGH. N. C. 

Shoes repaired while you wait. 

Come to see our modern plant. 


MISSES REESE & COMPANY 
MILLINERY 


L. SCHWARTZ 
RICHMOND MARKET 

Meats of All Kinds 


BATES-ARRINGTON & COMPANY 
PURE FOOD GROCERIES 



Norfolk Southern 



ilroad 



ROUTE OF THE "NIGHT EXPRESS' 



Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

DIRECT LINE BETWEEN 



RALEIGH 

NEW BERN 

GOLDSBORO 



Via WASHINGTON, KINSTON, GREENVILLE, FARMVILLE 
AND WILSON, TO POINTS NORTH AND SOUTH 



Electric Lighted Pullman Sleeping and Parlor Cars 



Fast Schedule, Best Service 



Double Daily Express Service 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 



Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 



St. Mary^s School 



RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women) 



INTOW TE 76tli AirmJAL SESSIOI^ 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 21ST, 1918. 



1. THE COLLEGE 

2. THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT 
St. Mary's \ ^ jn^j^j ^^^ DEPARTMENT 

offers 

instruction { ^. THE ELOCUTION DEPARTMENT 

in these 5^ j^^^ HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT 

Departments / 

6. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL 

7. THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 



In 1917-18 are enrolled 250 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty. 

Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. 
Thirty-six Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and 
Dormitories. 
Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without 
slight to the Scholastic training. 
For catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, D. C. L., 
Rector. 

EDWARDS ft BROUSHTON PRINTING CO.. RALIIOH. H. C. 



maleigfj, ^. C. 




Hate Minter J^umfter 

f anttarp=Jfel)ruar?, 1918 



ST. MARY'S CALENDAR, 1917-18 

FEBRUARY-JUNE 



February 13, Wednesday: 

February 22, Friday: 

February 23, Saturday: 

Marcli 16, Saturday: 



March 


17, 


Sunday: 


March 


28, 


Thursday: 


March 


29, 


Friday: 


March 


31, 


Sunday: 


April 


8, 


Monday: 


April 


22, 


Monday: 


April 


29, 


Monday: 


May 


6, 


Monday: 


May 


9, 


Thursday; 


May 


13, 


Monday: 


May 


18, 


Saturday: 


May 


20, 


Monday: 


May 


25, 


Saturday: 


June 


1, 


Saturday: 


June 


2-4, 





Ash Wednesday. Lent begins. 

Washington's Birthday. 

Lecture by the Hon. Theodore Marburg. 

"Scenes from the Life of a Bible Woman," by the 

St. Agnes and St. Monica Auxiliary Chapters, 

Parlor, 8:15. 
St. Patrick's Day. 
Last Quarter begins. 
Good Friday. 
Easter Day. 

Piano Recital. Miss Louise Seymour. 
Faculty Recital. 

Certificate Voice Recital. Mary Poote Neal. 
Certificate Piano Recital. Dorothy Portlock 

Wood. 
Ascension Day. 

Expression Recital. Alice Creswell Seed. 
Annual School Party. 

Certificate Piano Recital. Helen Clifford Cooper. 
Annual Chorus Concert. 
Annual Dramatic Club Play. 
Seventy-sixth Commencement. 



The St. Mary's Muse 

LATE WINTER NUMBER 

Vol. XXII jAjfUARY-FEBEUAEY, 1918 Xo. 5-6 

These War Times at St. Mary's 

"Have yoii joined ?" 

''Of course!" 

It does not matter what, it is the spirit that saturates St. Mary's 
life today, that whatever organizations are planned to carry on war 
work of any nature they are enthusiastically supported by the student 
body and faculty of St. Mary's. Everybody joins. 

Red Cross work stands out most prominently, perhaps, as it was the 
first which was generally organized through the large First-Aid 
classes held last session. This present session has seen a live and 
successful membership campaign in which 100 per cent membership 
was accomplished in the resident student body and faculty; and of 
course many local students belong also. Following this campaign, 
active work has gone forward in the making of different garments for 
the Belgians and the hospitals, to be followed soon by a Surgical 
Dressing class. The Red Cross finds ready, enthusiastic support, 
whatever its call, at St. Mary's. Of course, knitting is continuous ; 
that is now taken for granted. 

Certainly next, if not so conspicuous in its activity, is the steady, 
unfailing offering in response to many varied calls. The announce- 
ments are made in the Chapel, and a little black box in the front hall, 
with its appeal posted above it, keeps us constantly reminded during 
the week to add a little as we can. To all of these there is a response. 

The Thrift Stamp and War Savings campaign was splendid ! And 
it still goes on and on. Every resident student of St. Mary's, as well 
as many others here, is an active member of this movement. The 
little Dormitory group have organized a Circle of Ten, each to buy 
at least one Thrift Stamp each week. And so the Government meets 
full and hearty support at St. Mary's in the Thrift movement. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



But this is not all ! We are supporting to the best of our ability 
both the Food and Fuel Administrations. Meatless and wheatless 
days and meals are kept unerringly. Only the simplest kind of refresh- 
ments are ever served at the parties, and often none at all. There is 
even a private organization among the students called the Anti-Candy 
Club, a part of the general club of America of that name. The buy- 
ing and making of candy, except perhaps for the soldiers, is forbidden 
for the duration of the war. This is certainly a hard test of a school- 
girl's patriotism and willingness to help lick the Kaiser, but the Anti- 
Candy Club is growing. 

The final movement afoot, which met with tremendous enthusiasm 
when it was announced, is the planting and working of the School 
garden by the students themselves. This is no joke; it means hard 
work, but a healthy, happy occupation for free hours. The outlook 
is bright for success in this as in all the other undertakings to help 
the war here in our little community life at St. Mary's. 



At St. Mary's student, teacher, 

Out in war array, 
'Sammies, poilu, Belgian soldier, 

Do our efforts pay?" 

'Knitting needles, sewing needles, 
Wheatless, meatless day? 

Hoe and rake and watering pot — ?' 
"Keep it up!" they say. 



St. /Vlary's and the Thrift Stamp Campaign 

Ellen B. Lay, E A II 

The purpose of the Thrift Stamp Campaign is not only to raise 
funds for America's war work of 1918, but mainly to allow the man 
of little means to feel that he individually is doing something directly 
for his country, and to teach the American the quality of thrift, so 
necessary to our forefathers in Revolutionary times and today so 
essential to the winning of the great European war in the part we 
take with the Allies. When a small boy refrains from the enticing 



The St. Mary's Muse 



stickiness of an all-day sucker, or from the glamour of the "movies," 
and invests his money so saved in thrift stamps, not only is he helping 
himself to become a better citizen, streng-thening his character by un- 
selfijh loyalty and love of country, but also he is building up the 
reputation of the United States — making its future. 

And thus the Thrift Stamp Campaign was brought to St. Mary's. 
We felt that as one small unit of America we should have an hundred 
per cent ownership of Thrift Stamps. A preliminary meeting of the 
student body was held. Mildred Kirtland gave a brief talk on what 
St. Mary's should do as a whole. The student body agreed that every 
girl, man, woman, and child, white and black, on the place should own 
a Thrift Card with one or more stamps on it, and that everything 
possible should be done to accomplish this end. A committee was 
appointed by Katharine Drane, president of the Senior Class, con- 
sisting of Mildred Kirtland, chairman, Mildred Jones, Elspeth 
Askew, Xancy Lay, ISTina Cooper, Louise Pearsall, Henrietta Mor- 
gan, Mary C. Wilson, Margaret Rawlings, Catherine Batts, Helen 
Cooper, Helen Snyder. In a week this connnittee accomplished 
wonders. 

Today, February 1st, every one at St. Mary's from little Ernest 
Cruikshank to old "Ducky," has started "licking the Kaiser." Every 
resident student, twenty-eight day students, twenty-one servants, 
twenty-four members of the Faculty, and all the Lays and Cruik- 
shanks, own Thrift Stamps. 

Although we have started off well, we have not finished. The cam- 
paign will continue throughout the year. Each girl should buy at 
least two stamps a week, so that by the end of the year we should have 
bought $1,000 worth of stamps. We realize that the Thrift Stamps 
will teach us, the American people, to save in small things, and to be 
thrifty. Most of us, too, realize that "C'est le guerre," and that we 
must give up the little luxuries to which we have been accustomed. 
It will take unselfishness and self-denial for us to accomplish our 
plan by June, but, from our love of country and pride in our boys 
"Somewhere in France" we will and shall accomplish it ! 



The St. Maey's Muse 



LITERARY DEPARTMENT 



Edited by the Sigma Lambda Literary Society 

Makian Deane, '19 1 

Katherine Paeker Drane, '18 h-^^^^^^* 



fl Valentine 

Aline E. Hughes, '18 

Across the sea there flew a missive, 

Wrapped with tender care, 
That no strange eye might see 

What a maid had written there. 

She was aided by Dan Cupid, 
Who the missive sped away 

To remind a distant soldier 
'Twas St. Valentine's own day. 

O'er the great wide sea he sent it, 

Flying over sunny France, 
To the place where those brave laddies 

Hold their very first advance; 

Straight into a great, dark dugout. 

To a brown-eyed hero tall, 
Who was waiting to "go over" 

At the coming day's first call. 

Eagerly he grasped the missive, 
Read the tender message through. 

Thanked God that his little sweetheart 
Of war and horror little knew. 

He had read the little message, 
In a moment snatched from time, 

And as he led his brave men over 
In his heart still rang the rhyme. 



The St. Maey's Muse 



And the message, sped such distance. 

Steeled his heart to brav'ry great: 
Made this Captain risk his own life 

For the saving of a mate. 

Safely did he bring his mate back 
From the land called "No Man's," bare, 

Wounded badly, but still smiling, 
Thinking of his "lady fair." 

His heart kept singing, he grew well, 
Thankful for the message true; 

"Daddy, dear, u no I luv u, 
No nife can cut our luv into." 



Coasting 

MuKiEL Dougherty, '22 

Ding-a-ling ! Ding-a-ling ! 

Margaret Hamilton put down her book and rose to answer the 
telephone. 

"Hello ! Who is this ?" 

"Hello ! Margaret. This is Ray. A number of us boys are trying 
to get up a coasting party for tonight, and I want to know if you will 
go with me." 

"I'd love to go, but my feet get so cold !" 

Ray roared with laughter. 

"ISTever mind, Margie ; they won't get cold again if I have anything 
to say in the matter. We are going to build a bonfire at the top of the 
hill and one at the bottom." 

"Oh ! that is grand ! jSTow I'll go with pleasure." 

"I thought you would. At eight. Goodbye." 

"Goodbye, Ray." 



At eight-thirty that night a crowd of boys and girls stood around 
a big fire at the top of a hill and looked after some boys who had just 
left to make the promised fire at the bottom of the hill. xVs far as 
you could see there was snow; everything looked beautiful in the 



6 The St. Mary's Muse 

glistening outer garments of snow and ice. The fires lighted up the 
whole hillside, which glowed like one big shining ruby. 

Soon the fun began. Each boy took down a girl, who sat in front 
on the sled. Some of the boys who had more nerve and were more 
expert took down two girls at once. Such laughter and other merry 
noises rent the air that old man Hezekiah, who lived in a little hut 
not far away, complained of a dreadful headache next morning caused 
by that noisy crowd. 

The fires had almost gone out and everybody was tiring of the sport 
when some one suggested going to Robert Gordon's house to have the 
promised supper. The move was seconded and carried by many eager 
voices. Oh ! Such a supper ! Such fun ! 

Then they pulled back the rugs, turned on the Victrola, and danced. 
As the town clock struck two the last couple departed, after having 
what was rightly termed "an awfully good time." 



"Our Bit" 

E. S. R., '17 

It's wheatless and it's meatless, 

And with some it's sweetless, too; 
And it's "Give it to the War Fund, 

Don't he a slacker. You!" 
It's a dollar here, a dollar there, 

Just give us all you can. 
For you know it's for your country: 

Would( you fail your Uncle Sam? 

And with us it's give us Muse dues, 

And give it gladly, too. 
For you know the poor collectors 

Have to pay as well as you. 
And oh! we stop and give a sigh 

And say with many a moan, 
"Will I ever stop this giving, 

Even when I'm dead and gone? 
Alas! I'm just as busted 

As ever I could be, 
And still I have not finished, 

For I owe for two or three." 



The St. Maey's Muse 



Well, it may seem hard to us, Girls; 

We may think we're in the mire, 
But just the same our hearts, Girls, 

Are, every one, on fire. 
For some day there will be an end, 

And then how glad we'll be 
That we have done our part. Girls, 

At home and o'er the sea. 



The SlacKer 

Rebecca Baxter, '21 

At first they had called him a slacker. Bill volunteered to go to 
France as an interpreter, but even then many who had professed to 
be his friends still called him a slacker, because he took an easy job 
which could be filled by men less physically fit than Bill. He had 

graduated from V University with the highest honors ; he could 

speak French, German, and Spanish, and was considered one of the 
promising young men of the town. He was exceedingly popular with 
both men and girls, and was to have been married in June to Cath- 
erine Stokes, a very popular and attractive girl. But when the war 
broke out and all the boys joined the different military organizations, 
Catherine found public opinion too strong for her, and broke the 
engagement. Many people had said that Bill was only infatuated 
with Catherine, and he began to think so, too, when she broke the 
engagement as she did ; in fact, he felt rather disgusted with her. He 
soon volunteered as an interpreter, and left for France within a few 
weeks. 

For the first month or two Bill was stationed in Paris, but later he 

was moved to the small town of M , within a few miles of the 

front. The town was in a rather dangerous position, being shelled 
and raided by the enemy Zeppelins continuously. Here Bill acted as 
a "Jack-of-all-trades" ; he helped with the wounded and sick, some- 
times even going to the front with the ambulances to bring back the 
wounded. He was a general favorite with the French ofiicers, whom 
he charmed and delighted with his American wit and humor. 



The St. Mary's Mtjse 



For about two weeks late in August a battle had been raging around 
M . Sick and wounded were brought in every day by the hun- 
dreds, and many were reported captured by the Germans, which was 
considered worse than death itself. Finally there came a lull in the 
battle ; nothing had been gained by either side and the casualties were 
great. 

Some of the officers and Bill were sitting around the fire telling 
stories and seeming as cheerful as possible, when they heard something 
fall heavily against the door. Bill opened the door quickly and a 
wounded soldier stumbled towards him. From his story they learned 
that he had been captured, had one arm cut off and one eye put out 
by the Bodies. Bill had heard much of this horrible treatment of 
prisoners, but this was the first time he had ever seen a victim, and 
he could not help exclaiming: ''Good Lord! man, but you are 
plucky!" 

"Oh, it's nothing. I — I got off easy compared to some of the fel- 
lows," he said brokenly. "Here are some German plans I managed 
to slip. Thank God I could bring them!" 

After handing them the papers, he fell over in a faint and was care- 
fully attended and made comfortable. Bill quickly translated the 
papers and found that the Germans had been reinforced and were 
planning an attack set for twelve that night. 

The General's face was grave as he said : 

"We must warn the boys at the front. It is a dangerous errand, 
but some one must go." 

"Let me go, General. I know the way and I want to go. This 
plucky fellow," he said, pointing at the man asleep in the corner, "has 
made me half ashamed of myself." 

The General tried to assure Bill that he was doina; his bit, onlv in 
a different way, and there was no cause to be ashamed ; but Bill in- 
sisted, and finally the General consented. 

"Well, goodbye, my friend, and the best of luck. I do not know 
what we would do without you American boys." 

Bill told them all goodbye and left for the front. He arrived 
nearly exhausted from struggling in the mud and slime through 



The St. Mary's Muse 9 

which he had had to pass. He was just in time. A short while 
after the Germans opened fire, but they found the French ready and 
waiting. The attack was repulsed and the number of killed and 
wounded was slight. Bill, the slacker, was among the wounded, and 
his wounds were many and painful, but not fatal, though one arm 
had to be amputated below the elbow. But Bill considered that he 
gained a good deal more than he lost, for he won the heart of the 
young French girl who had nursed him. 

One day when Bill was well on the way to recovery she was sitting 
beside him holding his hand in both of hers. 

"I am glad your wounds are not very serious, Billee,'' she said. 
"You will be well soon." 

"And then — " and Bill drew her towards him and whispered the 
rest. 

About a month later Catherine Stokes read in the paper of Bill's 
brave act which had won for him the Cross of Honor, and also of his 
marriage to the French girl who had nursed him back to health. 



O Cavalier! 

(Styled after Will Carleton's "Sleep, Old Pioneer") 

E. W.,'20 

When the springtime buds ai'e showing, 
When the summer sky is glowing, 
Or the harvest-time Is here; 
When the winter blast is blowing, 
You dream, Cavalier, 
Safe within your sheltering home. 
Away from care and strife. 
You do not hear your country's call, 
But lead your peaceful life. 
Wealth and happiness surround you. 
Calm your days, with naught to fear. 
And a selfish arm has bound you. 
See the dying souls around you. 
Awake! O Cavalier. 



10 The St. Mary's Muse 

Over there where men are dying, 
And children's voices ever crying 
For aid from far or near, 
Look! Your country's flag is flying. 
Come! O Cavalier. 

Far away from your sheltering home, 
Amidst the care and strife, 
You must wave that spangled flag, 
Protect it with your life! 
Then we shall ne'er forget about you. 
As our cause so just you clear. 
And even though the world may doubt you, 
Remember, we can't win without you. 
So fight! O Cavalier. 



Mere Manon's New Year 

Aline E. Hughes, '18 

Across the cold snowy stretclies of fields the clustered houses of the 
village seemed to be deserted and quiet, buried under the heavy 
blanket of snow. It was Christmas Day on the calendar, but there 

was very little of Christmas in the hearts of the villagers of C . 

There was scarcely enough food under any roof to keep body and soul 
together, and yet even this was gladly divided to help the boys at the 
front. 

In the home of Mere Manon there was increased sorrow, for her 
Jacques, her one hope, joy, and comfort in life, was lying wounded 
in the hospital. She had received the message sent by one of his 
comrades quietly, bravely, as befitted a mother of France, and in the 
same quiet way had begun preparations for leaving home, for she must 
see her boy once more. 

It was not long before the door opened and a tall girl with great 
brown eyes slipped in to help "Jacques' mother." There were no 
words exchanged between them, for they needed no words. When 
the mother left the little home, she turned to the girl at her side : 

"Marie, pray that Jacques may be spared to his country and to me." 

"Give Jacques my love and — and — " The rest was only a sob, a 
prayer, and Mere Manon set off through the snow. 



The St. Maey's Muse 11 

At the railroad station, some miles oft", there was a long, long wait, 
for troop trains were passing one after another, and the poor, timid 
little white-haired lady was almost lost in the confusion of coming 
and going. As the carloads of English Tommies passed, her thoughts 
would go back to all those mothers left at home. It was very late on 
that cold gray day before a kind official noticed her and established 
her in a very small corner of a suj^ply train bound for the base hos- 
pital where Jacques might be. 

It was late on that blustering Christmas morning before Mere 
Manon dropped off to sleep from exhaustion. She was asleep when 
the supply train was sidetracked to let troop trains pass, and still 
asleep when some accident happened to the engine. When she awoke 
the train was not moving, and on all sides there were only bare white 
fields on which the sun was palely trying to shine. As soon as the 
engine was repaired there were other troop trains wanting to pass. 
And so there was delay after delay until, two days late, the train 

pulled into D , where the base hospital was situated. Mere Manon 

had only brought a very small parcel of food with her, all that had 
been in the house, and when she heard the station called it required 
all her strength to make her poor old aching feet take her out into the 
cold air. She did not notice the dazed stare of the trainman, who 
had forgotten her. but thanked him humbly for the little bit of food 
he offered her. 

It was a long search she had then, a cold, weary one, until her poor 
old body seemed unable to stir a moment longer. But on she plodded, 
asking the same question — for "Jacques Manon." Time after time 
she turned away disheartened, but finally in an old chateau a few 

miles from D , a chateau of a kind French nobleman, she found 

him. 

At her broken cry of "Jacques !" he showed no surprise, but joy 
shone in his face as he smiled up at her from the pillow. 

"]\rother!" he said. "I knew you would come." 

Both were silent for a time : there was no need for words. 

But presently: "Mother, I shall be leaving you alone. I will 
not be here on ISTew Year's Dav." 



12 The St. Mary's Muse 

"I shall be happy, my son, you died for your country." 
It was that night, in the language of the soldiers, that Jacques 
"went west." And on the morning of New Year's Day they found 
his little mother lying with a smile on her face. She had gone to 
spend her "Happy ISTew Year" with Jacques. 



The St. Maey's Muse 13 



SCHOOL NEWS 



December 19tli: The Christmas Entertainment 

On Wednesday niglit, December 19tli, as we entered the dining- 
room for our last supper before leaving for the holidays, we found 
the tables most attractively decorated with tiny Christmas trees and 
paper doilies appropriate for the occasion. Christmas bells were 
hanging from the chandeliers, and the Christmas feeling was in the 
air. Most especially so when all the little trees were lighted, they 
alone lighting up the dining-room, and every one seemed carried right 
into a real Christmas night, as it would be were w^e all here for the 
25th, the happy day itself. 

A surprise awaited us — a surprise that proved one of the very 
nicest imaginable. At the end of our long anticipated Christmas 
supper we were all invited to be in the Auditorium at eight o'clock. 
ISTot a word had leaked out of anything that might be going to happen 
there. What could it be ? An eager throng quickly gathered in the 
Auditorium at the appointed hour, where gay little program cards 
were handed around. It is hard to do justice to the entertainment 
that followed, given by the Seniors. *'Holly Tree Inn" from ''The 
Holly Tree" by Charles Dickens was the program in the form of a 
play in one act. The stage was most attractively set and the costumes 
were in perfect keeping with the time of Dickens' story, cleverly 
gotten up by the girls themselves. Elizabeth Folk and Agues Pratt 
as Harry and iSTora, the little runaways, were the central figures, and 
took their parts in a most realistic way, calling forth much applause 
from the delighted audience. They were ably supported by Aline 
Hughes and Katherine Drane as Jab Cobbs, the landlord, and Mrs. 
Cobbs, the landlady. Helen Laughinghouse as Captain Walmers, 
Harry's father, and Estelle Ravenel as Betty, the maid, and Helen 
Mason as the stableman of the inn, completed the cast. It would be 
hard to say who was best, so well was each part taken. 

At the conclusion of the play, which proved a popular success with 
the girls, there was a rush for the Gymnasium, where the Christmas 



14 The St. Mary's Muse 

Tree was to be held. The tree itself with all its gay decorations stood 
in the middle of the room and festoons from the light directly above 
added color to the scene. Cedar rope and wreathes were an effective 
and important part of the decorations, while the large room was 
lighted with candles placed in each of the many windows. After the 
crowd had gathered a silence fell over the room as in the distance could 
be heard the sound of voices singing the old carol, "^'Holy Night, 
Silent Night." The singing drew nearer and the procession of choir 
girls in white, bearing candles, entered the main door of the Gym- 
nasium. Several beautiful carols were sung, followed by those of 
the little children, and concluded by '^O Little Town of Bethlehem," 
in which all present joined. 

All at once, in the momentary silence that followed, Santa Claus's 
voice rang out from the chimney of the little house in the corner, 
speaking words of welcome. Mary Neal took the part of Santa most 
successfully. He had an unusual number of good knocks to deliver 
for the amusement of the audience. When he had said farewell until 
another year and vanished down the chimney, the lights were turned 
on full and the general Christmas knocks, in the form of letters, which 
have taken the place of presents during war times, were distributed 
by Santa's elves, causing much fun for all. There were bags of candy 
and fruit, also, from the tree for everybody. So concluded one of the 
happiest nights at St. Mary's. 

December 20tli-January 15th: The Holidays 

On Thursday, December 20th, at three o'clock, St. Mary's closed 
for the Christmas holidays, and happy crowds, homeward bound, left 
on every train. 

Things at the School during vacation were quiet and the crowd 
remaining was smaller than for many years. It cannot be said that 
the latter part of the holidays at the School were uneventful, for the 
freeze, the worst cold weather witnessed in Raleigh in many years, 
kept things humming to keep up with the water and steam pipes. 

It was for this reason that the opening after the holidays had to be 
postponed one week. Dr. Lay did not wish to risk the inconven- 



The St. Mary's Muse 15 

iences threatened by the damage done by the freeze, as explained in a 
letter to the parents. Of course, this extra week's holiday added a 
great deal to the pleasure of the girls at home, and it will now be 
made up by an extra week at the closing of the session, delaying the 
Commencement until June 2d to 4th. 

On Tuesday, January 15th, one week late on the School Calendar, 
St. Mary's reopened, and the girls came back, after happy vacations 
filled with many pleasures, ready for school work again. Those from 
the jSTorth told tales of wonderful skating, sleighing, and coasting, 
while those from the far South told of snow on orange trees and flow- 
ers, which had never been heard of, in this generation, at least. 

The new year began well. Very few of the old girls did not come 
back, and we had the great pleasure of welcoming an unusually large 
number of new girls for the Second Term. May this Second Term 
prove as happy and prosperous as the first has been for all St. Mary's. 

January 21: The Red Cross Membership Campaign 

On January 21, 1918, a committee of thirteen girls was elected 
from the student body to run a campaigii to obtain 100 per cent mem- 
bership for the Red Cross in the School by the end of a week. The 
Faculty and girls met the swift campaign with ready response, so that 
by the end of the week every girl and teacher in School, except about 
nine, had either joined when asked, was already a member, or had 
renewed her membership. On Saturday, January 26th, forty-four 
of the day students were members — some joined and some were al- 
ready members. 

The record at present is as follows : 

Members joined at St. Mary's, 1918 75 

Of these, those renewed 12 

Total membership, including Faculty and day scholars 224 

January 21: Dr. and Mrs. Lay Entertain the Seniors 

On Monday afternoon, January 21st, Dr. and Mrs. Lay delight- 
fully entertained the Seniors at the Rectory. The cozy study and open 
fire added a touch of home, to the school girls' enjoyment, and a most 
pleasant social evening was spent with the Rector and his wife. De- 



16 The St. Maey's Muse 

licious refreshments were served by Mrs. Lay, and it was with regret 
that the party broke up. 

January 25th: Mrs. Lay Entertains the Faculty 

On Friday afternoon, January 25th, the Faculty were delightfully 
entertained at the Rectory. On entering the parlor they were wel- 
comed by Mrs. Lay and served to delicious creamed oyster, with olives 
and crackers, while just across the hall in the study Miss Dowd served 
tea, coffee, and sandwiches. It was altogether a delightful social 
affair, and was greatly enjoyed, as entertainments at the Rectory 
always are. 

January 28th: Letz Quartette, Peace-St. Mary's Concert 

On Monday evening, January 28th, the second concert of the Peace- 
St. Marj'^'s Series was held in the St. Mary's Auditorium. The Letz 
Quartette rendered a delightful program. The numbers were unusu- 
ally good, and beautifully rendered, opening with Beethoven's "Quar- 
tette "No. 2 in G major" and closing with Grainger's charming song, 
"Molly on the Shore." 

Judging by the hearty applause and the demand for encores, the 
evening was greatly enjoyed by every one. 

The program was as follows : 

THE LETZ QUARTETTE 

HajVS Letz 1st Violin Edward Kkeineb, Viola 

Sandok Harmati, 2d Violin Gerald Maas, Violoncello 

1. Quartette No. 2 in G major Beethoven 

Allegro 

Adagio cantabile 
Scherzo allegro 

Allegro molto, quasi presto 

2. Quartette in P major Dvorak 

(American Quartette) 
Allegro ma non troppo 
Lento 
Vivace ma non troppo 

3. Andante D'Ambrosio 

La fille aux cheveux de lin Debussy 

Molly on the Shore Grainger 

(Irish folk song settings) 



The St. Mart's Muse 17 



February 1th: Two Basketball Games 

The beginning of the new term in athletics was celebrated by a 
gala-day for the teams. 

On Saturday, February 2d, the G^Tanasium was the scene of a 
most exciting double-header between the first teams and junior teams 
of the Sigmas and Mus. Evidently exams did not leave any bad 
effects on the players, as both games were characterized by unusual 
quickness. The score of the first game was 11-6, and for the junior 
teams 22-15, victory in both cases belonging to the Mus. 

The line-up for the first teams was as follows : 

Sigma Mrs 

Waddell, E. (Capt.) / McMullan (Kern) 

Cooper N. (Parks) / Cabell 

Ambler c Lay, E. B. 

Mullins g Burke ( Capt. ) 

Battle g Glass 

The line-up of the junior teams was as follows : 

Hoke (Capt.) / Wilson, M. B. 

Royster / Dougherty 

Bobbins, R. E c Barwis 

Hawkins, M g Browne, E. 

Collier g Barber ( Capt. ) 

February 9tli: The Expression Class Presents "The Kleptomaniac" 

On Saturday evening, February 9th, a charming little one-act play, 
"The Kleptomaniac," was given in the Auditorium by the pupils of 
Miss Davis's private expression class. As usual with Miss Davis's 
plays, the characters were well chosen. Rebecca Baxter acted very 
well indeed the part of the tearful lady who lost her pocketbook, and 
Dorothy Kirtland, as Frieda, was unusually good, though she had 
taken the part on very short notice. They were well supported by all 
members of the cast, making the entertainment a very enjoyable one. 

The cast was as follows : 

Mrs. John Burton (Peggy) Rebecca Baxter 

Mrs. Valerie Chase Armsby (a young widow) LrcY Wills 

Mrs. Charles Dover (J/o&eZ), a bride Carrie McIver Wilkes 



18 Xhe St. Mary's Muse 

Mrs. Preston Ashley (Bertha) Kathebine Batts 

Miss Frieda Dixon Dorothy Kietland 

Miss Evelyn Evans (a journalist) Jane Toy 

Katie (Mrs. Burton's maid) Mary Moffitt 

February 12th: The Colonial Ball 

On Tuesday evening, February 12th, the annual Colonial Ball was 
given in the Parlor. Promptly at eight-thirty the doors vs^ere opened 
and the colonial ladies in their gorgeous panniered gowns and pow- 
dered hair piled high and glistening with jeweled combs, accompanied 
by their escorts with powdered perukes and frilled coats, entered the 
ballroom, which was simply, but completely, adorned with American 
flags. The grand march, led by Katharine Drane and Estelle Rav- 
enel, as George and Martha Washington, carried the scene far back to 
the days of the Colonies, The old-fashioned figures were the opening 
features of the evening's dance, followed by the Virginia reel and the 
dainty minuet. The minuet was danced by some very small Colonial 
ladies with their little escorts, being Mary Lyon, Eleanor Mason, 
Adelaide Boylston, Virginia Lay, Frances Green, and Isabel Jones. 

The gay throng danced the evening out, the ballroom being filled 
with happy laughter and merry exchanges of old-fashioned greetings, 
with the courtly bows and dainty courtesies of long ago. 

The nine-thirty bell brought this jolly, dancing crowd back to the 
realities of 1918, and to the realization that they must, on parting at 
the door, come back to the prose of today, and that it was the last 
evening of dancing before Lent. Very light refreshments were served, 
for these are war times now, and a very happy evening was ended as 
Colonial maid and escort passed out of the ballroom door. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Subscription Price - One Dollar 

Single Copies --------- Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's 
School, Raleigh, N. C, In the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the 
editorial management of the Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF, 1917-1918 

Aline E. Hughes, '18, Editor-in-Chief 

senior reporters 
Kathaeine p. Drane, '18 Elizabeth MoM. Folk, '18 

junior reporters 

Helen Van W. Battle, '20 Ellen Lay, '19 

Mildeed Kibtland, '20 Alice Seed, '20 

Maby C. Wilson, '20, ^ 

T -,^„ rri ,™ .-in I Assistant Business Managers 

Louise Tolee, 19, r 



EDITORIAL 



Mid-Term Examinations 

Mid-term Examinations are over, and there is one good thing that 
these examinations do for us — that is, they show ns how hard we 
ought to have studied. And then just after these examinations we 
have another term beginning. If we have had a hard time with our 
"mid-terms," we must realize that there are others still to come, and 
now is the time for us to prepare for them. Xow is the time to get 
to work. Let's do it with all our might, and we will accomplish more 
than merely making final examinations easier for ourselves. There 
is lots of fun ahead of us this spring, but there is lots of work, too. 
Let's get down to it and all work hard together. 



20 The St. Mary's Muse 



Plans for Red Cross Wor^ 

At a student meeting held just before Christmas it was decided that 
aside from the general knitting we should take up some other form of 
Red Cross work. 

A committee of seven was appointed, Katherine Drane, Mary Dall, 
Eainsford Glass, Jane Euffin, ISTovella Moye, and Rebecca Baxter, 
with Louise Toler as chairman. 

This committee consulted with the Raleigh Red Cross Chapter to 
see what we could do, and found that we could make layettes for the 
Belgian babies, and hospital garments for the wounded soldiers. 
About sixty girls volunteered for this work, so we have secured ma- 
terials for three layettes, which cost twenty-four dollars, and are ready 
to start work on them immediately. 

Material has been ordered for a Surgical Dressing Class, and this 
class of thirty will be ready to start about the last of February. 

This is a good beginning for the new year's work. Everybody is 
interested, and everybody must help. St. Mary's girls have always 
done what was expected of them ; this time we are going to do more 
than that. It is to be one of the most successful of our undertakings 
in war interests, which we are proud to say have been many. 



Lent 

Ash Wednesday this year fell on February 13th, and Lent at the 
School was begun with an early celebration of the Holy Communion 
on that morning. 

We face this Lenten season with perhaps a deeper feeling of seri- 
ousness than ever before. It is because the reality of this great world 
war in which we have taken the side of justice, honor, and democracy, 
is being brought close home to us at last, now that our boys are in the 
trenches, now that we have lost our first troop ship and some of the 
men on board with the sinking of the Tuscania this month. This 
tragedy has strengthened our determination to do "our all," to put 
every effort into the tasks before us, however great or small, to accom- 



The St. Mary's Muse 21 

plisli that final victory over militarism for the cause of democracy. 
It is in this Lenten season that we will seek strength — a greater 
strength than ever before — that we need now, to face that which we 
must face of struggle, sacrifice, and sorrow in the months, perhaps 
the years, ahead of us before the end of this great war. 

At St. Mary's the free hours during Lent will be used by the girls 
in working towards difl'erent goals of war work. There will be sew- 
ing for the Belgian babies, garments for the hospitals, knitting and 
other forms of Red Cross activity. It is hoped and anticipated that 
Easter Day will find an offering which will be positive proof of the 
sacrifices we feel so glad and so willing to make this Lent, not only 
in the saving of money, but in the giving of time to accomplish those 
tasks we have undertaken as a bit in the world war, a bit which seems 
so little, but counts so much. 



On Sunday, February 17th, at St. Mary's, Mrs. C. T. Patch, of 
Southern Pines, the mother of Anna Whitney Patch, a resident stu- 
dent, was taken very suddenly ill with a stroke of paralysis almost 
immediately on her arrival at the School for a visit to her daughter. 
Mr. Patch and his son were summoned, and arrived Sunday after- 
noon. Mrs. Patch died shortly after midnight. 

The funeral was arranged for Tuesday morning, and Mr. R. B. 
Owen, Dr. A. W. Knox, Mr. W. E. Stone, Mr. J. B. Cheshire, Jr., 
Mr. B. G. Cowper, and Mr. M. DeL. Haywood acted as bearers in 
taking the body to the train on Monday. Mrs. G. W. Lay went on 
with the family to Southern Pines for the funeral. 

The deepest sympathy of the whole School went out to the stricken 
family in their sudden bereavement, a slight expression of which was 
a beautiful floral piece sent by the students and Faculty. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 



Commuiiicatiozis and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Cruikshank, Alumnse Editor 

St. Mary's Alumnse Association. 

Honorary President - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

Honorary Vice-Presidents - / ^"^^ ^- ^"^^ ^'^^^^^ser, Raleigh. 

I Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham. 
President _ _ _ _ Mrs. John H. Holmes, Chapel Hill. 

Vice-President _ - _ Mrs. Walter Grimes, Raleigh- 

Secretary _ _ _ _ Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer _ _ _ _ Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 



PROGRESS OF THE FUND 

Rev. Francis M. Osborne, Special Representative of Trustees 



On Januaiy 15tli a report was made to the Executive Committee 
of the Board of Trustees of St. Mary's School of the progress of the 
Campaign for the $250,000 Fund. The Special Committee on Rais- 
ing Funds, acting jointly with the Executive Committee, expressed 
their satisfaction with the result reported by the Special Representa- 
tive in the canvass still going on in the Diocese of ISTorth Carolina, 
and some present stated that the amount so far raised surpassed their 
expectations — and all this notwithstanding some very obvious ob- 
stacles. 

In February the campaign will begin in the Diocese of East Caro- 
lina, and when that Diocese has been canvassed it is hoped that the 
organization for work in the District of Asheville will be ready for 
work. Bishop Bratton of Mississippi, formerly Rector of St. Mary's, 
will address a mass-meeting in Trinity Church, Asheville, on Febru- 
ary 10th in the interest of this movement. 



The St. Maky's Muse 23 



flLUMNAE WEDDINGS 



Tabee-Saffold: On Wednesday, November 21st, at Montgomery, Ala., Evelyn 
Phillips Saffold (S.M.S. 1913-14) and Lieut. William Audley Taber, U. S. A. 

Thomas-Williams: On Saturday, December 22d, at the Chapel of the Church 
of the Heavenly Rest, New York City, Mary Webber Williams (S.M.S. 
1913-15) and Winthrop Gordon Thomas, Signal Corps, U. S. A. 

Dawson-Beaxton : On Saturday, December 22di, at Goldsboro, N. C, Sadie 
Charles Braxton (S.M.S. 1914-17) and Joseph Green Dawson. 

Bbyaxt-Shields : On Thursday, December 27th. at Trinity Church. Scotland 
Neck, N. C, Nannie Du Pre Shields (S.M.S. 1910-12) and David Franklin 
Bryant. 

Harris-Gary: On Saturday, December 29th, at Henderson. N. C, Annie Ruth 
Gary (S.M.S. 1909-11) and Samuel Rogers Harris, Jr. 

Riddick-Josey: On Wednesday, January 2d, at Trinity Church, Scotland 
Neck, N. C, Nannie Louise Josey (S.M.S. 1909-11) and Newsom Allsbrook 
Riddick. 

Fahriox-Yates : On Saturday, January 19th, Raleigh, N. C, Gladys Eccles 
Yates (S.M.S. 1912-15) and Lieut. Frank George Fahrion, U. S. N. 

Gassoway-Bissette: On Tuesday, January 22d, at Nashville, N. C, Lucie 
Bissette (S.M.S. 1913-14) and Julian B. Gassoway. 

Prichaed-Aethur: On Tuesday, January 22d, at Winchester, Va., Bessie Wil- 
son Arthur (S.M.S. 1906-11) and Samuel James Pri chard. At home, 17 N. 
Market Street, Petersburg, "Va. 

Weight-Telfaie: On Saturday, January 2'6th, at Christ Church, Raleigh. 
N. C, Elizabeth Alexander Telfair (S.M.S. 1910-15) and Lieut. Robt. 
Hazlehurst Wright. 

Read-Buedine : On Wednesday, January 30th, at Trinity Episcopal Church, 
Miami, Pla., Bessie Anderson Burdine (S.M.S. 1912-15) and Lieut. Com- 
mander Albert Cushing Read, U. S. N. 

Perla-Cushman : On Tuesday, February 19th, at The Saville. New York City, 
Rebecca Waddell Cushman (S.M.S. 1903-04) and Leo Perla. 

Malcolm-Whartox : On Saturday, February 16th, New York City, Mary 
Catherine Wharton (S.M.S. 1908-09) and Douglas McKay Malcolm. 



24 The St. Maey's Muse 



War Times 

My Tuesdays are meatless, 
My Wednesdays are wheatless, 

I'm getting more eatless each diay. 
My home it is heatless, 
My bed it is sheetless, 

They're all sent to the Y. M. C. A. 
The barrooms are treatless, 
My coffee is sweetless, 

Each day I get poorer and wiser. 
My stockings are feetless, 
My trousers are seatless, 

But my! how I do hate the Kaiser! 

— Selected. 



When the Day is Done 

I have eaten a bale 
Of spinach and kale, 

And I've never raised a row. 
I have swallowed a can 
Of moistened bran, 

And I feel like a brindle cow. 
I am taking a snack 
From the old haystack 

In the evening shadows gray. 
And I'm glad, you bet, 
At last to get 

To the end of a meatless day. 

— Washington Star. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Patronize those who patronize you. Remember that it is 
the advertisers who make the publication of the Muse 
possible. 

DON^T FORGET 

TAYLOR'S 

206-10 MASONIC TEMPLE 
KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 

and SODA FOUNTAIN 

CORNER FAYETTEVILLE and HARGETT STREETS 



Success in the Campaign for the Raising of the $250,000 
Fund to pay off the debt and provide additional new build- 
ings, and the beginning of an Endowment Fund is of the 
utmost importance to St. Mary's. 

Think of it, talk of it, and help in every way you can. 



B. W. JONES 


"You get them when promised" 


The 
Best in 
Groceries 


Hortoh s Studio 

Masonic Temple 


Phones 667-668 528 Hillsboro Street 


"Workers in Artistic Photography" 



Advertisements 



St, Mary's Girls Always Welcome at 

Hudson-Belk Company 

Full line of Ready-to-wear, Hosiery, Gloves, Furnishings, Dry 
Goods, Shoes, Toilet Goods, Ribbons and Laces 



ESTABLISHED 1858 

H. MAHLER'S SONS 


BOYLAN-PEARGE 

COMPANY 


JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 


The Greatest Store 
in the City for the 

SCHOOL GIRLS 


M. ROSENTHAL & COMPANY 

GROCERS 

Wilmington and Hargett Streets 


SEE 

HERBERT ROSENTHAL 

FOR REAL SHOES 



Judge — "Are you Joshua that made the sun stand still?" 

Colored Prisoner — "No, sah; I'se Joshua what made de moonshine." — Ex. 

"Do you always stutter like that?" asked the doctor, examining the new 
recruit. 

"N-N-No, s-s-s-sir; o-o-o-o-o-nly, only wh-wh-when I t-t-t-talk." — Exchange. 



Why Is 

Brantley's Fountain 

the 

MOST POPULAR? 

Ask the Girls 



MARRIAGE INVITATIONS AND 
VISITING GARDS 

CORRECTLY and PROMPTLY ENGRAVED 

Send for samples and prices 

Edwards & Broughton Printing 



Steel Die and Copper Plate EngxaTers 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Adveetisements 



HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
THE WAKE DRUG STORE 

Phones 228 



HICKS' UPTOWJf DRUG STORE 

Phone 107 
PROMPT DELIVERY 



Thomas H. Briggs & Sons 

The Big Hardware Men Raleigh, N. C. 



Base Balls, Basket Balls 
Tennis and Sporting Goods 



Baleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets. 


Call OLIVE'S BAGGAGE TRANSFER 

Phone 529 


PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 

12 W. Hargett St. 


DARNELL & THOMAS 

ONE-PRICE MUSIC HOUSE 


RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 


T. F. BROCKWELL 

All Kinds of Keys. Bicycle Supplies. 

Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired. 



He kissed the maiden on the cheek, 
And she. without compunction, 

At once proceeded to obey 
The Biblical injunction. 

— Exchange. 



Stationery, College Linen, Pennants, 
Cameras and Supplies 
Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 

JAMES E.THIEM 



Bell Phone 135 



RALEIGH, N. 0. 



CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE 

FINB CANDIES PURE ICE CREAM 
FRUIT 

We carry the most romplcte line of Fruit an d 

Candies in town. 

Ill FAYETTEVILLE STREET 



JOHNSON & JOHNSON CO. 

Coal, Wood, Ice, Brick 
122 Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. 0. 

H. STEINMETZ— FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 
Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



Phone 113 



CAROLINA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light and 
Power and Gas 

1376— BOTH PHONES— 1377 



WALK-OVER— The Shoe for You 
Walk-Over Shoe Shop 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



S. GLASS The Ladies' Store 

Everything up-to-date for Ladies, Misses 

and Children. Ready-made wearing apparel 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. 0. 

Wm. Heller 

THE FOOTERY SHOP 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Adveetisements 



THE FASHION 

KAPLAN BROS. CO. 
The college girls' store for Snappy, Classy, 
Youthful Garments and Millinery. 



TEN PER CENT DISCOUNT TO COLLEGE 
STUDENTS AND TEACHERS 



ORDER YOUR CUT FLOWERS 

FKOM 

J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Phone 149 



e. f-ir-^ e ©• 




J Exclusive 
§ Millinery 



RALCIGH »!4.C 



WHITE ICE CREAM CO. 

BEST 
ICE CREAM 

Phone 123 

WILMINGTON STREET 



Teacher — "Didn't you have a brother in this class last year?" 

SirDEXT — "No, sir; I am taking it over again." 

Teacher — "Extraordinary resemblance; extraordinary resemblance!" — Ex. 



ATLAIfTIC FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company Home Capital 
Safe, Secure, and Successful 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, President 

A. A. THOMPSON, Treasurer 

R. S. BUSBEE, Secretary 


Insure Against Loss by Fire 

Best Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 

Charles E. Johnson, Jr. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
SHOES AND HOSIERY 




WATSON PICTURE AND ART CO. 

Picture Frames and Window Shades. 


C. D. ARTHUR City Market 
FISH AND OYSTERS 


SHOES! WHOSE? 
BERNARD L. CROCKER 

124 Fayetteville Street 


ELLINGTON'S ART STORE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
Colleg-e Pennants, Pillows, Pictures, 
Frames, Novelties 


GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 
Fire Insurance 


EOTSTER'S CANDY A SPECIALTT 

Made Fresh Every Day 



Advertisements 



THE YARBOROUGH 



Raleigh's Leading and Largest Hotel 
Dinners and Banqnets a Specialty B. H. Gri£Bn Hotel Co., Proprietors 



Jolly & Wynne Jewelry Cq. 

COLLEGE 
JEWELRY 

128 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 



YOUNG & HUGHES 



Plumbers 

Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating 



S. Wilmington Street 



A Frenchman was coming up New York harbor on his arrival from France. 
As the steamer neared Fort Wadsworth, the sunset gun boomed. Turning to 
one of the passengers, the Frenchman inquired, "What was that?" 

"That's sunset," was the reply. 

"Golly! it goes down with a deuce of a crash over here, doesn't it?" 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



Premier Carrier of the South 



Most Direct Line to all Points North, South, 
East, West 



Through sleeping cars to all principal cities, through Tourist Cars 
to San Francisco and other California points. All-year tourist tick- 
ets on sale to principal Western points. Convenient local, as well 
as through trains. Electrically lighted coaches. Complete Dining 
Car Service on all through trains. Ask representatives of Southern 
Railway about special rates account Christmas holidays; also 
about various other special occasions. If you are contemplating a 
trip to any point, communicate with representatives of Southern 
Railway before completing your arrangements for same. They will 
gladly and courteously furnish you with all information as to the 
cheapest and most comfortable way in which to make the trip. Will 
also be glad to secure Pullman Sleeping Car reservations for you 



H. F. CARY, General Pass. Agent, 
Washington, D. C. 



J. 0. JONES, Traveling Pass. Agent, 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Advertisements 



l^afapette 



A Cafe which inTites the patronag-e of ladies. The g-irls of St. Mary's will enjoy 
the beauty and convenience of our modern, well-appointed dining' place. 

Fayetteville Street, next to Almo. 



See us for PORCH FURNITURE 
Royall & Borden Furniture Co. 

FAYETTEVILLE, STREET 



Patronize 

STAUDT'S BAKERY 

Hillsboro Street, Near St. Mary's 

School 



Miss Grey — "Do you know a single French word?" 
Bright Freshie — "Oui." 
Miss Grey — "Well, do you know another?" 
Bright Freshie — "Non." 



PEKRT'S ART STORE 

S. Wilmington St. 


WORK CALLED FOR AND DELIVERED 
BELL PHONE 503 
SHU-FIXERY 


MOORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 
104 EAST HARGETT ST. Bell Phone 719 


J. R. KEE, Manager 103 Fayetteville St. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 

Shoes repaired while you wait. 

Come to see our modern plant. 


MISSES REESE & COMPANY 
MILLINERY 


L. SCHWARTZ 
RICHMOND MARKET 

Meats of All Kinds 


BATES-ARRINGTON & COMPANY 
PURE FOOD GROCERIES 



Norfolk Southern Railroad 



ROUTE OF THE "NIGHT EXPRESS' 



ihort Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

DIRECT LINE BETWEEN 



Fl 



RALEIGH 

NEW BERN 

GOLDSBORO 



Via W^ASHINGTON. KINSTON. GREENVILLE, FARMVILLE 
AND WILSON, TO POINTS NORTH AND SOUTH 



Electric Lighted Pullman Sleeping and Parlor Cars 

Fast Schedule, Best Service Double Dally Express Service 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salvhrious. 



St. Mary's School 



RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women) 



]SrOW IE 76th AlSrmTAL SESSIOliT 



session divided into two teems. 

Eastee Term began Jamjaby 21st, 1918. 



1. TEE COLLEGE 

2. THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT 
St. Mary's \ ^ j,^^ ^^^^ DEPARTMENT 

offers 
instruction I ^. THE ELOCUTION DEPARTMENT 

in these J 5^ rp^j? EOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT 
Departments / 

6. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL 

7. THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 



In 1917-18 are enrolled 250 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty. 

Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. 

Thirty-six Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Eall and 

Dormitories. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without 

slight to the Scholastic training. 

For catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, D. C. L., 
Rector. 

UWAIDt • BROUOHTON KIIITINa CO.. •AUIOH. H. C. 



#1 







Carip ^prins Jlumfer 

inarci), 1918 




ST. MARY'S CALENDAR, 1917-18 

FEBRUARY-JUNE 



Ash Wednesday. Lent begins. 
Washington's Birthday. 
Lecture by the Hon. Theodore Marburg. 
"Scenes from the Life of a Bible Woman," by the 

St. Agnes and St. Monica Auxiliary Chapters, 

Parlor, 8:15. 
St. Patrick's Day. 
Last Quarter begins. 
Good Friday. 
Easter Day. 

Piano Recital. Miss Louise Seymour. 
Faculty Recital. 

Certificate Voice Recital. Mary Foote Neal. 
Certificate Piano Recital. Dorothy Portlock 

Wood. 
Ascension Day. 

Espression Recital. Alice Creswell Seed. 
Annual School Party. 

Certificate Piano Recital. Helen Clifford Cooper. 
Annual Chorus Concert. 
Annual Dramatic Club Play. 
Seventy-sixth Commencement. 



February 13, 


Wednesday 


February 22, 


Friday: 


February 23, 


Saturday: 


March 


16, 


Saturday: 


March 


17, 


Sunday: 


March 


28, 


Thursday: 


March 


29, 


Friday: 


March 


31, 


Sunday: 


April 


8, 


Monday: 


April 


22, 


Monday: 


April 


29, 


Monday: 


May 


6, 


Monday: 


May 


9, 


Thursday: 


May 


13, 


Monday: 


May 


18, 


Saturday: 


May 


20, 


Monday: 


May 


25, 


Saturday: 


June 


1, 


Saturday: 


June 


2-4, 





The St. Mary's Muse 

EARLY SPRING NUMBER 
Vol. XXII Makch, 1918 IsTq. 7 



The War Gardeo at St. Mary's 

''What do jou mean hj a 'War Garden' at St. Mary's?" you ask. 
Why, just this : there is a great scarcity of labor of all kinds and 
especially for garden and farm work, and yet Mr. Hoover, backed by 
the President and all good loyal Americans, says plant, and plant 
every square inch of ground available, for ''food will win the war." 
So this spring must see the planting of crops not only on a larger scale 
on the farms, but home produce must be grown in every back yard, 
large and small. St. Mary's has a very large "back yard," and it 
must be planted and bring good results. But the question was, "Who 
shall plant it ? Labor cannot be gotten." Full heartily came the 
response to this call from the girls themselves. They volunteered 
readily and the movement is showing splendid results. 

The volunteers are organized in teams, each girl being responsible 
for her own presence, or that of a substitute, on certain days of the 
week, so that each day there will be at least twenty girls working after 
school hours. Miss Lee is the director and is in the field of action at 
all times. So far a uniform has not been hit upon for the farmers, 
but g}Tnnasium suits prove a practical costume, with large straw hats 
for the sunny days. 

The work goes on with great vigor, and farming has not only be- 
come a fad but a pleasure and an enthusiastic bit of war work at 
St. Mary's. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



LITERARY DEPARTMENT 

Edited by the Epsilon Alpha Pi Literary Society 



ElLIZABETH MoM. FOLK, '18 j 

Henrietta M. Morgan, '18 I Editors. 
Helen Van W. Battle, '19 ) 



After High School, Wl^at? 

Jane Toy, '21 

Patriotism is being brought before us today more strongly than 
ever before, and each of us is trying to give the best in us to the com- 
mon cause, our country. To the boys who are in military training, 
to those who have enlisted, and to others immediately connected with 
the struggle there is no question as to the method of serving the 
ISTation most effectively ; but to the young girls of today, especially to 
those just graduating from high school, a question presents itself as 
to whether it is more patriotic to take up some short vocational train- 
ing or to go to college. By going to college we mean a recognized 
institution, a junior college, or an "A" college, and there to take an 
academic course, while by a vocational course we mean taking only 
the training necessary for a special work to be immediately taken up 
in a short time. By either of these methods of training the high 
school graduate will render service to the I^ation. But after careful 
consideration, is it not evident that the greater service will be ren- 
dered in taking the college course ? For three reasons this seems 
true, and we should urge young high school graduates to carefully 
consider these reasons before being influenced through an over-zealous 
but shortsighted feeling of patriotism to take the vocational course. 

To begin with, the average girl graduating from high school is too 
young to choose intelligently her life work. Her mind is not fully 
developed, and she does not really know herself. Further training 
is needed to bring out those qualities which should influence the 
choice of a life work, and a college course furnishes just this training. 



The St. Maky's Muse 



Then, after the four years spent in gaining knowledge, culture, and 
mental training, the college graduate has learned to know herself and 
can readily choose the work for which she is best fitted by nature. 
And in this work she can render a most effective and efficient service 
to the ISTation. 

As well as preparing herself to be of the most effectual service 
possible, the girl who takes the college course is preparing herself to 
meet the country's greatest need. It is true that the call for voca- 
tional workers is great today, but this call is not for girls so young. 
It is for the older women, for those who have been idle and those who 
have completed their education and taken up no profession. Their 
work is here today, but the work of the young high school graduates is 
to be that of the future, of reconstruction after the war, and prepara- 
tion for this task is their duty. In the days of reconstruction that 
will follow the war trained women will be needed for many calls, 
and what particular task will fall upon her the girl of today cannot 
know. I^or can she prepare herself for this task by immediate, hur- 
ried vocational training, but must by a careful college course lay the 
foundation upon which, with perhaps a short vocational training 
later, a career of most capable service can be built for that work which 
is most urgent. 

This career, however, as such, is not the only point to be weighed. 
Aside from professional duties, other even greater responsibilities 
face the women of tomorrow. They are to be the homemakers, the 
community leaders, and for these great tasks they will need the prepa- 
ration of a college education to render the gTeatest possible service 
towards the cultural gro^vth of the community and the home. A 
college education can best give the mental training, the wide knowl- 
edge and broader culture necessary for the great task of making 
homes and leading the communities in the days of reconstruction after 
the war. These tasks are the gTeatest which lie in the immediate 
future of the girls of today, for on the efficient performance of them 
the development of the Xation rests. 

In consideration of these three reasons, we urge the girls who are 
graduating from high school to make an effort to go to college. The 
question of expense can be met by any earnest, determined girl, for 



The St. Maey's Muse 



in all our colleges there are opportunities for profitable work. In 
Smith and Wellesley so great is the spirit of these wartimes that on 
practically every door hangs a sign telling the things which the occu- 
pants can do to earn money. Thus the expense of a college course 
can be so materially reduced that it need hardly be considered. 



Easter 

Susan Smith 



Easter! The very name brings to our minds joyous memories — 
memories of flowers bursting into bloom, of birds singing in the trees, 
and of beautiful services in the little churches at home. 

But, will Easter be the same this year ? Can Easter bring the 
same joy and peace when so many of us are separated from our loved 
ones ? The world is full of horror and suifering, and many hearts 
are now feeling their first real sorrow. Some may have lost all hope 
and may have become despondent. To the ears of these we would 
bring the good tidings, "In the world ye shall have tribulation : but 
be of good cheer; I have overcome the world." The world may be 
full of tribulation now, but Christ once for all, on that first Easter 
day, overcame the world; so we, this Easter day, can open our hearts 
and receive Him with joy. 

For a time the world may be full of sorrow, but Christ reigns, and 
where He reigns righteousness and peace must prevail ! 



Tl)e Part tt)at Peggy Played 

Helen Laughinghouse, '18 

Peggy held them up with pride — two perfectly good socks that she 
had knitted with her own hands. Wouldn't Bob be proud of her ! 
She had planned from the very beginning of them the delight that 
they would bring to that big soldier brother of hers. He was tall, 
handsome, and strong, and to his adoring sister the embodiment of 
all that was fine and true. When the call for volunteers came he had 
been among the first to go, just as Peggy knew he would, and although 



The St. Maky's Muse 



she hated to give him up, she was willing, glad, and proud for him 
to play a man's part and go at once. 

She had spent many a happy hour making surprises for him, writ- 
ing long letters to him, and doing all the little things she could to keep 
him satisfied and contented. She longed to help do something big, 
but in her heart she knew that it was just as necessary to have the 
folks at home do their part bravely and cheerfully as it was to send 
men to the front, and she had taken as her bit the job of being cheer- 
ful and keeping those about her cheerful, and incidentally doing all 
she could to keep up the spirits of the boys she knew at the front. 

This was her first pair of socks, and she felt quite proud of herself 
for having conquered them and come out with such glowing colors. 
She never would forget the number of times she had taken out the 
heel of that first one, or the terrible time she had had with the toes ; 
but now she had conquered it all and had two perfect socks to show 
for all her trials. Of course she was proud of them, and as she sat 
musing over her success the postman came, and with a smile and a 
cheery word handed her a letter. 

Before he had barely started on his way again she had torn it open 
and with a smile on her lips prepared herself for an interesting 
perusal of the letter in question — it was from Bob ! 

Slowly the smile left her face, and in its place there came a look of 
disappointment. Peggy read part of it again : 

Now, Sis, I think you are a perfect brick to knit those socks for me, and I 
had rather wear some of yours than anybody's in the world, but I am going 
to ask you to use them for somebody else. You see Tom Coltram is in my 
company, and I have been seeing quite a bit of him lately. He never gets any 
of the little things from home that count so much, and he is very blue and 
unhappy over here. He doesn't like army life, and I believe the reason is 
that he doesn't have the cheerful backing up of the folks at home. I want to 
ask you to do this for me. Sit down and write him a long, jolly, friendly letter, 
the kind you well know how to write, and send those socks along. Tell him 
you are proud that he is in Uncle Sam's employ, that you are expecting him 
to do big things, that you are interested in all that he does, and all that kind 
of thing. You don't know how it helps a fellow in this life we have to lead in 
the trenches. Think it over and you will see that I am right. 

Always, 

Your devoted brother, 

Bob. 



6 The St. Mary's Muse 

After all lier work Bob didn't want her socks ! . . . . But no, it 
wasn't that Bob didn't want them, she knew it wasn't. It was just 
his everlasting thoughtfulness for others less fortunate than he, and 
of course she would write to Tom, and send him everything she had 
if Bob wanted her to — besides, she had always liked Tom, anyway, 
and if she could make him more satisfied she would be glad to do 
anything in her power. 

And so that is how, a month later when the mail was distributed 

in the dugouts of the th Eegiment, U. S. A., somewhere in 

France, everybody was clamoring around a tall, broad-shouldered, 
sandj^-haired soldier to know "who the lady was who sent those rip- 
ping fine socks." "Say, Tom, give me her address," said one; and 
in the other crowd another was heard to remark, "I wonder if she's 
as pretty as the socks she knits — they are the first pair I've seen yet 
that had any shape to 'em. These look like you could honestly use 
'em for what they are meant for, instead of cleaning up your rifle 
with 'em." 

Tom didn't say much, but he held closely the letter that had come 
with the socks, and he found time to read it over many times during 
the day. 

Their part of the trench had been comparatively quiet for the last 
few days. Only now and then was there a shell from the Huns 
stationed only a few miles opposite their own dugouts, and the dis- 
tant thunder of roaring cannon made them aware that somewhere 
along the trench Fritz was playing havoc with their brothers and 
receiving havoc in return. 

It was Tom's night on duty, and so as he watched the yellow and 
green and red geysers of doom as they would spit and sputter in the 
distance, and as he kept a stiff watch for any mischief the Boches 
might pull off nearer at hand, he could not help but find something 
to occupy his thoughts. 

It is not a pleasant thing to take an inventory of j-ourself — to see 
where you are lacking and what you have failed in — certainly not for 
Tom, because he had to admit that so far his life had been a worth- 
less existence. His mother had died when he was only a baby, his 
father had been too full of his business affairs to worry with him ; his 



The St. IMaey's Muse 



sisters had done their duty by him — that was alL He had had nobody 
to appeal to the best that was in him, and so far it had never 
been awakened. Why had a letter, from a little girl whom he had 
known all his life as Bob Stafford's kid sister, stirred him to even 
think of these things. For the first time it occurred to him that 
Peggy was no longer a ''little girl" — she must be eighteen, at least, 
and he always had liked her, too. 

Then he found himself remembering that she was quite pretty. 
He could picture her as she had knitted those socks — her curly brown 
hair flying in the breeze, her large blue-gray eyes overshadowed by 
long black lashes, her tilted nose a trifle wrinkled as she worked over a 
particularly tedious part, but her red lips smiling — Yeggj always had 
a smile, he remembered. It was quite remarkable how many of 
Peggy's characteristics he did remember ! She was a fine little girl, 
and suddenly he longed to talk to her again, to tease her as he used to 
do when he and Bob had been carefree college boys ; but most of all 
to tell her, as he really wanted to, what her letter, her socks, her very 
self, had come to mean to him. And so on and on his truant fancies 
wandered. Some day he would go back across the sea, if he wasn't 
"blown to Blighty" in the meantime, and when he got back he was 
determined that he would have made good, that he would not be 
ashamed to face this one person who had said she was interested in 
him. He would give her something of which to be really proud. 
He would give his life now, if need be, rather than have Peggy 
ashamed of him, etc., etc. 

And while he was fashioning in his mind the way that he w^ould 
come back to his old home, greet his old friends, and come at last to 
find the one to whom he would owe all his success, the vn'ath-red dawn 
had broken over the war-ravaged and blood-weary plains. A com- 
rade who came to relieve him whispered a few words in the darkness, 
and Tom was gone. Xot the same Tom who had taken his place the 
night before, but a youth who had cast off his cloak of indifference 
and dissatisfaction to become a new man, fired with enthusiasm to do 
great things ; one who was glad at last that he was a soldier and eager 
to do his part in the deliverance of the world for democracy and 
right. Peggy had been the one to appeal to the dormant good beneath 



The St. Mary's Muse 



his consciousness, and she had awakened a strong and illuminating 
flame that was going to change a man's outlook upon life and his 
surroundings. 

Two weeks passed before Tom had a chance to do any of the heroic 
deeds that had filled his soul since that memorable night ; but during 
that time his resolve had gradually strengthened into a grim determi- 
nation. Meanwhile the Huns had begun to give more evidence of 
their presence, and every night there were fierce contentions between 
Tom's company and the enemy. 

Bob, the capable captain that he was, was always where the fight 
was fiercest — giving to his men all the encouragement of his own 
vitality, and there was not one in his regiment who would not give 
his life for him. His personality was over all of them, and bound 
them closely to him. They admired and respected him ; indeed, they 
knew from experience that there was nothing he would ask a private 
to do that he would not do himself. He was not afraid of anything, 
and inspired in his men the same courage and determination to win 
through at any cost. 

The time came when it was necessary to send out a scouting party 
far into ISTo Man's Land. Bob left a lower officer in command of the 
trench and with a band of picked men started on his way to find out 
all he could about the position of the enemy and any other informa- 
tion he might be able to gather. Their comrades watched them go 
with a cheery smile and a wish for the "best o' luck," but in their 
hearts they knew that they would never see all of them again. How 
many of them would "go west" they didn't know, nor did they dare 
surmise. 

They waited far into the night before any news came from the 
brave little party, and then suddenly there was great excitement 
everywhere. The Huns had discovered them and were firing rapidly 
in their direction. A staggering, blood-stained youth was seen strug- 
gling toward the trench. When he reached the dugouts he was too 
exhausted to speak, but finally he muttered a few disappointed words : 
"Cap'n Bob — wounded — out there — " A cry rose from every man: 
"I'll bring him in, I'll go after Cap'n Bob" — "He must not die out 
there alone." The commanding officer lifted his hand : "Wait, men. 



The St. Maey's Mtjse 



Listen to me. All of you can't go after liim. but some of you must. 
Think before you offer. Let the men who have least to leave be 
chosen." For a second Tom was motionless. He could see a slim 
and dainty bro'^Ti-haired girl bending over the bier of the brother 
whom she loved more than her life. He knew it would break her 
heart if Bob should not come back, and then — he saw suddenly that 
it was his chance to make atonement for the failure of his past life — 
to give to the girl who had changed his ideals happiness, to do it 
honorably, and to prove to her that if it was necessary he could die a 
Man — one of whom even she would not be ashamed. His face became 
transfixed as he stood there. He was as a man who had seen a Vision 
and was willing to do for it. With a cry of triumph he dashed over 
the parapet, and three others came rushing behind him. 

Before he realized it he was on his way into the grim and terrible 
darkness of those blood-battered fields of hate. The light that came 
from the shrapnel bursting in midair was enough to show him the 
way ; but he had to crawl along slowly at his best, careful not to dis- 
close himself when the angry glow of a bursting shell was making of 
the sky an angrier red. He could hear his comrades now and then 
as they toiled along in the darkness, but he dared not speak ; and so 
silently but none the less determinedly he struggled on as best he 
could. He fell headlong on the ground as a shell burst uncomfortably 
near him. As he went down his hand touched a pocket near his heart 
and felt a letter — even in the darkness he could see it, it seemed to 
him, and a phrase kept ringing through his head, "Don't forget, Tom, 
that I am proud of you, interested in you, and expecting big things 
of you." How long would it be before he could find Bob ? If he 
could save him, then Peggy could be really proud of him — he had to 
save him, that was all. He didn't know much about praying, but 
out there in the darkness he breathed a short and fervent appeal to 
the God of soldier men that he should go through this ordeal bravely, 
and be allowed to finish it as a man would — after that nothing else 
mattered — but he must save Bob. Another shell came whizzing 
through the air, and then he knew nothing. 

How long he had been unconscious he didn't know, but now he was 
keenly aware of several things at once. His head felt like a roaring 



10 The St. Mary's Mijse 

cannon, his sleeve was soaked with blood, and his arm hung limp at 
his side. Thank heaven, it hadn't knocked him out entirely — he 
could get there yet — and painfully he crawled on again. He fell 
over something — the body of a mate^ — "gone west" now — well, he 
hoped he hadn't died in vain; he wouldn't mind so much to die, if 
only he could succeed first in this undertaking. 

It wasn't long before he found Bob, stretched out full length on the 
plain. Was he too late ? He watched him intently for a minute and 
listened closely to his heart beat — ^yes, yes, he was still alive. His 
heart was feeble but there was hope. He dragged him slowly and with 
much pain behind him, dodging bursting shrapnel as best he could. 
He felt weak — but he could not faint now. He thought of Peggy and 
struggled doggedly on. Where were the other boys who had gone out 
as he did to save Bob? Had they all suffered the fate of the poor 
devil he had seen ? Why didn't they come to help him now ? At last 
he saw his own trench — he must reach it with his burden — in a min- 
ute somebody would come to relieve him. I^ow in a minute he would 
have Bob safe. Another shell sounded near him. If he just could 
shield Bob from that one surely he could reach his goal before another 
came. He bent forward as it fell, and Bob was saved once again — 
Yes, Bob was saved, but at what a price! It struck home — Tom 
realized it was his end, but he could die with a smile on his face — 
some one was coming from the trench now, they would take care of 
Bob — nothing else mattered. The comrades who had come to his 
aid reached him in time to hear him feebly utter these few words: 

"Tell — Peggy I — did — my — best — to — make — her — proud of 

me," and so he left them. 

It was several months later that Bob took a transport for home at 
last. He wore a cross of honor on his coat, and to his sister most of 
all he was a hero of the finest type. He had gone through the valley 
of the shadow of death and come out a finer, stronger, braver, truer 
man for the ordeals through which he had passed. For a long time 
he could not bring himself to talk of it, but finally one evening as he 
and Peggy watched the sun sink in flames of soft violet, amber, and 
rose behind the distant hills, and felt the peace and tranquil joy of 
life after finding each other again, Bob pictured to his "little sister" 
softly and beautifully the story as his comrades had told it to him, 



The St. Maey's Muse 11 

of his rescue, of the eternal sacrifice Tom had made for them. After 
the story was ended there was silence — a reverent silence which spoke 
more loudly than any words could what Peggy felt for the man who 
had given his life that she might have her brother back again. With 
a choking sob she put her arms around Bob's neck, and as she kissed 
his bronzed cheek he felt a tear fall from her heavy black lashes, 
which spoke in its pathetic way just how thankful this little girl, who 
had now become a woman, was in the making of Tom a hero ''because 
of the part that Peggy played." 



A Spriog Day 

Maby T. Yellott, '21 

The last pale star fades in the bright'ning sky, 
And heaven is overspread with rosy hue, 

The moon welcomes her lordi with weary sigh, 
And earth is bathed in sparkling silver dew. 

Now from the neighboring wood is clearly heard 

The reveille of many a joyous bird. 

— 'Tis Dawn. 

High in the azure dome of heaven the sun 
Casts o'er the breathless world his burning smile; 

The very zenith of his path is won — 
Idle, without a shadow, rests the dial. 

A moment of tense expectation, then 

The busy world takes up its task again. 

— 'Tis Noon. 

Deep stillness reigns, and in the glowing west, 
All red and golden with reflected light. 

The sun sinks slowly to his peaceful rest. 
And earth is bowed before the coming night. 

Deepens the sky, and now, aloft, afar. 

Majestic hangs a single glorious star. 

—'Tis Dusk. 

Throughout the day, from Dawn till Twilight fell, 
'Twas in the air — a something strange and new — 

Vague murmurs and faint whisperings that tell 
Of sunny days and skies forever blue. 

Rejoice! the birds have caroled it all day, 

Earth, heaven, sun, moon, and all things living say, 

" 'Tis Spring!" 



12 The St. Mary's Muse 



TalK Happiness 

Eleanor Sublett, '20 

There is a well known old saying, "If you want to be happy your- 
self, make others happy; if you want to make others happy, be first 
happy yourself." And the easiest way to be happy is to talk happi- 
ness. How much these two words could mean if we would all think 
seriously of their real meaning and truth and try to act on them 
every day ! 

But to talk happiness is not so easy as it sounds, for oftentimes 
things go so wrong that it is much easier to show our unhappiness, if 
just a little, and gain sympathy, rather than to push back our troubles 
and think of making the others happy. 

There is happiness everywhere if we just take time and thought to 
look for it. It is impossible not to realize that the age in which we 
are living is a very serious one. We each feel that we want to do 
something big, something that will count in this great world war. 
But we cannot all do the spectacular things, so it is for us who cannot 
to do the little things, to make the little world about us in everyday 
life brighter and happier because we are in it. Xow, more than ever, 
there is need to look for happiness, and finding it, as we are sure to do, 
to talk it. To talk happiness to those about us will rest many a tired 
ear. It seems a little thing, but in the end the little things added 
together are what count. 

Let us remember that, though we cannot fight in the front-line 
trenches, and cannot do the big things which seem to count so much, 
we can do one thing which will mean a great deal to those about us as 
v/ell as to ourselves : look for happiness everywhere, for it is there to 
be found. Remember, others need to be cheered, and by talking hap- 
piness always we will make each and every person we meet just a 
little happier. This is surely worth while, and something which will 
count in the home life of this great war. 



The St. Maey's Muse 13 



IN LIGHTER VEIN 



Ti)z War Gardeners 

Gently, oh, tenderly, handle with care! 

Loosen the earth with your hoe; 
Pat it down softly, yet firmly, see there; 

Moisten it just a bit — so; 
Now stand aside, give it plenty of air, 

And the dear little onion will grow. 



In Quarantine 

Oh, we're the jolly Quarantines — 

A carefree bunch are we — 
We laugh and sing the whole day long, 

As you can plainly see. 

'Tis fun to be a Quarantine 
V/hen all the world is bright; 

But it's lucky you can't see us 
At ten o'clock at night! 



(Tb« Wages of Disorder is — Poetry) 

I saw a weeping maiden — 

'Twas not so long ago — 
I asked her what the matter was; 

She answered soft and low, 
"The soulful poetry of Keats 

Always affects me so." 



Rejoice, ye glad St. Mary's girls — 

Light both of heart and purse — 
The last Pay Day has come and gone. 

And with it went the worse; 
And if the worst is yet to come, 

'Tis right here in this verse! 

M. T.Y.. '20. 



14 The St. Mary's Muse 



When Kitty Had a Cold 

Virginia Ploka 

A-chew! Kitty sneezed so hard that she dropped the powder-box 
on the floor. Oh, goodness ! along with everything else she was 
catching cold. jSTothing went right : her hair would not comb, her 
hoop would not stand out right, her dress was a mess, and everything 
was all wrong. She was just sprinkling the last touches of powder 
on her hair when she heard the "Honk-honk" outside. Of course 
Sidney always did things like that. Il^ow Jack would not have 
honked for her ; he would have come in and waited ; but Jack — Oh, 
well, she did not intend to think of him at all. She picked up her 
coat and ran down the steps, kissed her mother, ran out the door, and 
got into the waiting car. 

''Oh, Sidney, you are the funniest looking thing I ever saw !" 

"Well, I feel like an idiot all right." He was dressed in a George 
Washington costume with short pants, ruffles on his wrists, and a 
powdered wig. She was dressed like Martha Washington, with hoop 
skirt and her hair piled up high on her head and powdered. They 
were on their way to Peggy Stewart's colonial ball. On the way they 
passed Jack with Margaret Mitchell. 

"It is so odd that he has started rushing her all of a sudden, isn't 
it ? I used to think that you all had a case up. What happened ?" 
said Sidney, as they passed, for Kitty's head was turned the other 
way. Why did Jack persist in rushing that horrid girl ? She did 
not reply to Sidney's remark. 

They were nearly the first to arrive. Another thing to irritate her. 
A-chew ! A shower of powder came down this time. 

"Kitty, you are getting a cold," came in a chorus from the girls in 
the dressing room. Yes, she was getting a cold and she knew it. 
Why did everyone persist in telling her ? What was the matter with 
her, anyway ? She felt as if she wanted to cry and cry. 

"Jack is adorable, don't you think so, Kitty?" Margaret Mitchell 
asked as she entered the dressing room. 

"A-chew! What did you say, Margaret ?" But Kitty was out of 



The St. Mary's Muse 15 

the door and nearly down the stairs by then. Sidney met her and so 
saved her from running into Jack. 

It was near the end of the dance. They had danced the minuet 
and were nearing the last dance when Jack broke on Kitty. "Oh, 
goodness, what is going to happen ?" thought Kitty. A-chew ! 

"Come on, let's sit it out," said Jack, leading Kitty to the den. 
She was so tired she did not really care where she went or what she 
did. 

"Kitty, please let's be sensible and make up. I am just as sorry 
as I can be. Aren't you ?" 

A-chew ! But not a word did she say. 

Jack sat and looked at her for about five minutes. How pretty 
she was! Why didn't she say something? 

"Why did you rush that awful girl, J-a-c-k?" This came from 
Kitty in a half sobbing voice. 

"Oh, Kitty, you are adorable!" He put her head on his shoulder 
and she let it stay there. He started to kiss her, but she stopped him. 

"Oh, you will get germs. Jack. I have an awful cold — a-chew !" 

Nevertheless — 



16 The St. Maey's Muse 



SCHOOL NEWS 



The Honor Roll for February 

The Honor Roll for the fifth school month, February, was again 

led by Henrietta Morgan of the Senior Class, who has made a splendid 

average during her three years at St. Mary's. 

Av. Hrs. 

1. Henrietta Morgan, '18 96.0 (17) 

2. Helen Cooper, '21 93.5 (12) 

3. Katherine Alston, '21 93.0 (21) 

4. Bessie Folk, '18 93.0 (13) 

5. Aline Hughes, '18 92.8 (16) 

6. Elizabeth Kitchin, '19 92.1 (17) 

7. Elizabeth Baker, '22 92.0 (15) 

8. Mary Yellott, '21 91.4 (21) 

9. Nina Cooper, '21 91.0 (20) 

10. Katherine Drane, '18 90.4 (20) 

11. Mary Strange Morgan, '23 90.6 (15) 

12. Mary Hoke, '20 90.2 (20) 

13. Jane Toy, '21 90.1 (22) 

February 23d : Hon, Theodore Marburg-, Former Minister to Belgium, 
Speaks in the Auditorium 

On Saturday night, February 23d, Hon. Theodore Marburg spoke 
on "Aims of the War" in the St. Mary's Auditorium. Mr. Marburg 
was United States Minister to Belgium under the last Republican 
Administration. 

Mr. Marburg began his address with a few appealing sketches of 
the life and spirit of the men at the front. One of these was of a 
Christmas Eve dinner in 1916 at the Foreign Office, where some 
young ofiicers were gathered that night. He told how in the general 
discussions of the evening a Christmas tree was mentioned, at which 
a bright idea seized one of the men. In the middle of the table stood 
a little palm tied with a string, to which some one attached a notice, 
"Do not cut the string, or the palm will turn into an artichoke" — 
this would make a Christmas tree. Immediately gifts began to come 
forth to adorn it. Bits of string, a broken knife, a card, an empty 



The St. Maey's Muse 17 

matcli-box labeled "A matchless present," a stopper from a decanter 
labeled "A corking present," and so on. Then a jumping-jack was 
hit upon as being an absolute necessity for a complete Christmas tree, 
and one was produced, being made of a chunk of bread with knives 
and forks for arms and legs. This was set in a conspicuous place to 
the joy of the crowd. Such little bits of their humor give an idea 
of the spirit of the men who are fighting for us, an example to us not 
to go around with a long face after our work is done, but to work hard 
and be cheerful as well as courageous. 

Mr. Marburg next stated the duty of the United States at the 
present time, that of sending men, ammunition and food for them, 
and ammunition and food for our allies. Germany cannot win this 
war, for wrong itself cannot and never has, in history, come out vic- 
torious, and "Xo man in the whole of history has made such a mis- 
take as the German Kaiser." 

Then followed a brief resimie of the development of Germany's 
prosperity through conquests, and the final throwing aside of all that 
had been gained in art, science, music, and all the branches of that 
higher intellectual culture, "owing to the lack of gray matter of one 
man," the Kaiser, and his lust for material wealth and political 
power. It must be proven to Germany that in the present age gains 
such as Belgium, which she invaded, confessing it a wrong all the 
while, Poland, etc.. cannot pay. Germany must be beaten, not for 
revenge, but to eliminate for always the idea that might makes right. 

With regard to a future Leagiie of the Xations, Mr. Marburg spoke 
at length, outlining the present plan for such a union. A union it 
must be which need not necessarily aim to enforce peace, but which 
would take away the license of making war at will, offering a plan for 
conciliation, for time to consider, "a cooling-off period." 

In conclusion, Mr. Marburg gave some accounts of personal inter- 
views with several interesting personages, including King Albert and 
the Queen of Belgium, and Sir Edward Grey of England. These 
were intensely interesting and added much to our impressions of them 
made through the news world. 

It is hoped that St. Mary's will again have the pleasure of a visit 
and address from Mr. Marburg. 



18 



The St. Maey's Muse 



February 25th: The Indoor Meet 

The annual indoor meet was held in the Gymnasium Monday 
afternoon, February 25th. Almost the entire School was present, 
with all the enthusiasm the Gym' could hold, and every participant 
was made to feel justly proud of her work in the meet. The showing, 
on the whole, was excellent from both sides, a number of girls making 
very high percentages out of the possible 60 points. At the end of 
the program the score was a tie and had to be settled by a relay race. 
This was also very close, but the final victory went to the Sigmas. 

The scores for the different events were as follows, each event 
counting 10 points to the side winning the highest number of points : 

Individual Scores 

Events Sigma Mu Sigma Mu 

Ropes 85 82 10 

Traveling boom 181 177 10 

Marching ... 10 

Buck 176 174 10 

Box 211 215 10 

Front leaning rest 179 184 10 

Boom vault 113 111 10 

Bowling race ... 10 

Relay race ... 10 



Highest Individual Scores: 

Battle, 60 out of 60 

Hoke, 59 out of 60 

Ball, Batts, Barber, 58 out of 60. 



Total score 68 



40 



Those who made over 50 out of the possible 60 points : 



Sigm.a 

Battle 60 

Hoke 59 

Batts 68 

Mullins 57 

Royster 54 

Hawkins, M 54 



Mu 

Barber 58 

Dall 58 

Yellott 56 

Barwis 55 



The St. Maey's Muse 19 

March 6th: Mrs. Mand Ballington Booth, at the City Auditorium 

On Wednesday night, March 6th, a large proportion of the School 
attended the last session of the Xorth Carolina Social Service Con- 
ference in the City Auditorium. There were several songs, ''Amer- 
ica," "Dixie," and "The Star Spangled Banner," simg by the whole 
audience, conducted by Mr. E. Blinn Owen with his usual enthusiasm 
and good leadership. There w^ere several other musical numbers 
on the program, and, after a talk by Dr. D. H. Hill, the speaker of 
the evening, Mrs. Maud Ballington Booth, was introduced. 

Of course everyone has heard of Mrs. Booth's great work in prison 
reform, and it w^as a gTcat privilege to hear her tell of her personal 
experiences, of her great love and interest in her "boys," and of the 
many times their "little mother" had been able to help them. Mrs. 
Booth is a wonderfully magnetic speaker and held the interest of her 
audience to the very last, inspiring them with her zeal "to do some- 
thing for somebody," to help some of the other "Johnnies" of the 
world to respect and help themselves. 

March 8th: First Tolley-ball Game 

The volley-ball season was ushered in wath an exciting game Satur- 
day night, March 8th. This first game, a good indicator of the spirit 
of the School with regard to this branch of athletics this year, was 
characterized by quickness, skill, and an unusual degTee of enthusi- 
astic interest. The final whistle closed the game with a score of 30 to 
17 in favor of the Mus. 

The line-up was as follows : 

Mus Sig^nas 

Barber Battle (Capt.) 

Burke Waddell 

Lay, E. Hoke 

Lay, N. Royster 

Hill, R. Yorke 

Powell (Capt.) Cooper, N. 

Browne, E. Collier 



20 The St. Mary's Muse 

March 10th: Miss Mills, Assistant Student Secretary of the Board of Missions, 
Addresses the Students on Visit to the School 

Miss Dorothy Mills, Assistant Student Secretary of the Board of 
Missions, was the guest of the School at the Rectory for several days 
while on her way to Elon College to the Student Volunteer Con- 
ference. St. Mary's sent two representatives to this conference, 
Susan Smith and Katharine Drane, elected by the Auxiliary Council, 
who accompanied Miss Mills from Raleigh. The conference at Elon 
proved delightful and inspiring, and an account of it will be given 
later in The Muse. 

On her return to St. Mary's Miss Mills gave a stirring talk on the 
missionary work and opportunity for missionary work in China. 
She has just come from China, and it seemed as if that country was 
sending a message, a call, to us through her. She acted as a v>^indow, 
as it were, through which we could get a peep into China — a China 
with one eye wide awake and fast opening the other one also. Here 
is old China, with her bound feet, superstitions, ignorance, and hea- 
thenism, full of fear and misery, 3'et plodding year in, year out, in the 
same old way because it was all "good enough for their fathers, and 
so is good enough for them." But out of this old China there rises 
a new China, progressive, awake, and Christian, full of hope and 
happiness, demanding teachers, doctors, and ministers faster than 
they can be supplied. xVnd shall we ignore this call for help ? 

Miss Mills interested the girls so deeply that after her talk thirty 
or more gathered around her in the Parlor while she gave further 
facts and details of Chinese life and customs. 

It was indeed a very great pleasure to have Miss Mills at the 
School, and she will always find a warm welcome at St. Mary's. 

March 16th: "Scenes from the Life of a Bible Woman" 

On Saturday night, March 16th, St. Monica's and St. Catharine's 
Auxiliary Chapters united in giving a play, "Scenes From the Life 
of a Bible Woman," under the direction of Susan Smith and Helen 
Battle, the authors of the production. The scene was laid in Wu- 
chang, China, and was the story of the work and influence of a 
Chinese Bible Woman against the superstitions of her own people. 
She brings sick children, tortured with red-hot needles by the native 



The St. Mary's Muse 21 

doctors, to the white doctors, who heal their bodies. Aiid she tells 
them of Christ who heals their souls. The atmosphere of Chinese 
life was maintained throughout and the characters were well chosen. 
Ella Pender as the Bible Woman, Mary Mullins as Shasi the sick 
girl, Polly Freeman as Deaconess Hart, and Louise Bacon as Shasi's 
mother were especially good. 

The entire performance, with the underlying idea of the play 
itself, a decidedly new and interesting one, and the way in which it 
was carried out, was a great credit to both the authors and all those 
concerned in it. The originality of the whole was decidedly ap- 
pealing. 

Faculty Notes 

St. Mary's is always interested in the work of the Woman's Club 
of Raleigh, and we are especially interested this year, as Mrs, Lay is 
the president of the club. Also, during the winter both Mr. Stone 
and Dr, Lay have given lectures in different departments of the club. 
In December Mr. Stone lectured in the Art Department on "The 
Historical Development of Art in the Ancient World." During Feb- 
ruary Dr, Lay lectured in the Literary Department on the "Sophocles 
Trilogy," Miss Hester and the Seniors attended Dr, Lay's lecture, 
which proved both interesting and enjoyable, 

A number of the faculty have been greatly interested in the Uni- 
versity Extension Course lectures, given by Dr, Greenlaw, Dr. Pier- 
son, and Dr. Henderson of the University of iSTorth Carolina. The 
subject of the course this year dealt with different phases of Russian 
history, and have been intensely interesting to those who attended 
the lectures. Miss Myrick, Miss Frances Bottum, Miss Agnes Bar- 
ton, and Mile. Rudnicka were among those from the School who 
have enjoyed the course. 

The Local Exemption Board of Raleigh, calling for volunteer 
workers from the teachers of the schools of the city, found St. Mary's 
ready to help. Mr. Cruiksliank volunteered to direct the special 
work to be done by the volunteers, and Miss Frances Bottum, Miss 
Agnes Barton, and Miss Margaret Bottum have been faithful aids in 
the work. It is only a "bit," but has seen a successful conclusion 
under Mr. Cruikshank's able direction and the willing assistance he 
has gotten from the teachers of the city schools. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Subscription Price - One Dollar 

Single Copies Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published montlily except in July and August at St. Mary's 
School, Raleigh, N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnse, under the 
editorial management of the Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 

. EDITORIAL STAFF, 1917-1918 

AiJNE E. Hughes, '18, Editor-in-CMef 

senior reporters 
Kathaeine p. Dbane, '18 Elizabeth MoM. Folk, '18 

junior reporters 
Helen Van W. Battle, '20 Ellen Lay, '19 

Mildred Kebtland, '20 Alice Seed, '20 

Agnes T. Pkatt Business Manager 

Mary C. Wilson, '20, 

Louise Toleb. '19, Assistant Business Managers 



EDITORIAL 



Lent is usually a time of good hard, work, and this year it has been 
more truly so than ever, for besides our regular work we have been 
sewing and knitting for the Red Cross, studying surgical dressings, 
and working in the garden. When Easter comes and all the world 
seems to be waking up all fresh and beautiful, we are apt to feel, too, 
that we have been loosed from some heavy weight, and that we must 
immediately show our relief and happiness in some big way. Do not 
let all this energy run wild, girls. Hoe a row in the garden and 
afterwards you will feel you have had just as good a time, and you 
will also feel that you have really "done something." 



The St. Maey's Muse 23 

After Easter, you know, too, comes the ''home stretch" to com- 
mencement. Those of us who have been working hard must keep it 
up, and do just a little bit more anyhow, and if we've been lagging 
behind, let's take a good breath and keep on with all our energy to 
the finish. We seem to find things worth doing, so let us do as well 
as we possibly can. 



Hon)e AgaiQ 

These days if you meet anyone with a countenance just beaming 
for all the world, you know without a second thought what is behind 
that smile. She has been home for a spring vacation week-end, or is 
about to enjoy that pleasure. There is nothing to replace the intense 
joy of that hard-earned week-end at home in the spring. It does the 
individual good, it does the general atmosphere around us good to be 
filled with the happiness that radiates from those trips. Before 
going you work with intense energy, smiling all the while with the 
anticipation of the pleasure to come ; on returning you are still smil- 
ing, with the memories of all the good times a stimulus to work 
harder than ever. Perhaps it is the brevity of these little vacations 
that makes the joy the keener, but they bring back to the School a 
lot of sunshine. And also a lot of renewed energ}^ to spur up the 
final months of school work. 



Communioations and Correspondence Solicited. 

Ernest Cbuikshank, Alumnae Editor 



St. Mary's Alumnsg Association. 

HoNORAHr President - - Mra. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

Honorary Vice-Presidents - / ^'^- ^- ^^K. Pittinger. Raleigh. 

^ Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham. 

President _ _ _ _ Mrs. John H. Holmes, Chapel Hill. 

Vice-President _ _ _ Mrs. Walter Grimes, Raleigh. 
Secretary - _ _ _ Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer _ _ _ _ Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 



f!lun)nae Notes 

Following up the visit of tlie President of the Alumnce Association, 
Mrs. John S. Holmes of Chapel Hill, to a large part of the Ahimnse 
Chapters last fall, the Alumnte Council is now planning for the 
Alumnse Luncheon, which it is hoped to make one of the features of 
Commencement. It will be given on Monday of Commencement 
Week, June 4th, and the details wull doubtless have been arranged by 
the time of the publication of the next Muse. 

It is planned to observe Alumnge Day, May 12th, at the School this 
year on Ascension Day, which is the preceding Thursday, May 9th. 
The Kaleigh alumnse will be invited, as usual, to be the guests of the 
School at luncheon on that day, and following the luncheon Miss 
Mabel Barton, the Director of Physical Training, will present a pro- 
gram of her pupils in aesthetic dancing and drills. 

Pollowing the example of the Class of 1904, who last year turned 
over their class fund to the Endowment Fund, the Class of 1915 is 
now preparing to invest its class fund in a Liberty Loan Bond and 
present it to the School for the Endowment Fund. 



With tbe Class of 1905 

"Margaret DuBose" (Mrs. Isaac T. Avery of Morganton, N. C.) 
writes the following very interesting letter : 

"I have our Class Letter with me now, which was started in February, 1915, 
and I thought j'ou might he interested in an item or two from each girl. I 



The St. Maky's Muse 



started it and it went to Anna Clark Gordon (Mrs. Wm. J. Gordon of Spray, 
N. C), who writes about the interesting work at Spray and her young daugh- 
ter, Anna Barrow. (I knew her husband when he was a Sewanee boy — he 
was so wise.) Then Rena Clark (Tarboro, N. C), who was much interested 
in playing golf — generally with Annie Gray Nash. TTien to Ida Evans (War- 
renton, Va.), who speaks of visiting Mamie Rossell. seeing Jean Carson and 
Heloise Beebe. She is in charge of the Warrenton Library. Effie Fairley 
(Mrs. N. C. English, Monroe, N. C.) tells of her two daughters and the S.M.S. 
girls she met at Ret Ruff's wedding. Ellen Gibson's (Mrs. Don MacRae, Con- 
cord, N. C.) letter was one long "remenis" of Far Countree — and telling about 
the movie scenarios she wrote and saw played in Concord, and of her kinder- 
garten. Porie Grant (Wilmington, N. C.) has been teaching in the Wilmington 
Public Schools — the sixth-grade boys. Dorothy Hughson Goodell (Mrs. Philip 
Goodell, Montclair, N. J.) writes of the two babies (she has three now) and her 
visit to Morganton and Asheville. Sadie Jenkins Battle's (Mrs. G. C. Battle, 
Asheville. N C.) letter is about her lovely home in Asheville and the S.M.S. 
girls she has seen. Bessie Poe Law (Mrs. Paul E. Davis, Wilsons Mills, N. C.) 
hadn't seen a member of the class in the whole eleven years! She has a small 
son six years old and strongly advises matrimony. Mossie Long (Rocking- 
ham, N. C.) writes of her trips and poultry business, and Mamie Rossell 
(Staten Island, N. Y.) has been to the Library School run in connection with 
the New York Public Schools, and is now a full-fledged Children's Librarian 
(doesn't that sound fascinating!). Linda Tillinghast married her cousin 
Angelo, so she is still a Tillinghast. He is in training at Fort Dade, near 
Tampa, Fla., but she is in Spartanburg, S. C. 

"The letters themselves are certainly interesting. ... Do remember me 
to all the St. Mary's friends." 

Mrs. iVvery modestly omits any mention of her o^^^l very interest- 
ing family of five, who form one of the very distinct assets of the class. 



Alumnae Personals 

Letters from the girls of last year's class, now well on toward the 
end of their first year of teaching, give very enconraging reports of 
their experiences and snccess. Virginia C. Allen at Hickory, Alice 
Latham at Hendersonville, Emma Badham at Edenton, and Enbie 
Thorne at Heming"way, S. C, are evidently all doing well. 

St. Mary's girls are, of course, well represented among the women 
who have gone to Washington to place their services at the disposal of 
the Government. Frances Strong, '...., Rebecca Merritt, '...., and 
Louise Merritt, '...., are three who have gone from Raleigh alone, and 
thev find the work no sinecure. 



26 The St. Mart's Mtjse 

Dorotliy Valentine Brown ('lO-'ll) of ISTew York City, a graduate 
of the Training School for l^urses of St. Luke's Hospital, New York, 
sailed in January with a hospital unit for active work in France. 
Elise Gordon Stiles ('11-'13), who is in her last year of training at 
St. Luke's, is now recovering from a severe illness, which necessitated 
a serious operation. She is convalescing at the home of her relatives 
in ISTew York, and hopes to return to the hospital to graduate with 
her class in April, completing her period of training after graduation. 

Esther Barnwell Means, '04, who has for several years been en- 
gaged in Social Settlement Work, during the last year in Philadel- 
phia, sailed in February for France to take up Y. W. C. A. work 
there. 

Grace Crews, '14, who gTaduated last spring from the Children's 
Hospital, Washington, D. C, has just entered upon her duties as 
Superintendent of ISTurses at Watts Hospital, Durham, 'N. C. Miss 
Lillian Fenner is Dietitian at this hospital. 

Miss Eleanor Walter Thomas has completed her work for the 
Master of Arts degree at Columbia University and received the de- 
gree. She is now teaching temporarily in one of the New York City 
high schools, but has not definitely decided upon her plans for next 
year. 

Alumnae Weddings 

Kelly- Adams: On Saturday, February 23, at Gary, N. C, Mabel Jamie Adams 
(S.M.S. 1917-18) and Samuel Graham Kelly. At home Petersburg, Va. 

Steonach-McAden: On Saturday, March 2, at Raleigh, N. C, Mrs. Bennie 
McAden Potter (S.M.S. 1905-06) and Mr. John Bardton Stronach. 

Biggers-Maxwell : On Tuesday, March 5, at Christ Church, Pensacola, Pla., 
Evelyn Cameron Maxwell (S.M.S. '13) and Ensign Robert Lowery Big- 
gers, U. S. N. R. F. C. 

Pkice-Herbert : On Saturday, March 9, at Christ Church, Greenville, S. C, 
Leone Sidney Herbert (S.M.S. 1911-12) and Capt. E. C. Price. At home 
Greenville, S. C. 

Gatling-Mardre: On Wednesday, April 3, at St. Thomas' Church, Windsor, 
N. C, Clara Urie Mardre (S.M.S. 1915-17) and Mr. John Morris Gatling. 

Satjls-Roberts : On Saturday, April 6, at Savannah, Ga., LrOis Mershon Rob- 
erts (S.M.S. 1914-15) and George Elton Sauls. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Patronize those who patronize you. Remember that it is 
the advertisers who make the publication of the Muse 
possible. 



DON'T FORGET 

TAYLOR'S 

206-10 MASONIC TEMPLE 



KING-CROWELUS DRUG STORE 

and SODA FOUNTAIN 

CORNER FAYETTEVILLE and HARGETT STREETS 



Success in the Campaign for the Raising of the $250,000 
Fund to pay off the debt and provide additional new build- 
ings, and the beginning of an Endowment Fund is of the 
utmost importance to St. Mary's. 

Think of it, talk of it, and help in every way you can. 



B. W. JONES 

The 
Best in 
Groceries 

Phones 667-668 528 Hillsboro Street 



'You get them when promised" 



Hortoh s Studio 

Masonic Temple 



'Workers in Artistic Photography' 



Adveetisements 



SL Mary*s Girls Always Welcome at 

Hudson-Belk Company 

Full line of Ready-to-wear, Hosiery, Gloves, Furnishings, Dry 
Goods, Shoes, Toilet Goods, Ribbons and Laces \ 



ESTABLISHED 1858 

H. MAHLER'S SONS 


BOYLAN-PEARGE 

COMPANY 


JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 


The Greatest Store 
in the City for the 

SCHOOL GIRLS 


M. ROSENTHAL & COMPANY 

GROCERS 

Wilmington and Hargett Streets 


SEE 

HERBERT ROSENTHAL 

FOR REAL SHOES 



ONLY A LITTLE, HOWEVER 

Mary had a little lamb — 
We'll tell you in a trice — 

You see it was not meatless day. 
And Mary had the price. 

— Selected. 



Why Is 

Brantley's Fountain 

the 

MOST POPULAR? 

Ask the Girls 



VISITING GARDS 

CORRECTLY anil PROMPTLY ENGRAVED 

Send for samples and prices 

Edwards & Broughton Printing 
Company 

Steel Die and Copper Plate Engravers 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements 



HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
THE WAKE DRUG STORE 

Phones 228 



HICKS' UPTOWN DRUG STORE 

Phone 107 
PROMPT DELIVERY 



Thomas H. Briggs & Sons 

The Big Hardware Men Raleigh, N. C. 



Base Balls, Basket Balls 
Tennis and Sporting Goods 



Raleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets. 



PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 

12 W. Hargett St. 



RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 



Call OLIVE'S BAGGAGE TRANSFER 

Phone 529 

DARNELL & THOMAS 

ONE-PRICE MUSIC HOUSE 

T. F. BROCKWELL 

AU Kinds of Keys. Bicycle Supplies. 

Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired. 



A goat ate up all our jokes, 
And then began to run; 

"I cannot stop," he softly said, 
"I am so full of fun!" 

— Selected. 



Stationery, College Linen, Pennants, 
Cameras and Supplies 
"Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 

JAMES E.THIEM 

BeU Phone 135 RALEIGH, N. 0. 

CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE 

FINE CANDIES PURE ICE CREAM 
FRUIT 

We carry the most complete line of Fruit an d 
Candies in town. 
Ill FAYBTTEVILLE STREET 



JOHNSON & JOHNSON CO. 

Coal, Wood, Ice, Brick 
122 Fayettcville Street Raleigh, N. C. 

H. STEINMETZ— FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 
Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



Phone 113 



CAROLINA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light and 

Power and Gas 

1376— BOTH PHONES— 1377 



WALK-OVER— The Shoe for You 
Walk-Orer Shoe Shop 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

S. GLASS The Ladies' Store 

Everj-thing up-to-date for Ladies, Misses 

and Children. Ready-made wearing apparel 

210 Fayettevil!e St. Raleigh, N. 0. 

Wm. Heller 

THE FOOTERY SHOP 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Adveetisements 



THE FASHION 

KAPLAN BROS. CO. 
The college girls' store for Snappy, Classy, 
Youthful Garments and Millinery. 



TEN PER CENT DISCOUNT TO COLLEGE 
STUDENTS AND TEACHERS 



ORDER YOUR CUT FLOWERS 

FROM 

J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Phone 149 



w e r^f^ s& 




Exclusive 
nillinery 



RALCIGH M.C 



WHITE ICE CREAM CO. 

BEST 
ICE CREAM 

Phone 123 

WILMINGTON STREET 



Their meeting it was sudden, 

Their meeting it was sad; 
She gave away her bright young life — 

The only one she had. 
And there beneath the willows 

Is where she's lying now: 
For there's always something doing 

When a freight train meets a cow! 

— Selected. 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company Home Capital 


Insure Against Loss by Fire 

Best Compauies Represented. Bonding Solicited 

Charles E. Johnson, Jr. 

RALEIGH, N. 0. 


OHAS. E. JOHNSON, President 

A. A. THOMPSON, Treasurer 

B. S. BUSBEE, Secretary 

WATSON PICTURE AND ART CO. 

Picture Frames and Window Shades. 


HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
SHOES AND HOSIERY 


C. D. ARTHUR City Market 
FISH AND OYSTERS 


SHOES! WHOSE? 
BERNARD L. CROCKER 

124 Fayetteville Street 


ELLINGTON'S ART STORE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Collegre Pennants, Pillows, Pictures, 
Frames, Novelties 


GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 
Fire Insurance 


EOYSTER'S CANDY A SPECIALTY 

Made Fresh Every Day 



Advektisements 



THE YARBOROUGH 



Raleigh's Leading and Largest Hotel 
Dioners and Banquets a Specialty B. H. Griffin Hotel Co., Proprietors 



Jolly & Wynne Jewelry Cq. 

COLLEGE 
JEWELRY 

128 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 



YOUNG & HUGHES 



Plumbers 

Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating 



S. Wilmington Street 



THE LESSONS OP THE WAR 

"So you are saving up to buy an airship? You are quite an ambitious little 
boy." 

"Yes, sir; I wants to fly over Jimmie Mack's backyard and drop bricks on 
him." — Selected. 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



Premier Carrier of the South 



Most Direct Line to all Points North, South, 
East, West 



Through sleeping cars to all principal cities, through Tourist Cars 
to San Francisco and other California points. All-year tourist tick- 
ets on sale to principal Western points. Convenient local, as well 
as through trains. Electrically lighted coaches. Complete Dining 
Car Service on all through trains. Ask representatives of Southern 
Railway about special rates account Christmas holidays; also 
about various other special occasions. If you are contemplating a 
trip to any point, communicate with representatives of Southern 
Railway before completing your arrangements for same. They will 
gladly and courteously furnish you with all information as to the 
cheapest and most comfortable way in which to make the trip. Will 
also be glad to secure Pullman Sleeping Car reservations for you 



H. F. CARY, General Pass. Agent, 
Washington, D. C. 



J. 0. JONES, Traveling Pass. Agent, 
Raleigh, N, C, 



Adveetisements 



l^afapette 



A Cafe •which invites the patronaere of ladies. The girls of St. Mary's ■wrill enjoy 
the beauty and convenience of onr modern, well-appointed dining: place. 

Fayetteville Street, next to Almo. 



See us for PORCH FURNITURE 
Royall & Borden Furniture Co. 

FAYETTEVILLE, STREET 



Patronize 

STAUDT'S BAKERY 

Hillsboro Street, Near St. Mary's 

School 



"I don't like your heart action," the doctor saldf, applying the stethoscope 
again. "You have had some trouble with angina pectoris." 

"You are mighty right, doctor," said the young man, sheepishly, "only that 
ain't her name." — Selected. 



Teacher: "What is lyrical poetry?" 

Pupil: "Poetry originally sung by a liar." — Selected. 



PERRY'S ART STORE 

S. Wilmington St. 


WORK CALLED FOR AND DELIVERED 
BELL PHONE 503 
SHD-FIXERY 


MOORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 
104 EAST HARGETT ST. Bell Phone 719 


J. R. KEE. Manager 103 FayetteTille St. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 

Shoes repaired while you wait. 

Come to see our modern plant. 


MISSES REESE & COMPANY 
MILLINERY 


L. SCHWARTZ 
RICHMOND MARKET 

Meats of All Kinds 


BATES-ARRINGTON & COMPANY 
PURE FOOD GROCERIES 



ROUTE OF THK "NIGHT EXPRESS' 



aiiroad 



Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

DIRECT LINE BETWEEN 



RFOLK 



RALEIGH 

NEW BERN 

GOLDSBORO 



Via WASHINGTON, KINSTON, GREENVILLE, FARMVILLE 
AND ■Wn^SON, TO POINTS NORTH AND SOUTH 

Electric Lighted Pullman Sleeping and Parlor Cars 



Fast Schedule, Best Service 



Double Daily Express Service 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 



Climate Healthy and Salvhrious, 



St. Mary^s School 



RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women) 



NOW IN 76tli Ai^-mrAL SESSIOlSr 



session dttided into two teems. 

Easteb Teem began Januaby 21st, 1918. 



1. THE COLLEGE 

2. THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT 
St. Mary's \ ^ ^.^^ ^^rj^ DEPARTMENT 

offers 
instruction { Jf. THE ELOCUTION DEPARTMENT 

in these ) 5^ jr^j^ HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT 
Departments / 

6. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL 

7. THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 



In 1917-18 are enrolled 250 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty. 



Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New, 

Thirtj/-six Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and 

Dormitories. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Eduoation loitTiout 

slight to the Scholastic training. 

For catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, D. C. L., 
Rector. 

■BWANO* • BROUCHTON PRINTIHO CO.. •ALIISH. M. C 







2lpril=i«aj», 1918 



ST. MARY'S CALENDAR, 1917-18 

APRIL-MAY. 



Saturday, 

Monday, 

Saturday, 

Monday, 
Saturday, 

Monday, 

Thursday, 



Saturday, 

Sunday, 

Monday, 

Saturday, 

Monday, 

Saturday, 



Saturday, 

Sunday, 

Monday, 



April 20: 
April 22: 
April 27: 

April 29: 
May 4: 

May 6: 

May 9: 



May 11 

May 12 

May 13 

May 18 

May 20 

May 25 

May 27-29 

May 28-30 
June 1-4 : 
June 1 : 

June 2 : 

June 3 : 



Tuesday, June 4: 



8:00 p.m. St. Elizabetli's Chapter. 

8:30 p. m. Faculty Recital. 

8:30 p. m. University of North Carolina Dramatic 

Club. 
8:15 p.m. Certificate Recital. Miss Mary Neal, Voice. 
8:15 p.m. Inter-Society Debate. Epsilon Alpha Pi 

vs. Sigma Lambda. 
8:15 p.m. Certificate Recital. Miss Dorothy Wood, 

Piano. 
Ascension Day. Holy Day. 
11:00 a. m. Holy Communion, with Sermon. 
Exercises Commemorative of Alumnae Day. 
1 : 15 p. m. Alumnae Luncheon. 
2 : 45 p. m. Meeting of the Raleigh Chapter. 
3:30 p m. Festival Program. 
Juniors entertain Seniors. 
Alumnee Day. 76th Birthday of St. Mary's. 
Certificate Recital. Miss Alice Seed, Elocution. 
Annual "School Party." 

Certificate Recital. Miss Helen Cooper, Piano. 
Annual Recital of the Chorus. 
Senior Examinations. 
Final Examinations. 
Commencement Peogkam. 

8:30 p. m. Annual Recital of the Elocution Depart- 
ment. Tennyson's "The Princess." 
11:00 a.m. Annual Sermon. Rev. W. W. Memmin- 

ger, D. D., Atlanta, Ga. 
11:00 a.m. Class Day Exercises. 
3:30 p. m. Annual Alumnae Meeting. 
8 : 30 p. m. Annual Concert. 

10:30 a.m. Graduating Exercises. Address by Rev. 
i W. H. Milton, D.D., Wilmington, N. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse 

SPRING NUMBER 
Vol. XXII Apeil-May, 1918 No. 8 



St. Mary's ar)d the Third Liberty Loan 

It will be remembered that in October the St. Mary's students 
pledged and gave $250 in Liberty Bonds to the St. Mary's Endow- 
ment Fund. 

N^ow follows the campaign throughout the country to raise three 
billion dollars as the Third Liberty Loan since the United States 
entered the war. And the St. Mary's girls, in the same way they have 
met every call, have pledged and raised more than $100 for bonds in 
this third loan. These bonds they will also make a gift to the St. 
Mary's Endowment Fund. 

The raising of $350 in Liberty Bonds, aside from the work of the 
entire student body in purchasing War Savings Stamps, is significant 
of the earnestness with which St. Mary's girls are meeting the call of 
their country. 

This response from the students, two-fold in its result, first a "bit" 
towards helping the great loan, and then a larger "bit" towards the 
St. Mary's Endowment Fund, is far more than a "bit" in the spirit 
of the giving. 



The Gardeo is Growiog! 

We are keeping at it on sunny days, with hoe and rake, and the 
garden is growing ! If you do not believe it, come and see the crops : 
the lettuce, the onions, the radishes, the peas, the cabbages, etc., etc. 
It is a comforting sight to the hard-working war gardeners at St. 
Mary's to witness the fruits of their labors thriving in the sunshine. 



2 The St. Maky's Muse 



and it is a tremendous inspiration towards the extension of the garden 
crops. And the satisfaction of the gardeners in seeing the first red 
radishes appear with lettuce on the table as a positive proof of their 
efforts is almost too much for those who are not in the garden teams 
"Just watch our garden grow !" 



"Clean-Up Week" 

When "Clean-up Week" struck Raleigh it found St. Mary's girls 
enthusiastic advocates and ready workers. In fact, so great has been 
the enthusiasm that every free hour of daylight has found girls on 
the campus with hoe and rake, scythe and grass mowers. They are 
out before breakfast, after breakfast, after lunch, and after school, 
and that is not all, for the extra hour of daylight that the Government 
has given us this year gives an extra hour of daylight after supper, 
and every rake and mower is busy until the study bell rings at eight 
o'clock. 

Those who volunteered for the clean-up work are divided into twos 
and each pair given a "plot" on the campus to put in apple-pie order; 
not only that, but to keep so until the end of the session. A "decora- 
tion" is to be given the girls who keep their plot best and the competi- 
tion is running high. The mowers are signed up for so far in ad- 
vance that those who are slow must hustle to catch up. And every- 
body is hustling! The weather is the only backslider; were it not 
for the rain all the grass would have been cut for Sunday, April 21st, 
and at the conclusion of "Clean-up Week" St. Mary's would have 
been ready to pass any inspection from the public eye. But the lost 
time will be made up immediately the sun appears. !N^o weather can 
discourage the St. Mary's clean-up workers ! 



The St. IIaet's Mijse 



LITERARY DEPARTMENT 

Edited by the Sigma Lambda Literary Society 



Marian Dkane, '19 
Kathaeine Parker Drane, '18 



Editors 



The Sun Dial 

Aline Hughes, '18 

In a low, old-fashioned garden, 

'Midst mignonette and phlox, 
Surrounded and protected 

By stately hollyhocks, 
For years, through sunny hours, 

The Dial had marked the time — 
Entwined with clinging flowers, 

Had well fulfilled its rhyme. 

Its face, all gray and aged, 

In letters worn and old, 
Bore the simple motto, 

TTie Dial's duty told: 
"I mark the sunny hours." 

And many a child andi man 
Had stooped above the Dial 

Those happy words to scan. 

From childhood on to manhood 

Those of that race and line 
Had read the Dial often 

In hours of gay sunshine. 
The happy, chubby children 

Had stretched! on tiptoe there, 
Their proud, intent young heads now bent 

'Neath toss of sunny hair. 

And once, in softest moonlight, 

A man and maiden fair 
Had leaned above the Dial 

To read the message there. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



And later, when the sunny hair 
And black had turned to snow, 

The same aged lovers often read 
The happy message through. 

And last there came a message 

From Britain's wise, great throne. 
The Dial heard and trembled. 

In grief all turned to stone. 
No longer could he mark the hours; 

He was now an hour too slow. 
In shame he blushed, and bid the flowers 

All o'er his face to grow. 



Soldiers All 

Elizabeth Waddell, '19 

The hour was late and the evening twilight was taking the place of 
the afternoon sunlight. The low underbrush, just turning a light 
green, contrasted with the darker green of the tall pines. A tiny path 
was the only opening through the thick spring growth. Down this, 
path a tall boy in uniform hurried along, but stopped beneath an old 
pine that cast its shadows across a cool, babbling mountain spring. 
The boy was scarcely twenty-one, but was slightly overgrown. His 
dark eyes and hair shaded in with the tan of his skin, and his muscu- 
lar limbs added to his well-built frame. A white setter stood at his 
side and watched at intervals the boy's movements and the long wind- 
ing path that led to the valley. He seemed almost to understand the 
circumstances that were weighing themselves in his young master's 
mind, for at every far-away beat of the drum he would listen intently 
and sniff the ground. 

They stayed there only a few moments, this solemn, yet con- 
genial pair, for the boy had taken his last drink in the familiar spring 
and was shouldering again his gun and knapsack. He gave a sad but 
stern command to the dog, who understandingly turned and slowly 
trotted up the now darkening trail. The boy's eyes dimmed for a 
few minutes as he turned in the opposite direction. He knew the 
touching meeting that would take place in a tiny cottage back up the 



The St. IIaey's Muse 



trail as soon as the dog should reach it. And, indeed, it was a touch- 
ing one. A little woman in black had not moved from the spot of 
parting until she heard the quick pant of the dog beside her. Then 
she stooped and put her arms around him and buried her face in his 
tangled white hair, the first tears of sorrow filling her eyes. But only 
for a moment did they stay, for she, too, was willing to do her part 
cheerfully. Instead, she smiled and murmured a little wordless 
prayer in her heart, which so many mothers have so often said, "God 
help me to be a soldier with my son !" 



The r^omaoce of a Cf^ristmas Package 
Makiax Draxe, '19 

It was Christmas Eve night and the people of Carrsville were de- 
termined to give the soldiers who were encamped there a jolly good 
time. They were all assembled, a gay, laughing crowd, in the large 
town hall, which was all aglow with lights, warmth, and cheer. The 
Christmas tree was loaded with bags and Red Cross Christmas pack- 
ages for the soldiers, and was glistening with lights and candles. 

The young girls of Carrsville distributed the packages among the 
boys, who were scattered about the room. Murray Stanley had re- 
ceived his presents and, having slipped from the crowd, was standing 
in the far end of the hall, unaware of the noisy crowd, gazing intently 
at something he had found hidden in one sleeve of the warm woolly 
sweater which was in his package. 

"Hey, Murray! What's this, a love letter hidden in your pack- 
age ?" greeted Bill Whitley, his chum. 

Slipping the note in his pocket Murray answered him : 

"iSTot quite, old sport. Only a Christmas wish, and a mighty good 
one, too. It makes a fellow feel like life is pretty much all right, 
after all, when he realizes that there are people in the world who can 
send such a sincere wish to a stranger." 

"Well, who is this person who has got you going so ?" Bill asked, 
showing increasing interest. 



6 The St. Mary's Muse 

"Slie signed her name 'Dorothy Hunt/ and she seems to be going 
to school at Wellington." 

Bill's face lighted up with surprise, but when he answered Murray 
there was no sign of the scheme which was working in his mind. Bill 
was a lover of jokes, and here was a good chance to have some fun 
with Murray. 

"Murray, I dare you to write to that girl and make her think her 
fine sweater has been wasted on a good-for-nothing, ignorant Sammie 
who doesn't know how to appreciate it." 

"She is not the kind of girl who would mind that at all," protested 
Murray. "But I will take you up on it." 

The next morning when Dolly Hunt got her mail she found a small, 
dirty, cheap letter addressed to her in a smudgy handwriting. 

"What on earth is this ?" she wondered, looking at it more closely. 

"It's that letter you have been expecting from Joe Green of the 
Army," giggled one of the girls who was coming out of the post- 
office with her. 

"Well, I am sure I would ask Joe Green to use a typewriter if he 
can write no better than this," answered Dolly, laughing. Tearing 
it open, she read : 

Miss Hunt: 

The packag i receved and the swetter is nice an warm, also i like the letter 
an if you want to do a good turn hy a lonesom soljer pleas mum rite to me 
agin. yours truly, 

MuEEAY Stanley. 

"He must be a rough one," thought Dolly. "But maybe this is one 
way I can do my bit." 

When Murray received an answer from Dolly Hunt it was just 
what he had expected — encouraging, cheerful, and friendly. Having 
decided that she was a girl in a hundred and certainly worth know- 
ing, he determined to meet her. He did not show his answer to Bill, 
and when the next letter came from Dorothy Hunt he forgot to show 



The St. jMaey's Muse 7 

that to Bill. "Anyway," tie tliouglit, "Bill is showing too much in- 
terest, and this is my job." 

Their correspondence kept up for several months while Bill was in 
training, and with every letter from her his determination to meet her 
was strengthened, as also was his desire to drop the illiterate letter 
writer's part that he had taken up on Bill's dare. 

Early in May, Murray was given a two-day's furlough. His family 
lived far away and it only took him a minute to decide where he was 
going. So when he announced his intention of going to Wellington 
everybody took it as a matter of course — that is, all except Bill, who 
looked on in silent enjoyment. 

"Goodbye, boys!" he called back as the train was leaving. "Bill, 
you had better come on and chaperone. Don't worry, I'll have a 
good time, all right !" 

Murray settled back in his seat as the train started forward for 
what seemed to him was going to be a long trip. But the pictures of 
the coming meeting were so interesting and so pleasant that he was 
startled when the porter called "AA^ellington ! All off for Wellington !" 

It was late afternoon and, having gotten a room at the hotel, he 
called Wellington College, and after waiting for an interminable 
time, under the circumstances, he heard Dorothy's voice at the other 
end of the line. 

"And what time may I come — eight o'clock 'i All right, good-bye," 
and Murray hung up the receiver, keyed up with anticipation. 

"Y7ell ! I am certainly in it now !" exclaimed Dolly in amazement 
to the girls around her. "You know that poor soldier boy I have 
been writing to, to try to cheer him up ? Well, he is in to\vn and 
coming out to call !" 

"You're not going to let him come, of course," said Jane, who had 
rushed over to the phone to hear who and what the phone call was for 
Dolly. 

"Yes, I am, too — he seemed to want to come very much, and, well, 
I feel sorry for that boy. Anywaj — " Dolly paused ; she knew 
that the hour would not be wasted for him, she would make him enjoy 
himself — for Dolly was that kind. 



The St. Maey's Muse 



"All right, I only liojDe you enjoy wasting a perfectly good evening 
on an ignorant, boring stick !" Jane flung back as she went out. 

"Don't you worry. I bet I will !" 

Eight o'clock came, and so did Murray Stanley, right on the stroke. 
He did not have to wait long before Dolly, a tall, dark-eyed Dolly, 
walked in, smiling cordially and holding out a welcoming hand to 
him, whom she found to be tall and of an entirely pleasing appear- 
ance. 

Murray smothered his amusement as they sat down and surprise 
dawned gradually in Dorothy's face — and increased more and more 
at every word he spoke, though she was making every effort to con- 
ceal it. 

"He really seems to be very nice, and, well — his English is 
PERFECT !" thought Dolly in growing amazement. 

So evident was her astonishment and confusion that Murray could 
stand it no longer and plunged into explanation. 

"You see, I liked that first note of yours so much that I decided I 
would like another, and when one of the boys joked me into using that 
pose of an illiterate Sammie, I decided it would be a pretty good 
plan. That was a good turn Bill "VyHiitley did me!" he laughed. 

"Bill Whitley!" exclaimed Dolly. "Why, he is one of my best 
friends. We used to climb trees together ! Do you know him ?" 

"Slightly," answered Murray — a light was dawning. "We have 
chummed together since our second year at college. He did not tell 
me he knew you. Well, I never ! — but that is Bill. I might have 
guessed." 

When ten o'clock came the big school bell rang and Murray had to 
leave, after a delightful evening for them both ; but he had permission 
to come again as soon as he could get another leave. 

Dolly was silent when the girls questioned, and they drew their own 
conclusions with reference to the "stick." 

When Dorothy unwrapped a huge box of pink roses next morning 
she gathered them up in her arms, murmuring, "And to think ! if it 
had not been for that note in the Christmas package all this could 
never have happened !" 



The St. Maet's Muse 



Tbe Biography of a Piece of Cb^wiog Gum 

Lucy Lay, 'S3 

"The first thing I can remember is being sold by an old South 
American woman to a man in a white uniform, after first being rolled 
into a little ball. I was put in a basket with a great many other little 
balls and soon felt that I was moving. I could hear water beating 
against something, so I very naturally concluded that I was on board 
a boat." 

"After we arrived at our destination we were put through many 
very painful processes, of which I have only a vague memory. I do 
remember, however, that at the end I was pressed out flat and a very 
pretty girl wrapped me up in a piece of white paper. I had heard 
one of the workers in this factory remark on how busy they were with 
an order for ten hundred thousand packages of chewing-gum for Red 
Cross 'comfort bags' for the soldiers. Of course all this meant noth- 
ing to me then, but later I understood it. A bright red wrapper was 
slipped over me and I could see no longer. All was pitch-black 
darkness." 

"Well ! I wish you would look, a package of Wrigiey's pepsin chew- 
ing gum ! Well, old friend, I certainly am glad to see you ! I 
haven't had any Wrigiey's since I left England a month of Sundays 
ago," said Dick Brewster, an American aviator behind the lines 
"Somewhere in France." 

"Here. Tom, you take one, and Jim, you the other. I am going to 
give the others to the little Virginian who has been looking so blue 
lately, and take mine up with me this afternoon. General Roberts 
just told me that I would have to go on an errand for him this after- 
noon." General Robert's "errands" were famous for their dangers. 

"Well, Dick, here's the best o' luck; we have to go for our instruc- 
tions now. We don't envy you much, though." His chums shook 
hands with solemn thoughts in their hearts but smiles on their faces, 
for they allowed themselves neither to show nor voice their fears. 



10 The St. Mary's Muse 

"This says 'good for the nerves, clears the brain,' so you need not 
worry about me," laughingly replied Dick, placing the chewing gum 
in his coat pocket as the friends parted. 

It was nearly four that afternoon when Dick's machine glided 
gracefully off the landing field into the air. He was a little late and 
slightly worried because his engine had behaved a little queerly that 
morning and he had forgotten about it until too late to have it over- 
hauled by the mechanics. He could not stop now, for General Rob- 
ert's directions had been, "Go straight over the enemy's line, as high 
as you can fly, and investigate the moving troops from the left of the 
line to the front of the right." Dick was now almost as high as he 
had been directed to go, and for the first time in any flight he experi- 
enced a little dizziness. He must dart downward now so that he 
would be able to take the pictures of the left line. Just as he started 
his drop he heard an anti-aircraft rifle bullet go "ping" by his shoul- 
der. "A close miss," he thought to himself, continuing his downward 
flight. A minute later he heard another "ping." Heavens ! it was 
in his gas tank. What was he to do ? The priceless fluid was dripping 
already ; it would take scarcely a minute to empty it. He snapped 
the camera while he had a chance, but how could he get back with the 
films ? Suddenly a saving thought struck him. He had one lone 
piece of chewing gum in his pocket. Hastily reaching there, he took 
the gum, chewed it up, and stuck it over the hole from which the gaso- 
line was escaping. 

Saved ! at least for the moment ! He continued his flight, now 
pressing to the right. Reaching there without any mishap, he took his 
second picture and returned to his lines. 

Late that evening Dick Brewster was the happiest man in Trance ; 
at least he thought so. General Roberts had told him that the fllms 
had turned out very plainly and had already proved their value to the 
Staff in that plans for the attack of the morrow had been made. 
"And all because of one little piece of chewing gum," thought Dick. 
Hov^ true that old folk song, 

"For the want of a nail 
The kingdom was lost!" 



The St. Mary's MrsE 11 

T^e Letter That Was Never finished 

AroREY Stoxe. '19 

''Polly, the 53rd lias arrived in Trance." 

Polly glanced up from the book which she was reading. 

''T\Tiat was that, mother ?" 

''The 53rd Regiment arrived in France yesterday," repeated Mrs. 
!Rorfleet, who had just come in. 

''Why, mother, surely Tom has not gone to France so soon. Why 
didn't he — " 

With that Polly rushed blindly out of the room, trying to conceal 
the fast-gathering tears. Her mother saw, however, but understood 
as only mothers can. 

Alone in her room, with her head buried in her pillow, pretty blue- 
eyed Polly jSTorfleet sobbed out her sorrows. Why had not Tom 
written her ? It had been six weeks now since any letters had come. 
In fact, there had been no communication since his last furlough 
home. Up until then her old chum had written her constantly dur- 
ing his time spent at the officers' training camp, and then after he 
had become Lieutenant Tom Jackson. They had been the best of 
friends since infancy. How she even now loved the old doll that he 
had saved his pennies to buy for her ! Together they had romped, 
played, and studied through their school days. Then had come the 
parting of the ways when Tom had entered Harvard two weeks before 
she left for boarding school. There had been letters, however, and 
vacations, too — no chance for either Tom or Polly to forget. In 
Tom's sophomore year war had been declared on Germany and, al- 
though only twenty, he had left college at once and entered Oglethorpe, 
but first had gone by to see Polly. 'Twas then she had known. How 
proud she had been to introduce the tall, handsome "soldier-to-be" to 
all her friends ! To Polly, now so unhappy, that seemed 3'ears ago, 
whereas in reality it had only been about eleven months. Since then 
samething had changed Tom. "Perhaps he has fallen in love with 
some other girL" She began sobbing anew at the thought. He had 
been the same old Tom on his last furlough, or he had seemed the 



12 The St. Mary's Muse 

same in what little time she had seen him. He had only been there 
four days, and, unfortunately, Cousin Jack had been spending his 
furlough with them at the time. Even at the station, when she and 
Jack had gone to see him off, she had noticed nothing different. Tom 
had gone on back to camp and, just as formerly, Polly had waited, 
but no letters had come. Being only eighteen and very light-hearted, 
she had not given up hope entirely until today. "There were many 
things, she thought, ''that could have happened to keep him from 
writing." But now he had gone to France without so much as writ- 
ing a card to her. At last, exhausted from continuous sobbing, Polly 
fell asleep, and so her mother found her several hours later. 

Two years later we find a much older looking, soberer Tom, now 
Captain Jackson, "going in" again, but this time as an old veteran at 
the fighting game. For no longer does his heart stop beating when 
one of the numerous rats shoots by his face while out on a promenade 
along the sand bags. Long since he had become accustomed to sleep- 
ing in cold, damp cellars overrun with big, black rats. 

As Tom took his place in the front-line trench again just two years 
after his departure from America, some one on the right cautiously 
greeted him : 

"Why, hello, Tom Jackson ! I never thought to see you or anyone 
else from home here tonight." 

Tom turned. By the light of a flare out in "JSTo Man's Land" he 
recognized his companion on the right. 

"John Trenton ! of all people. When did you get here ?" 

It was no other than Polly's Cousin Jack. Very quietly they 
talked over the happenings back home, but neither mentioned Polly 
because Tom, although dying to ask about her, was too proud to do so, 
and Jack thought Tom knew more than enough already about her. 
Finally the latter asked : 

"How's Polly, Tom?" 

"Polly?" 

"Yes, Polly. Don't try to appear so innocent. Do you think that I 
am not on to it after all these years ?" 



The St. Maey's Muse 13 

"John Trenton/' began Tom, "yon don't mean that ! Why, I 
thonght that yon yonrself were engaged to Polly." 

"j\Ie ? Whatever made yon think that i Polly JSTorfleet has never 
given one single thought to any man except you." 

Tom was dazed. 

"Well, Jack, when I was home on my last furlough current report 
said that you and Polly were engaged, and until tonight I had be- 
lieved it. I stopped writing to her without any explanation, for, 
loving her as I did, I could not write as a friend to her whom I 
believed engaged to another. But if the Lord lets me live until to- 
morrow I will — " 

Suddenly a blinding red flare lighted up the sky behind and with 
a whistling sound their shells were on the way towards the Boche 
trenches. It was the signal for the first three waves to get ready to 
go "over the top." Tom was ready. He had been over before and 
had been wounded, but for all that he was as willing and eager to go 
as the latest newcomer. A line of bursting shells lighted up IS^o 
Man's Land. Then the big guns behind both lines began thundering 
at each other. Shells went flaring, screaming, and bursting through 
the air. Several men wounded and a few killed fell around Jack 
and Tom. Soon the word came down : "First wave get on and near 
the scaling ladders." Ten minutes afterward with the blast of the 
whistles another order was sent along the line : "Over the Top With 
the Best of Luck and Give It to Them." 

Tom and Jack rushed out over ]^o Man's Land. The German 
shells were flying in every direction. Men were falling on every side. 
But Tom went on. Suddenly he stumbled over a falling body. It 
was J ack. He turned aside and rushed on in his wild frenzy to reach 
the first-line Boche trench. All at once he saw coming, aimed at him, 
a hand grenade. There was a terrific explosion. Tom iSTorfleet had 
fallen wounded in ISTo Man's Land. 

As the new nurse came on duty early Tuesday morning in the sec- 
ond ward of an American base hospital "Somewhere in France," the 
convalescing patients welcomed her joyously but with a multitude of 



14 The St. Maey's Muse 

requests. From one to another of this "down-hearted" bunch she 
went, doing each one's bidding, until she reached the last bed, wherei 
a man lay with bandaged eyes. She started back and almost fainted. 

"Tom!" she gasped. 

Quickly she gained control of herself and went forward. In a 
strange voice she inquired. 

"Is there anything you would like me to do ?" 

"Yes," he answered, seeing and knowing nothing of all that was 
going on in the new nurse's mind, "I want you to write a letter for 
me — an important one to The Girl back home." 

Scarcely breathing lest she should reveal her identity, Polly ISTor- 
fleet, the new nurse, sat down by Tom's bed. She had never thought 
that she would have to undergo the ordeal of writing a letter for him 
to the girl who had taken her place. It would have been better to 
have stayed at home. 

Then he began his letter : 

"My Dearest: 

"Will you ever forgive me? I was wounded, but not seriously, in a raid 
last week. Today I am in V. hospital, but not for long. Jack told me all 
just before he went 'West,' and I'm coming home, Polly — " 

"Tom !" 

Her heart was too full to say more, but there was no need. Eyes 
were not necessary for Tom l^orlleet to claim his own. His letter 
was finished, but in a different way. 



Robert Halg, flmsrican Citizen 

Aline E. Hughes, '18 

It was a warm May night, and Middleton, a small city in the 
northern part of the United States, lay calm and sleepy under the 
starlight, waiting for the glow in the eastern sky to brighten into 
moonrise. Spring was in the air. It was felt even by Robert Haig, 
as he paced up and down beneath the elm trees, now fast paling into 
their spring garb. But Robert was not thinking of the springtime. 



The St. Mart's Muse 15 

He was grappling with the hardest problem that had ever confronted 
him during the years of his hard young life. 

Early in his life he had realized the dominating will of one per- 
sonality, his father's, and, moreover, he had realized the purpose that 
had gTiided that will of William Haig, naturalized American, late 
Gustav von Handenburg, German citizen. Always the German 
tongue had been spoken in the privacy of the home, and it was Der 
Vaterland that was the moving purpose surrounding and enveloping 
his father's life. When William Haig had been summoned home 
across the sea to serve his fatherland with the skill he had acquired, 
he had gone obediently, even gladly, to that service, leaving his nine- 
year-old son in his wife's charge with full instructions that he should 
follow in his father's footsteps. Robert remembered his mother's 
tears and promises when his father left, and at first they were faith- 
fully carried out, but she was a frail little woman. Deprived of a 
will to dominate her o^vn, she had let herself drift on, breaking one 
promise after another until she had slipped out of Robert's life and 
left him to face the world alone. Alone, yes, and yet not once had he 
been free from the power of that arm stretched out across the sea, an 
arm indeed that through his father's influence had smoothed the way 
before him to education and opportunity, and yet an arm that ever 
forced a consciousness of the power of its grasp. More than once he 
had wished to join his father in Germany — ''but no, you are needed 
most in Amerika." And then his father had died. 

It was shortly after this that Germany had invaded Belgium. 
Robert had devoured all the information he could get ; he had suffered 
with the Belgians over the horrors of Louvain and Bruges; yet his 
love for his Fatherland and his sense of loyalty had bid him keep 
faith through all. The arm across the sea had bid him wait until 
called. 

It was then that his little friend and playmate had become to him 
"The Little American." A daughter and granddaughter of Army 
officers, her patriotism was summoned forth to the highest extent by 
the trumpet of war. Of course she had immediately wished to be- 
come a Red Cross nurse, but when her parents refused, her ardor, not 



16 The St. Maey's Muse 

in the least qiienclied, turned eagerly to Red Cross work at home, to 
the supporting of a Belgian war orphan, and to the stirring up of 
patriotism in all of her friends. But in this latter regard Robert 
Haig was her stumbling block. 

"Don't you hate, hate, hate those horrible Germans ?" she had 
demanded of him indigTiantly. And he had said no, facing the bat- 
tery of her blazing brown eyes, and knew in saying it that he was 
facing his final sentence from her. His stand, however, had strength- 
ened him in his loyalty for a brief time, and even now it brought a 
glow to his face to know that he had stood as a soldier should. He 
had taken his medicine, too, "standing by his gun." In the lan- 
guage of their childhood she had said in a quiet, tense voice, "Bobby, 
I cannot play with a German. I am an American. Good-night." 

He had left her home miserable, lonely, trying to smother his 
loneliness with the thought that he had been true to his father and to 
Germany. This smothering process was rather a failure, for though 
he would not retract one step from the stand he had made, yet deep 
inside of him he knew, knew well, that he, too, was an American, 
He loved the great Avide land that had been his home, its ideals and 
all that it stood for. 

And so the years had slipped by — one, two, nearly three — and the 
United States, April 6, 1917, entered the world war against Ger- 
many. In Middleton a parade and other patriotic demonstrations 
had celebrated the occasion. During a speech on the Old Middleton 
village commons Robert had found himself on the edge of the crowd, 
beside a very much excited young person in Red Cross costume. She 
was trying to help her curly-headed little brother, with brown eyes 
much like her own, to see the speaker. Robert remembered now 
the child's face as he looked up at his sister. 

"Margy, I isn't comfable." 

He had gently lifted the little fellow to his own shoulder, meeting 
iier eyes across the curly head as he did so. After the speech was 
over, when he tried to lift Billy from his shoulder, the chubby arms 
had clung around his neck and the baby voice had said : 

"Go's nice man. We bes' sojer mans for Unc' Sam." 



The St. IIaet's Muse 17 

Dazzled by tlie charm of Billy's smile, lie had glanced at Margue- 
rite, to hear her say, "I am sorry yon have not seen fit to stand on 
Uncle Sam's side. Come, Billy. Thank you, Mr. Haig." 

That was a month ago, and he recalled how proudly she had 
walked away, the little boy waving his flag. And tonight, for his 
father's sake, he must do that act which would turn that proud head 
away from him forever. Must he do it ? His inheritance and train- 
ing bade him obey without question the summons of that arm across 
the sea. Yet must he have no loyalty for this land of his own, of his 
life and love? Der Yaterland was truly his father's land, but this 
was his; this great big, independent, democratic America was his 
own homeland. 

He put his hand to his head as if to erase something from his 
sight, but it stood there in bloody letters, that summons to "Come to 
the Old Home Cafe at 11 p. m., Tuesday. Be prepared to serve. 
Third table to right." He had figured out the code and knew well 
what the summons meant. The prospect of such a summons had 
long hung suspended over his head. Should he, must he, obey it? 
If he did not they would "get him" sooner or later, and death would 
be mild in comparison to the treatment he would receive. His 
mother's and father's last instructions to him had been, ''Be true to 
the Fatherland." Against them stood his heart and soul, both for 
America, and the words of Marguerite, 'T am sorry you cannot be 
on Uncle Sam's side," cut him to the quick. Faster and faster 
Robert Haig walked in the dark shadows of the elms. It was ten 
minutes of eleven. Vaguely he heard music; what was it? He 
stopped, some one was singing. Sweet, clear, proud, and triumphant 
the words rang out on the night : 

"Then conquer we must, 
For our cause it is just, 
And this be our motto, 
'In God is our trust' 
And the star-spangled banner — " 

He whirled about and looked into a brightly lighted room, across a 
dark la"\vn. Just inside the long open window stood a slender, dark- 



18 The St, Mary's Mtjse 

eyed girl, pouring out her song, unconscious of the man alone out- 
side, conscious of only one listener, for at her side, his cocked hat 
over one sleepy brown eye, stood Billy, gravely saluting the flag of 
which she sang. 

Outside a man felt peace — peace at last had entered his sorely 
wrung heart. His weary head dropped to his hands. 

"Mein Gott !" The old familiar language slipped unconsciously 

from his lips. He only knew that he was saved; saved from that 

evil against which his whole being rebelled — better death than that. 

He straightened and stood with bared head until the joyous strains 

were over. His soul was at peace. They might "get him," but what 

did he care, for 

"Conquer we must, 
For our cause it is just — " 

A week later in a training camp in the South a new recruit to 
Uncle Sam's Army proudly gave his name, "Robert Haig, American 
Citizen." 



The St. Mary's Muse 19 



SCHOOL NEWS 



March 22(1: Mr. Fraiife A. Whipple, of Hampton Institute, Addresses the 

School in the Parlor 

On Friday evening, ]\rarcli '22d, 'Mr. Frank A. Whipple, publicity 
agent of Hampton Institute, Hampton, Va., accompanied by a col- 
ored quartet from the Institute, gave a most interesting program in 
the Parlor. After Dr. Lay's pleasing introduction of Mr. Yrhipple, 
the quartet sang several well known negro songs, such as ^' Steal Away 
to Jesus," '^Swing Low, Sweet Chariot," etc., immediately followed 
by Mr. Wliipple's address in the interests of the Institute. 

He told of the small beginning of this now large and splendid 
Institute, begim with a few small buildings and now numbering over 
one hundred and fifty, covering many acres of ground, accommo- 
dating over a thousand students. All the buildings were erected by 
the students themselves, who are taught all trades at the Institute. 
The great farm is run by the students, as are all the necessary indus- 
tries connected with the life of the Institute. Mr. Whipple gave 
some striking illustrations of the ideals and standards set by the 
school for its students carried by them back home. To work where 
they are most needed and where they can do the greatest good to the 
greatest number of their people is one ideal well worked out in the 
plan of community service by summer trips in different communities 
to spread the canning industry and others, directed towards the 
uplift and welfare of the negroes of the South. 

We were all greatly pleased with Mr. Whipple's manner of address 
and glad to learn of the fine work of Hampton Institute and its 
growth. We will certainly speak a good word for it at every oppor- 
tunity, and appreciated greatly the part of the quartet in the program 
which was so delightfully arranged for us by Mr. Whipple. 

March 23d: 3rr. George B. Lay Lectures on Birds 

On Saturday, March 23d, Mr. George B. Lay gave a lecture in the 
St. Mary's Auditorium on ''Birds." Mr. Lay is a member of the 
Audubon Societv of America, and is now a senior at the Universitv 



20 The St. Maey's Muse 

of ]^ortli Carolina and acts there in the capacity of assistant in the 
geology department. He has delivered this lecture, with a splendid 
collection of slides, in a number of places, and he certainly showed 
himself well up on his subject. Mr. Lay's lecture was most interest- 
ing, especially to those present of the ISTature Class at St. Mary's, 
and we wish him all success in his further work along this line. 

March 25tli; Volleyball Game 

On Monday morning, March 25th, the ''Gym" was the scene of an 
exciting double-header in volleyball. The first teams played a close 
game which closed with a score of 31-29 in favor of the Mus. The 
second teams, which played between halves, also ended the game in a 
Mu victory. 

The line-up for the first-team game was as follows : 

Mu Sigma 

Browne, E. Cooper, N. 

Burke Battle (Capt.) 

Powell (Capt.) Waddell, E. 

Barber Hoke 

Lay, N. Royster, V. 

Hill, R. Collier 

Glass Mullins 

April 4tli: Expression Recital 

On Thursday afternoon, April 4th, a most enjoyable entertain- 
ment was given in the Auditorium by the Expression pupils. The 
program was as follows : 

I 

"THE LITTLE MINISTER"— Barrie 
Scene: At Nanny's Cottage 

Cast of Characters 

Babbie Rebecca Baxter 

Gavin Disliart Mary Moffitt 

Nanny Katherine Batts 

The Doctor Beatrice Turner 

II 
"A Second Trial" Mary Hoke 



The St. Maky's Muse 21 

III 

Springtime a la Carte Axxie Higgs 

IV 

Da Thief , 

Fleurette I Alice Seed 

Going Home ) 

V 
A Sisterly Scheme Ruth Russell 

VI 

Scene in a Restaurant (a monologue) Dorothy Kiktlaxd 

A very appreciative audience gatliered to hear tlie recital and all 
the selections were splendid, especially those by Alice Seed and 
Dorothy Kirtland. The scene from ''The Little Minister" was very 
well rendered, and those taking part deserve a great deal of credit. 
The part of "Babbie/' taken by Rebecca Baxter, was very natural 
and attractive, and the Little Minister and Doctor vrere properly 
dignified, while Xannie with her Scotch dialect and j^itiful awe of the 
two dignitaries was unusually good. The audience could certainly 
thank the Expression pupils and Miss Davis for a very enjoyable and 
entertaining afternoon. 

April 8th: The Second Facclty Recital 

The second facultv recital of the year was given in the Auditorium 
on the evening of Monday, April 8th, by Miss Louise SejTtiour, piano, 
assisted by Mrs. E. Blinn Owen, lyric soprano. 

The best example of perfect time and technique was probably the 
Sonata C major by Beethoven, which was most thoroughly appre- 
ciated. 

The Xews and Observer of the next day said : 

"Miss Louise Seymour of the St. Mary's faculty gave a most finished and 
delightful recital last night, assisted by Mrs. R. Blinn Owen, lyric soprano. 
Miss Seymour made a success of the evening, her playing is most satisfying 
andi interesting. Mrs. Owen possesses a voice of light quality and her high 
notes come with ease and purity. There was a good audience despite the 
rain." 



22 The St. Mary's Muse 

The program was as follows : 

I 

Prgeludium and Gigue (from First Partita) Bach (1685-1750) 

Sonata, C major, Op. 53 (First movement) . . . .Beethoven (1770-1827) 

II 

Petites Roses Cesek 

A Toi Bemlierg 

Aria, from "Morning of the Year" Cadman 

Mabel Sells Owen 

III 

Impromptu, A flat major 

^ ,, , ^ . 0/102^^(1810-1849) 

Ballade, G minor ^ ^ 

IV 

Serenade, B flat minor, Op. 3 Rachvianinoff (1813-) 

Romance, Op. 24 Siielius ( 1865-) 

Impromptu, F minor, Op. 31 Faur6 (1845-) 

April 9th: Secretary McAdoo Addresses Kass Meeting at City Auditorium 
as the Third Liberty Loan Campaign is Launched 

On Tuesday, April 9tti, Secretary of Treasury, William G. Mc- 
Adoo, addressed a great mass meeting in the City Auditorium, as 
part of the city's program in launching the Third Liberty Loan cam- 
paign in Raleigh. In spite of the cold wind and rain the large build- 
ing was full to overflowing with an enthusiastic crowd to hear the 
message of our renowned Secretary. All the schools and colleges 
were represented in full, the day having been made a half holiday in 
the city, and the Boy Scouts and employees of the ]Sl^orfolk Southern 
Railway were there in uniform, adding to the representations. Amer- 
ican flags and the Third Liberty Loan posters efl'ectively decorated 
the stage and balconies, the latter with their messages of ''Don't be a 
slacker. Be a Liberty Loan backer!" "Halt the Hun," "Fight, or 
buy a bond," etc., attracted everyone. The State College boys in 
their khaki uniforms filled the middle balcony, and during the time 
before the progTam began their band played popular war songs such 
as "Over There," "Good-bye, Broadway, Hello France!" and others, 
much to the enjoyment of the gathering crowd. 



The St. Mary's MrsE 23 

As Secretary ]\Ici\.doo, tlie Governor of the State and otlier promi- 
nent representatives took their places on the stage, from A. & E. came 
the bugle call "Attention !" and all the boys rose while the large 
Service Flag of the college was unfurled, showing nearly a thousand 
stars. The audience cheered again and again. 

The formal program was opened by the singing of "America" by 
the audience, led by Mrs. Horace Dowell. The chairman then intro- 
duced Governor Bickett, who made a delightful and pleasing speech 
introducing Secretary McAdoo to the assembled crowd. The audi- 
ence rose to its feet with cheers as Mr. McAdoo acknowledged the 
introduction. He told them in his quiet, business-like way what they 
could do individually to help in the loan campaign, from buying a 
Thrift Stamp to buying a big Liberty Bond, or in wearing haK-soled 
shoes and omitting woollens from their dress. He explained in detail 
the magnificent life insurance and compensation plan of the United 
States Government for our soldiers, and sailors in the service of the 
country now in effect. He emphasized the importance of each of us 
doing our all with all our might in the gTcat crisis that is facing us 
and our allies. He took his seat amid a storm of applause from an 
audience which he had more than convinced of the crvino- needs of 
our country, each determined to do all possible towards raising funds 
for the country's need, if only that of buying a Thrift Stamp. Can't 
you see Uncle Sam pointing his finger at you, as he is doing in that 
famous poster, and saying, "Have YOU done and given ALL you 
could ?" 

St. Mary's attended the mass meeting in full number and with full 
enthusiasm for the pushing of the Third Liberty Loan. The School 
regTetted the fact that Mrs. McAdoo, a St. Mary's alumna of recent 
years, could not accept the invitation to be in Raleigh and pay a visit 
to her Alma Mater at this time. 

April 13th: The Return Class Parties 

SOPHOMORES TO SENIORS 

On Saturday night, April 13th, the Sophomores entertained the 
Senior Class in the Muse Boom. Soon after the guests arrived a 



24 The St. Maky's Muse 

very original guessing contest began. The "School Picture Frame" 
disclosed a succession of tableaux representing familiar advertise- 
ments and it was great fun to guess them. There were ''Overland 
Cars/' "Campbell's Soup/' "Buster Brown Stockings/' "Kohinoor 
Snap Fasteners/' "A Skin You Love to Touch/' "Cream of Wheat/' 
and others. At the last "Rastus/' of Cream-of- Wheat fame, walked 
out of the frame with refreshments for the guests — not Cream of 
Wheat, though ! The refreshments were delicious and everybody 
was enthusiastic over the corn-bread fingers, a war-time substitute 
for cake. 

FRESHMEN TO JUNIOES 

On the same evening the Freshman Class entertained the Juniors 
in the Parlor, where a delightful dance was given in their honor. 
The room was attractively decorated with the colors of the two classes. 
There w^ere the Grand March, "Paul Jones/' and other figTires, as 
well as the one-step and waltz. Delicious punch was served through- 
out the evening with corn-bread fingers, the now popular substitute 
for cake at St. Mary's these war times. The evening was immensely 
enjoyed by both Freshmen and Juniors. 

THE "peeps." 

And the "Preps." having no sister class to entertain, and feeling a 
bit ostracized, had a party in the "Gym" to which all the members of 
the class were cordially invited. The feature of the entertainment 
was a contest in representing some other girl in school. Some of the 
take-offs were splendid. Dancing followed throughout the evening 
amid a great deal of amusement over the various costumes. There 
were no refreshments ! It being a cold, rainy night, the Preps, 
decided to postpone the refreshments until a hot afternoon ice-cream 
party could be held, thus wisely planning two parties in the place of 
one ! (But it must be added that the Freshmen were most generous 
with their punch at the back Parlor door, which the Preps, passed on 
the way from their dance.) 



The St. Maky's Muse 



25 



April 15tli: Spring Athletic Meet 

On Monday morning, April 15th, the Spring Athletic Meet was 
held on the basket-ball field. Mus and Sigmas were out in good 
numbers with plenty of enthusiasm. The field days are looked for- 
ward to with intense interest and are probably the most interesting 
athletic events of the year for the two associations which take part. 
The Fall Meet, it will be remembered, was won by the Mus with a 
score of 260 — 2381/2- The scoring this time was somewhat different 
in the method of averaging points, each event counting 20 points, with 
first, second, and third places counting 5, 3, and 1, respectively. The 
scores were a tie in events, each side winning three of the six events, 
but the Sigmas made 26 points in taking first, second, and third places 
in the Running Broad Jump, Basket-ball Distance Throw, and first 
and second places in Hop, Step, and Jump, giving them the victory 
with a score of 86 — 61. 

The scores of the different events were as follows : 



Individual Scores 
Events Sigma Mu Sigma 

Running broad jump 195 160 20 

Longest Jump: Cooper, N., 14^4'''' 5 

Hoke, 14^3'^ 3 

Parks, 12'11'^ 1 

Potato race 

Basket-ball distance throw 20 

5 
3 
1 

Pitch ball 20 

Hop, step, and jump 

1st. Cooper, N., 29.11 5 

2d. Hoke, 29.7 3 

3d. McMullan, 26.9 

Relay 



Mu 




20 






20 



1 

20 



86 



61 



ary's Muse 



Subscription Price ' One Dollar 

Single Copies ^ <,<<,, ^ , Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's 
School, Raleigh, N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnas, under the 
editorial naanagement of the Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF, 1917-1918 

Aline E. Hughes, '18, Editor-in-Chief 

senior reporters 
Kathaeine p. Drake, '18 Elizabeth MoM. Folk, '18 

junior reporters 
Helen Van W. Battle, '20 Ellen Lay, '19 

Mildeed Kibtland, '20 Alice Seed, '20 

Agnes T. Pratt, '18, Business Manager 

Mary C. Wilson, '20, , 

Louise Toler. '19, ^ Assistant Business Managers 



EDITORIAL 



The garden work lias recently been held up by the weather, but 
the gardeners have merely laid their hoes aside to bring them out 
again with the sun. They have been very faithful and energetic 
about the work, and the garden has shown good results. 

The Red Cross members have lately been engaged chiefly in finish- 
ing up the eight layettes for Belgian babies. These are practically 
completed now and will be turned over to the Raleigh Chapter. Of 
course, too, the socks and sweaters have been growing, and knitting- 
bags are always in evidence. 



The St. Makt's Muse 27 

Twenty-six of the Red Cross members have been taking a course in 
Surgical Dressings. The girls and teachers were divided into two 
groups and instructed by members of the Raleigh Red Cross chapter, 
Miss Sarah Cheshire and her assistant, Miss Gladys Dewar, teaching 
one class, and Mrs. Ashe and her assistant. Miss Coke, teaching the 
other. The work in these classes was faithfully done, and all those 
who have stood the examinations have come through with flying colors. 

We are very proud, of course, of the hearty response to Dr. Lay's 
suggestion about the $100 bond in the Third Liberty Loan, but have 
we paid for all our Pay Days and for our Muse, and have we all 
bought our Thrift Stamps ? Do not forget these things. You know, 
as Mr. McAdoo said, it is the little things that will help — buying a 
Thrift Stamp, having our shoes half-soled, and so forth. Of course 
a $100 bond seems lots bigger than a twenty-five-cent Thrift Stamp, 
but if it is the most you can do, of course Uncle Sam will be mighty 
glad to have you do it, and then you are not giving but lending, to- 
wards an awfully good investment for yourself, too. Is your Thrift 
Stamp Club leading this week ? If not, see what you can do to give 
it a shove forward. 



Miss Urquhart Witb tl^e Red Cross 

Miss Helen Urquhart, for the past five years in charge of the Latin 
at St. Mary's, received an emergency call to the Xational Eed Cross 
Headquarters in TVashington the last of April, and on being released 
from her duties at St. Mary's by the Rector, she left for Washington 
in time to take up her new work on May 1st. She has a secretarial 
position at the Headquarters and is much pleased with the oppor- 
tunity for service which the work affords. Miss Daisy Waitt, a grad- 
uate of St. Mary's and of Columbia University, has taken Miss 
Urquhart's work at St. Mary's for the rest of the session. 

Miss Urquhart has taken a deep interest in the Red Cross work in 
Raleigh, and after completing a course in shorthand and typewriting, 
has been acting as volunteer secretary to the Assistant Divisional 
Director of the Red Cross at Raleigh. 

Miss L'rquhart's address is care Xational Red Cross Headquarters, 
Washington, D. C. 



Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Cruikshank, Alumnae Editor 



St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

HoNORAHT President - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

Honorary Vice-Presidents - / ^'■^- ^- ^''^- Pi"i°ger. Raleigh. 

I Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham. 
President _ - _ - Mrs. John H. Holmes, Chapel Hill. 

Vice-President _ _ _ Mrs. Walter Grimes, Raleigh. 
Secretakt _ _ _ _ Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer _ _ _ _ Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 



Elise Gordon Stiles (S. M. S. I9I1-'I3); 1893-1918 

Shortly after midnight on the night of May 1st the Ocean Steam- 
ship Company's steamer "City of Athens," a few hours out from ]S[ew 
York City on its way to Savannah, was rammed by a French cruiser 
inward bound and sunk in some ten minutes. Though the warship 
used every effort to save the passengers and crew, only half of those 
on board, about seventy in all, could be saved. Among the lost was 
Miss Elise Gordon Stiles, very dear to a legion of friends she made 
during her four years at St. Mary's, as well as to many who have 
known her elsewhere. In her St. Mary's suffers the first loss among 
those who have been a part of the School, which may be attributable 
to the war. 

Miss Stiles gTew up at "Malbone," the family home, on a planta- 
tion near Cartersville, Ga., and entered St. Mary's in September, 
1911. She specialized in Domestic Science and took the Certificate 
at the Commencement in May, 1913. The following September she 
returned as Assistant Housekeeper, which position she filled very 
satisfactorily for two years. In October, 1915, she entered the 
Training School for N'urses of St. Luke's Hospital, ISTew York City, 
and was graduated with her class on April 25th of this year. During 
the late winter she suffered from a serious illness and had not entirely 
regained her strength. She was therefore advised by the St. Luke's 
Hospital physicians to spend the summer in rest and was on her way 



The St. Mary's Muse 29 

home for that purpose, expecting to return to the Hospital to com- 
plete her course in the fall and then take up her profession. 

Miss Stiles had many devoted friends among her St. Mary's and 
St. Luke's acquaintance, and her loss is deeply felt. 



From Some St. Mary's Girls io Wartime 

Vacation Farm Work at Vassar 

Yassae College, Poughkeepsie, IST. Y., April 18, 1918. 

Your letter gave me a great deal of pleasure. ... I look back 
upon that year I spent at St. Mary's as the happiest of my life. . . . 
I wonder what it is that is so wonderful, that all the girls who ever 
went there dearly love it. I never spent an unhappy minute there. 

It was most interesting doing farm work Easter vacation, but I 
must admit it was a bit strenuous. After a few days, however, I 
became quite accustomed to it and managed to work seven hours a day. 
Some of the girls worked up to eight hours, but I found I could ac- 
complish more by seven hours hard work than by trying to stretch the 
time over eight. I am so glad the St. Mary's girls are gardening, 
too. . . . Most sincerely, 

Jacksoxia Watt. 

(Jacksonia Watt, whose home is at GrifBn, Ga., left St. Mary's in October, 
1915, to take up a course in The Hartridge School, New Jersey, in preparation 
for Vassar. She graduated last year from the Hartridge School, and is now 
in her Freshman year at Vassar. She was one of the group of Vassar girls 
who gave up their Easter vacation to work on the college farm.) 

A news item in the Neiu Yorh Times said of this : 

"Twenty Vassar girls who volunteered to remain over at the college for the 
Easter holidays are toiling every day in the Shakespearian gardens. Dressed 
in middy blouses, bloomers, and heavy sweaters, they start at 7:30 o'clock in 
the morning and work all dtay. They are manifesting considerable enthusi- 
asm for their work, and are looking forward to the summer work on the 
farm. Forty-four girls have already signed up for the regular farm work." 



30 The St. Mary's Muse 

— — — — ■ — i 

The War Spirit in the Cold Spell at Goucher 

GoucHEK College, Baltimore, Md., March 9, 1918. 

Our Class Letter ( which is still alive) and the individual girls I 
hear from keep me in touch with the old life, so that I scarcely realize 
how many changes must be taking place. . . . Today is marvel- 
ously bright and springful, and I only wish it were possible to run 
down and spend a few hours in that lovely old grove. . . . My 
semester grade card, which just reached me, shows that my third 
term's work has been satisfactory. Our examinations this year were 
very delayed for, because of coal shortage. College was forced to close 
a week early just before Christmas, and after vacation there was 
hardly a week when we didn't miss a day. Administration buildings, 
of course, had to be shut down on Monday, but in order to bridge this 
we had classes in the parlors and halls of the dormitory buildings, and 
made up laboratory on Saturdays. I don't think I shall ever forget 
those first three weeks in January. The halls were only half -heated, 
for some of our boilers had burst, and then, of course, we never had 
more than twenty-four hours of coal ahead. It was simply bitter out 
of doors, and there was no use in going to libraries or homes out in 
the city, for every one was in the same boat, and through it all I 
think the spirit in college was better then than I've ever seen it — less 
complaining and more effort to really see things through — to make 
the best of everything. 

Father returned to Mexico the first of January, and I had hoped 
that mother and I could join him there this summer. However, I 
feel that there is a more urgent call just at present for the college 
graduate than tripping about, so I am planning to spend the summer 
definitely preparing myself for some phase of war work. Just at 
present the Vassar idea seems quite inviting and practical. 

Sincerely, 

JoSEPHIlSrE S. WiLSOlSI". 

(Miss Wilson, wlio graduated from St. Mary's in 1916, is this year gradu- 
ating from Goucher College. Of her record there St. Mary's is proud. Since 
she wrote the foregoing letter she has qualified as an interpreter in Spanish 
in the Government service, and will take up her new work just as soon as she 
is able to leave Goucher.) 



The St. Mary's Muse 31 



From the Front 

Xo. 6, General Hospital, B. E. F., France, 

March 30, 1918. 

At last I have a definite address and I would so like to have The 
Muse sent me here. We have been here about four weeks, but it has 
seemed impossible for me to write. When we first arrived we lived 
in seclusion, as one of the girls developed measles, and only came out 
of quarantine in time for the "drive." At present we are very busy — 
in fact, it is simply impossible for us to do all we should. The 
"Tommies" are wonderful, so brave and plucky — never a moan, no 
matter how much pain they endure. I have never seen such suffering 
before. 

I am so glad of my training — I really never appreciated it before — 
for it lets me do what little I can to help, and the whole thing is so 
frightful one could never realize it unless they were here in the midst 
of it all. It certainly is for all of us not to do our bit, but just a 
bit more than we possibly can. Sincerely yours, 

Dorothy V. Brown. 

(Dorothy Valentine Brown came to St. Mary's from her home in Ruther- 
ford, N. J. She left St. Mary's in May, 1911, and trained for three years in 
the Training School for Nurses of St. Luke's Hospital, New York City, in 
which course she has heen follov/ed by a number of St. Mary's girls — Julia 
Horner Cooper, '14, Arabelle Thomas, Annie Huske Robinson, '17, and Nancy 
Woolford being there at present. Since her graduation from St. Luke's, Miss 
Brown had been practicing her profession in New York City. She sailed for 
France with a Red Cross unit in January.) 



All Hail, America! 

A St. Mary's girl who has lately won special honors is Miss Selma 
Katzenstein, '90, now president of the Dallas (Texas) Conservatory 
of Music. Miss Katzenstein entered the country-wide contest started 
for the selection of a new national anthem of which both words and 
music should be entirely American, and was awarded first prize in 
the Philadelphia district for her anthem, "All Hail, America !" for 
which she both composed the music and wrote the words. 



32 The St. Maey's Muse 

Miss Katzenstein came to St. Mary's from Warrenton, IST. C. Both 
Miss Dowd and Mr. Owen think highly of her new composition. 
"All Hail, America!" has been endorsed by the Texas Senate as a 
State and ISTational anthem, and Miss Katzenstein was invited to Fort 
Worth to conduct the anthem sung by a large chorus of soldiers 
accompanied by a military band of fifty pieces. The anthem has also 
won decided favor in a number of States with the Congress of 
Mothers. 

The words of the anthem are as follows : 

Dear land of ours, may Heav'nly powers 

Protect and guard thee ever; 
And guide thy path, and give thee faith, 

Andi joy in high endeavor, 
To seek the light in honor's eyes, 
Nor he content vi^ith lesser prize; 
To strive to win a noble fight 
In God's most holy sight. 

Chorus: 
All hail, America! 
Our love for her, a very star, 
Shall light our way to Heaven's door, 
And joy forever more! 

"We'll sing in praise of other days, 

And many a deed of glory 
Of thy great past, whose fame shall last 

And ring through song and story. 
Of triumphs of thy daughters fair 
In noble lives beyond compare. 
And battles by thy brave sons fought. 
And many a wonder wrought. 
Chorus. 

Not hate, but love shall thy heart move 

For men of every nation, 
Whom wondrous fate sends to thy gate 

To seek for their salvation. 
Beneath thy skies they shall rest, 
And joy and freedom on thy breast; 
Their noble worth thou'lt reverent learn, 
And with love's ardor burn. 
Chorus. 



The St. Mary's Muse 33 

TTiy hero-sons shall train their guns 

'Gainst wrong and fell oppression; 
Brave love shall lead on honor's steed, 

And gain at last possession — ■ 
Of strongholds where the intrenched foe 
Their flaunting tokens boldly show, 
The banners of the right unfurled 
Shall float o'er a new world! 
Chorus. 



flluronae Visitors 

Among the girls of recent years whom it has been a pleasure to 
have back at St. Mary's from time to time lately have been Helen 
Peoples, '15, of Townesville, X. C, now teaching in the Suffolk, Va., 
High School; Fannie Stallings, '16, of Suffolk, teaching this year in 
the County High School at Drivers, Va. ; Lula Jones, of Martins- 
ville, Va., who visited Ag-ness Pratt ; Martha Wright, of Boardman, 
]Sr. C, Ethel Yates, of Camden, S. C, and Frances Hillman, of 
l^ashville, Tenn., who had been making a round of visits and went 
from St. Mary's to !N^ashville ; and Elizabeth Tarry, of Townesville, 
jST. C, so well remembered in St. Mary's dramatics and through her 
part in the Song Book. 



Alumnae Weddings 

Sauxs-Roberts : On Saturday, April 6th, at Wesley Monumental Church, 
Savannah, Ga., Lois Mershon Roberts (S.M.S. 1914-'15) and Mr. George 
Elton Sauls. 

Pritchett-Leak : On April ... at Wadesboro, N. C, Effie Shepherd Leak 
(S.M.S. 1910-'12) and Dr. Charles Bernard Pritchett. 

Robertson-Rosemoxd: On Monday, April 15th, in Christ Church, Greenville, 
S. C, Sue Gordon Rosemond (S.M.S. 1913-'14) of Hillsboro, N. C, andi 
Mr. Owen R. Robertson, Lieutenant National Army. 

Da\ts-Bro'wn: On Tuesday, April 23d, at Concord, N. C, Lucy Young Brown 
(S.M.S. 1909-'10) and Mr. Amos Davis. At home, Winnsboro, S. C. 

PERLEY-SLOcxJiiB : On Saturday, April 27th, at Fayetteville, N. C, Helen Terry 
Slocumb (S.M.S. 1908-'10) and Mr. Fred A. Perley. At home. Black Moun- 
tain, N. C. 

Cook-Smith: On Tuesday, April 30th, in St. Thomas' Church, Washington, 
D. C, Olive Ernestine Smith (S.M.S. 1909-'14) and Major Giles Bernestine 
Cook, Surgeon, 116th Infantry, United States National Army. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Patronize those who patronize you. Remember that it is 
the advertisers who make the publication of the Muse 
possible. 

DON^T FORGET 



206- JO MASONIC TEMPLE 



KING^CROWELUS DKUG STORE 

and SODA FOUNTAIN 

COPvNER FAYETTEVILLE and HARGETT STKEETS 



Success in the Campaign for the Raising of the $250,000 
Fund to pay off the debt and provide additional new build- 
ings, and the beginning of an Endowment Fund is of the 
utmost importance to St. Mary's. 

Think of it, talk of it, and help in every way you can. 



The 
Best in 
Groceries 



Phones 667-658 528 Hillsboro Street 



'You get them when promised" 



Hortoh s Studio 

Masonic Temple 



'Workers in Artistic Photography" 



Advertisements 



?^. Mary's Girls Always Welcome at 

Hudson-Belk Company 

Full line of Ready-to-wear, Hosiery, Gloves, Furnishings, Dry 
Goods, Shoes, Toilet Goods, Ribbons and Laces 



ESTABLISHED 1858 

H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

R.ALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 


60YLAN-PEARGE 

COMPANY 


The Greatest Store 
in the City for the 

SCHOOL GIRLS 


M. ROSENTHAL & COMPANY 

GROCERS 

Wilmington and Hargett Streets 


SEE 

HERBERT ROSENTHAL 

FOR REAL SHOES 


CAMOUFLAGE 


ON THE FARM 



The honest farmer's apple crop 
Has been dispatched to town. 

The barrels look this way on top: 
0000000000000 

And this is lower down: 

ooooooooooooo 

— Selected. 



Why Is 

Brantley's Fountain 

the 

MOST POPULAR? 

Ask the Girls 



MARRIAGE INVITATIONS AND 
VISITING CARDS 

CORRECTLY and PROMPTLY ENGRAVED 

Send for samples and prices 

Edwards & Broughton Printing 
Company 

Steel Die and Copper Plate Engrarers 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Adveetisements 



HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 

THE WAKE DKUG STOEE 

Phones 228 


-1 

HICKS' UPTOWN DEUG STOEE i 

Phone 107 
PROMPT DELIVERY 


Thomas H. BriggS & Sons Base Balls, Basket Balh 
The Big Hardware Men Raleigh, N. C. Tennis and Sporting Goods 


Ealeigh French Dry Cleaning Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets. 


Call OLIYE'S BAGGAGE TEANSFEE 

Phone 529 


PESCUD'S BOOK STOEE 

12 W. Hargett St. 


DARNELL & THOMAS 

ONE-PRICE MUSIC HOUS^ 


RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 

CHOICE CUT FLOWEBS 


T. F. BROCKWELL \ 
All Kinds of Keys. Bicycle Supplies, 
Tj'pewriters of all Kinds Repaired. 



Hush, little Thrift Stamp, 

Don't you cry; 
You'll be a war bond 

Bye and bye. 

— Selected. 



Stationery, College Linen, Pennants, 
Cameras and Supplies 
Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 

JAMES E.THIEM 

BeU Phone 135 RALEIGH, N. C. 



CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE 

FINE CANDIES PURE ICE CREAM 
FRUIT 

We carry the most complete line of Fruit an d 
Candies in town. 
111 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON CO. 

Coal, Wood, Ice, Brick 

122 Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. 0. 



H. STEINMETZ— FLOBIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, "Wedding Bouquets, 
Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, aU kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. C. Phone 113 



CAROLINA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light and 

Power and Gas 

1376— BOTH PHONES— 1377 



WALK-OVER— The Shoe for You . 
Walk-Over Shoe Shop 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

S. GLASS The Ladies' Store 

Everything up-to-date for Ladies, Misses 

and Children. Ready-made wearing apparel 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. 0. 

Wm. Heller 

THE FOOTERY SHOP 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Adveetisements 



THE FASHION 

KAPLAN BROS. CO. 
The college girls' store for Snappy, Classy, 
Youthful Garments and Millinery. 



TEN PER CENT DISCOUNT TO COLLEGE 
STUDENTS AND TEACHERS 



ORDER YOUR CUT FLOWERS 

FROM 

J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Phone 149 



w C f-if*^ S »■ 




» Exclusive 
§ Millihery 



RALETIGH- M.C 



WHITE ICE CREAM CO. 

BEST 
ICE CREAM 

Phone 123 

WILMINGTON STREET 



Their meeting it was sudden, 

Their meeting it was sad; 
She gave away her bright young life — 

The only one she had. 
And there beneath the willows 

Is where she's lying now: 
For there's always something doing 

When a freight train meets a cow! 

— Selected. 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company Home Capital 
Safe, Secure, and Successful 

OHAS. B. JOHNSON, President 

A. A. THOMPSON, Treasurer 

R. S. BUSBEE, Secretary 


Insure Against Loss by Fire 
Best Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 

Charles E. Johnson, Jr. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
SHOES AND HOSIERY 




WATSON PICTURE AND ART CO. 

Picture Frames and Window Shades. 


C. D. ARTHUR City Market 
FISH AND OYSTERS 


SHOES! WHOSE? 
BERNARD L. CROCKER 

124 Fayetteville Street 


ELLINGTON'S ART STORE 

RALEIGH. N. C. 

Colleg-e Pennants, Pillows. Pictures, 
Frames, Novelties 


GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 
Fire Insurance 


EOTSTER'S CANDY A SPECIALTY 

Made Fresh Every Day 



Advertisements 



THE YARBOROUGH 



Raleigh's Leading and Largest Hotel 



Dinners and Banquets a Specialty 



B. H. Griffin Hotel Co., Proprietors 



Jolly & Wynne Jewelry Cq. 



COLLEGE 
JEWELRY 



128 Fayetteville St. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



YOUNG & HUGHES 



Plumbers 

Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating 



S. Wilmington Street 



"I don't like your heart action," the doctor saidt, applying the stethoscope 
again. "You have had some trouble with angina pectoris." 

"You are mighty right, doctor," said the young man, sheepishly, "only that 
ain't her name." — Selected. 



AIL 



Premier Carrier of the South 



Most Direct Line to all Points North, South, 
East, West 



Through sleeping cars to all principal cities, through Tourist Cars 
to San Francisco and other California points. All-year tourist 
tickets on sale to principal Western points. Convenient local, as well 
as through trains. Electrically lighted coaches. Complete Dining 
Car Service on all through trains. Ask representatives of Southern 
Railway about special rates account Christmas holidays; also about 
various other special occasions. If you are contemplating a trip to 
any point, communicate with representatives of Southern Railway 
before completing your arrangements for same. They will gladly 
and courteously furnish you with all information as to the cheapest 
and most comfortable way in which to make the trip. Willi also be 
glad to secure Pullman Sleeping Car reservations for you 



H. F. CARY, General Pass. Agent, 
Washington, D. C. 



J. O. JONES, Traveling Pass. Agent, 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Advertisements 



i^afapette 



A Cafe which invites the patronag-e of ladies. The girls of St. Mary's ■will enjoy 
the beauty and convenience of our modern, 'well-appointed dining' place. 

Fayetteville Street, next to Almo. 



See us for PORCH FURNITURE 
Royall & Borden Furniture Co. 

FAYETTEVILLE, STREET 



Patronize 

STAUDT'S BAKERY 

Hillsboro Street, Near St. Mary's 

School 



Teacher: "What is lyrical poetry?" 

Pupil: "Poetry originally sung by a liar." — Selected. 



PERRY'S ART STORE 

S. Wilmington St. 


WORK CALLED FOR AND DELIVERED 
BELL PHONE 503 
SHU-FIXERT 


MOORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 

104 EAST HARGETT ST. Bell Phone 719 


J. R. KEE, Manager 103 Fayetteville St. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 

Shoes repaired while you wait. 

Come to see our modern plant. 


MISSES REESE & COMPANY 

MILLINERY 


L. SCHWARTZ 
RICHMOND MARKET 

Meats of All Kinds 


BATES-ARRINGTON & COMPANY 
PURE FOOD GROCERIES 



Norfolk Southern Railroad 



ROUTE OF THE "NIGHT KXPRESS' 



Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

DIRECT LINE BETWEEN 



NORFOLK 



RALEIGH 

NEW BERN 

GOLDSBORO 



Via WASHINGTON, KINSTON, GREENVILLE, FARMVILLE 
AND WILSON, TO POINTS NORTH AND SOUTH 

Electric Lighted Pullman Sleeping and Parlor Cars 



Fast Schedule, Best Service 



Double Daily Express Service 



Location Central for the CaroUnas. 



Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 



St. Mary's School 



RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women) 



T7th SESSIOi^T BEGINS SEPTEMBER 19, 1918 



session divided into two terms. 

Eastek Term began Janttaey 21st, 1918. 



St. Mary's 



1. TEE COLLEGE 

2. TEE MUSIC DEPARTMENT 

3. TEE ART DEPARTMENT 



offers 
instruction ( -4- TEE ELOCUTION DEPARTMENT 

in these ] 5^ rp^^ SOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT 
Departments I 

6. TEE BUSINESS SCEOOL 

7. TEE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 



In 1917-18 are enrolled 250 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty.^ 

Well Furnished, Progressive Mv^ic Department. Much Equipment New. 
Thirty-six Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and 
Dormitories. 
Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without 
slight to the Scholastic training. 
For catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, D. 0. L., 
Rector. 

XDWAIIOf k mOUCHTON rRINTINa CO.. tALIiaM. N. C 







^re=Commentement i^umlier 

iWap, 1918 



ST. MARY'S CALENDAR, 1917-18 



Saturday, May- 
Monday, May 
Thursday, May 



6: 8:15 p.m. 



9: 



Saturday, 


May 


11 




Sunday, 


May 


12 




Monday, 


May 


13 




Saturday, 


May 


18 




Saturday, 


May 


25 




Monday, 


May 


27 






May 


27-29 : 




May 


28-30: 




June 


1-4: 


Saturday, 


June 


1 





Sunday, June 2: 11:00 a.m. 



Monday, June 3: 



Tuesday, June 4: 



MAY 

8:15 p.m. Inter-Society Debate. Epsilon Alpha Pi 
vs. Sigma Lambda. 
Certificate Recital. Miss Dorothy Wood, 
Piano. 
Ascension Day. Holy Day. 
11:00 a. m. Holy Communion, with Sermon. 
Exercises Commemorative of Alumnae Day. 
1:15 p.m. Alumnae Luncheon. 
2:45 p.m. Meeting of the Raleigh Chapter. 
3:30 p m. Festival Program. 
Juniors entertain Seniors. 
Alumui^ Day. 76th Birthday of St. Mary's. 
Certificate Recital. Miss Alice Seed, Elocution. 
Annual "School Part3%" 
Annual Recital of the Chorus. 
Certificate Recital. Miss Helen Cooper, Piano. 
Senior Examinations. 
Final Examinations. 

JUNE 

Commencement Peogram. 
8:30 p.m. Annual Recital of the Elocution Depart- 
ment. Tennyson's "The Princess." 

Annual Sermon. Rev. W. W. Memmin- 
ger, D. D., Atlanta, Ga. 

Class Day Exercises. 

Annual Alumnse Meeting. 

Annual Concert. 

Graduating Exercises. Address by Rev. 
W. H. Milton, D.D., Wilmington, N. C. 

Annual Meeting of the Trustees. 



11:00 a.m. 

3:30 p.m. 

8:30 p.m. 
10:30 a.m. 

3:00 p.m. 



The St. Mary's Muse 

PRE-COMMENCEMENT NUMBER 
! Vol. XXII May, 1918 No. 9 

The Seventy-Sixth Commencement Season 

Commencement Program 

Saturday, June 1, 8:30 p.m. — Annual Recital of the Elocution Department in 

the Auditorium: Tennyson's "The Princess." 

Sunday, June 2, 11:00 a.m. — Commencement Sermon in the Chapel by Rev. 

W. W. Memminger, D.D., Atlanta, Ga. 
5:00 p.m. — Alumnae Service in the Chapel. 

Monday, June 3, 11:00 a.m. — Class Day Exercises in the Grove. 

1:00 p.m. — Alumnae Luncheon at the Woman's Club, fol- 
lowed by Annual Alumnae Meeting. 

5:00 p.m. — Annual Exhibit of the Art Department in the 
Studio, with Exhibits of the Domestic Art 
work and of the Red Cross work of the year. 

8:30 p.m. — Annual Concert in the Auditorium. 

9 : 30 p.m. — Rector's Reception in the Parlor. 

Tuesday, June 4, 11:00 a.m. — Graduating Exercises in the Auditorium; An- 
nual Address by Rev. W. H. Milton, D.D., Wil- 
mington, N. C; Closing Exercises in the 
f Chapel. 

Tlie Commencement season is a week later than usual, this year, 
on account of the week's delay in reopening after the Christmas 
holidays. 

The annual meeting of the Trustees is held on the afternoon of 
Commencement Day. 

There will be twelve graduates from "the College" this year, seven 
Certificates in Music, Art, Elocution, and Domestic Science, and a 
large number of Certificates in the Business School. 



The Muse 



LITERARY DEPARTMENT 



Edited by the Epsilon Alpha Pi Literary Society 

Henbietta Morgan, '18 "^ 
Elizabeth MoM. Folk, '18 \ Editors 
Helen Van W. Battle, '19 I 



DoQce of th)e fairies 

Mary T. Yellott, '21 

The twilight deepens, folding all the earth 

In shadows of the all-embracing night. 
A star is born; emboldened at its birth, 

The cricket strikes a treble chord, and light 
Flames up, around as if by magic, soft 

And flick'ring light of all the glowworm clan. 
That lends its aid at fairy meetings oft — 

At fairy meetings all unknown to man. 

A mystic ring of light is formed; without 

The darkness reigns. The cricket gives the sign- 
A thousand voices answer with a shout 

As the wee folk appear, a shimmering line 
Of fairy maids, in dewey cobweb clad. 

Led by the Queen herself, in gossamer 
Of rainbow spun — a fancy that she had, 

And most becoming. Now the orchestra. 

Without ado, struck up a lively air, 

The cricket at the fiddle leads the band, 
And every fairy cast aside dull care 

And danced in ecstasy, now hand in hand, 
Now whirled about alone. More loud and gay 

The music grows, till suddenly their mirth 
Dies — hark! the midnight hour! Each weary fay 

Has vanished. Darkness rules the silent earth. 



The Muse 3 

Cbapcl Mill 

Jane Toy, '20 

Chapel Hill, as its name implies, is situated among the hills of 
l^orth Carolina. On one of the hills, long ago, a Chapel was built, 
from which when later the town started it derived its name. Now 
the Chapel is forgotten, but the University town lives and flourishes, 
a memorial, as it were, to the little Chapel, and it is one of the pleas- 
antest and loveliest spots to be found throughout the entire South. 
Situated on the hill tops, it has a spirit of airy freedom, surrounded 
by woods on all sides. All around the town these woods extend, 
always within pleasant walking distance, and their nearness is eagerly 
taken advantage of by the inhabitants of the town. There are, easily 
accessible, innumerable paths leading into the woods and through 
them, always inviting a restful walk among the beauties of nature. 
The town itself is also, however, not lacking in natural beauty. It is 
simply laid out ; in fact, it seems to have had very little definite plan- 
ning, but to grow up as good sense, desires, and convenience dictated. 
One long street runs through the town, beginning and ending in 
country roads. Half way between the ends of this street, the busi- 
ness section of the town is located. On either side of this, and on 
the cross streets which meet the main one, homes are situated. These 
are neither elaborate nor pretentious, but as a rule pretty and com- 
fortable, especially so since most of them are set far back in large 
yards, the trees, flowers, and shrubs in which add greatly to their 
charm. 

Just below the "business section," before the homes begin, the Uni- 
versity is visible from the street. It is seen from behind an old rock 
w^all (these cementless walls of broken stone and covered with ivy 
are one of the characteristic features of Chapel Hill), extending as 
far as one can see a rolling green lawn, crossed by paths and dotted 
with many magnificent trees and stately stone buildings. When 
one enters between the stone posts, which form the gate, the impres- 
sion remains the same. As one advances other buildings are visible, 
and if one crosses the campus directly, the athletic field and the large 
stadium are reached. These, when deserted, have an air of greater 



The Muse 



lonesomeness and desertion titan any other part of the grounds, for 
the contrast between this desertion and their characteristic crowded, 
excited hustle is so great as to bring out the effect very strongly. In 
desolation, however, they possess a certain large, quiet beauty, and 
one can picture them filled with an enthusiastic throng of athletes. 
Coming back from the athletic field, the arboretum is visible at the 
right. This is a small park, or landscape garden, which has been 
developed comparatively recently. It is a beautiful spot, its curving 
walls, beautiful shrubs and flowers, all arranged to give exactly the 
right effect — the effect of orderly, restful beauty. 

It is not, however, only in the natural beauties of Chapel Hill that 
its charm lies, but in its mental and social atmosphere. This is one 
of occupation in a common, congenial work, accompanied by a wide- 
awake interest in world affairs, military as well as artistic and scien- 
tific. Chapel Hill, though far out of the path of the world's activi- 
ties, is neither asleep nor disinterested. Indeed, quite the contrary. 
It is vitally interested in all world affairs, and in the attitude toward 
them she shows a calm seK-confidence, as if rising superior to the 
material disadvantages of limited population and resources and out- 
of-the-way position, and taking her place among the larger towns or, 
in fact, great cities of the world. In this attitude there is no dis- 
satisfaction at their disadvantages, but rather appreciation of them 
as advantages and enjoyment of them as such. And it is in this, 
perhaps, that the greatest charm of Chapel Hill lies. The quiet en- 
joyment of the beauties and pleasures of the country, coupled with 
comprehending outlook upon the world. 



"That MoQtrose Kid" 

Jessie Moye 

Meekins came down the broad staircase of the Clutchfield mansion 
on his usual nightly round of inspection just as the old clock, which 
had been presented to the oldest Clutchfield by Louis the Fourteenth 
of France, tolled out nine strokes. 



The Muse 5 

Meekins, a stooped old darkey with graying hair, was a relic of the 
ante-bellum days. Under this old Southern roof he had seen the 
family live, expand, and then diminish to the last and only living heir, 
generally known as "Dr. Billy." As he pattered about, the old 
darky recalled with sadness the happy days before his young master 
and mistress had died, leaving Billy an orphan at fourteen. Meekins 
had been a kind and faithful protector, and after William had re- 
turned from college and had established a growing practice in the 
Southern city as a skillful surgeon, he began to cherish hopes of serv- 
ing another mistress. 

But it seemed that the house was doomed to misfortune. One 
night Dr. Billy again entrusted the care of the estate to the old servant 
and sailed away to some foreign port. 

And now, just as the ancient timepiece struck nine, a key turned 
in the latch, the door flew open, and there stood a dark and handsome 
young man clad in mufti, whose bags showed the wear and tear of 
much trouble. 

'To' de Lawd, Marse William!" exclaimed the old darky. And it 
was indeed ''Dr. Billy" who, after four long years of absence, had 
at last returned. "Fo' de Lawd ! Ain't changed a bit — nice an' 
brown in dem glad rags !" 

"Same old Meekins. How is everything?" the man greeted him. 
Then, glancing around, "Well, it is good to be back." He crossed 
the hall and passing his eyes over the handsome drawing-room where 
the family portraits had hung for centuries, he lingered over a por- 
trait of his mother, a laughing young girl, with a mass of yellow 
ringlets and eyes deep wells of blue. The old man followed his 
glance. 

"Gad !" he exclaimed. "That Montrose kid next door resembles 
her," and a queer, almost amazed expression came over his face. 

"In mo'n looks, suh," the old man echoed, and smiled furtively. 

"I would like a fire in the library, please." 

A few minutes later as he sank into the luxury of his great arm- 
chair, smoking his briar pipe, his mind recalled the gloomy afternoon 
when he had found "that Montrose kid" perched in the arm of this 



6 The Muse 

very chair, looking like a dainty yellow butterfly ready for flight. 
The Montroses — that is, Admiral Montrose and his seventeen-year- 
old daughter, Persis, ''The Kid" — were Dr. Billy's neighbors. Persis, 
a sensible child, quick to understand, kind to all, beloved of young 
and old alike, was not cut out for an irresponsible fly-away. She had 
learned at an early age the duty of service and had mastered more 
than the arts of interpretative dancing and making fudge. Dr. Billy 
was interested in this unusual child as he might have been in his own 
kid sister had she lived. 

That afternoon she had come over to help him "face it out" ! Had 
it only been four years ago, that afternoon ? 

"Dr. Billy" — she always struck straight at the point; he liked 
that — ''dad says you insist on staying here and seeing this thing 
through, but no man should try to bear up under the ridicule of those 
jealous gossips, and it is not fair to yourself." 

"Every man has misfortunes to strive against, Persis," he said, 
grimly. 

"Surely, but every man does not have a Helen North, ambitious 
for a family name and so on, to string him up and then drop him in 
favor of public opinion. The minx!" Her childish countenance 
was screwed into a funny combination of scorn and hate. He smiled 
in spite of himself. She continued : "You will have to go away from 
it all, anywhere; to India, say. There is lots you can do for those 
poor heathen." Here, indeed, was a ray of hope, but he answered 
dryly : 

"Rather anxious to put me out, eh ?" 

But she ignored this. "Dad and I are a kind of self-appointed 
rock of defense, and you must — it is quite the conventional thing to 
do, to nurse your broken heart, and India is the place to forget." 
That child was ingenious ! He had entirely forgotten that he must 
forget, and thought only of the cowardice it would be for him to 
leave. Trust Persis to put things in an agreeable light. But as Dr. 
Billy always made decisions, as well as incisions, quickly, "Kid," he 
said, "you are right, those Indians do need me. I am going." 

Helen had not acted well. When her uncle, whose heiress she was, 
had had a serious accident and was unsuccessfully operated on. 



The Muse Y 

Dr. Billy had his first "case." The staff had insisted that no one 
could have saved "the old money-bags" ; but tongues began to wag. 
The young doctor could not rest. He determined never to lift the 
knife again. It was all too much for the frivolous Helen, and with 
all good grace she broke the engagement. That plucky Montrose 
Kid, now, she — The clock striking twelve broke upon his revery. 
Meekins stuck his head in at the door. 

"Meekins, probably you are wondering at this sudden return ?" 

"Ain't no denyin' it, suh." 

"It is because the boys in France need me now worse than the 
Indian hospital, and my first duty is to my own country. I am leav- 
ing for France in a few days." 

"Leavin' agin?" The tones were pathetically disappointed. I 
wus hopin' " — but Meekins paused, embarrassed. "Yas, suh ! you is 
right. Dey needs you wus dan Ah needs a massa and mistis." The 
younger man wheeled. "You shall have her, Meekins, a new mis- 
tress, if she will agree. Funny, how stupid one can be. I have 
waked up night after night, out there in India, dreaming of some 
angel, and now I realize that it was not mother. It will be rather a 
shock to you, perhaps, and certainly none the less to me, but — " he 
paused in confusion. 

"Hits Miss Montrose! De Clutchfield blood do tell! An Ah 
knowed it all de time ! — cain't fool dis nigger, no suh." 

"And tomorrow we will see," the young man broke in. But at 
sight of the old negTo's face he stopped, his heart missed a beat. 
"What is it, Meekins ?" 

"De Admi'al, he had to go into suhvice, and Miss Montrose boun' 
to go into suhvice, too — she's a Red Cross nurse in France." 

"Pack my bags again, immediately. I will leave for France to- 
morrow." And the luckless Dr. Billy slipped away again as sud- 
denly and as quietly as he had come, leaving Meekins to wonder if it 
had all not been merely a dream. 

Two months of service in France ended in a futile search for 
Persis. Finally, still hoping, he settled in a hospital just behind the 
front lines. Here he performed many skillful operations and gradu- 
ally regained his self-confidence. A month later the Huns bombarded 



8 The Muse 

the position and many of the medical staff were wounded, and among 
them Dr. Billv, who received a paralyzing blow in his right side and | 
a piece of shrapnel in one eye. He could serve "over there" no 
longer, and he knew it. Thank God, Persis had sent him to India, 
for there he could still use his ability to good effect. In an uncon- 
scious condition he was rushed to the base hospital at G . 

When the little French surgeon examined his wounds. Dr. Billy 
heard him purr, ''An interesting case for my wife; will you ask her 
in, Henri ?" 

A dainty blue-eyed nurse made her way to his cot. 

"Persis!" At last — but the French surgeon's wife. My God! 
the usual luck. Why wasn't he used to it ? 

He sank into unconsciousness again. What he said in his delirium 
only Persis knows, but when he awoke she sat by his side, chafing 
his cold hands. 

She smiled as he recognized her again. "There is another way to 
serve, Dr. Billy, and one that appeals to me most for a while. Let's 
cable Meekins to expect his new mistress when you are navigating 
again." Then, twinkling over his puzzled look, added, "Surgeon 
Marchand's wife was too busy to see you then — " 

For once his lode star had not deserted him, and he decided that 
this was a fine old world after all ! 



The Autobiography of a Tl^rift Card 

Nina Cooper, '20 

My history began on December 24, 1917, when I came to the little 
town of "Spot Cash Crossing" in an express car. I was taken by a 
tall man and had my first stamp put on me. On December 25th, 
with one stamp on me, I became the property of a pretty little girl, 
who was very delighted at me for a X-mas present. From then 
on I took special note of my life. My little mistress dashed about 
the house, showing me separately to each of her brothers and sisters 
with the exciting remark, "Look ! what Santa Claus brought me." 



The Muse 9 

Santa Claus had also brought several other thrift cards to the other 
children of the family. A little boy of nine had a card with which 
I became very closely associated. Together we were kept by Daisy's 
mother, since our owners were so small that we could not be trusted 
to them. Our first week was very thrilling and exciting for us both, 
since we were pulled out and examined at all times of the day. We 
spent the greater part of our time, left alone in the same pigeon-hole, 
in long conversations. Our first conversation gave me a great deal 
of light on the story of our family. My companion had had his ears 
wider open than I, and so had caught more information, which he 
willingly imparted to me. I learned from him that the United 
States Government needed vast amounts of money, and one way of 
borrowing it was through us. We were to back the people to be 
thrifty and save. The Government's purpose was for every person in 
the country to have a thrift card, and when they decided to lend their 
money to Uncle Sam, instead of buying candy, ice-cream, or the like, 
they would buy a thrift stamp. A thrift stamp meant a great deal 
to my mistress, since her brother was going to France, and when she 
wanted him to know how she loved him, they had told her it would 
be by saving her money and buying stamps, which would give the 
Government money to buy big guns, ships, etc. 

One night we talked almost till sunrise. I said : 

"1 bet I am filled out first." 

"Oh, no, you don't know what a good master I have. He will make 
money and I know he will buy stamps with it." 

"Well, we will see who fills up first," said my companion. 

"Did you know their father promised the last four stamps to the 
one who gets a stamp on the twelfth spot first ?" 

"Yes, I am well aware of the fact, and am quite sure I will be the 
one," said he. 

The very next day my twelfth spot received a stamp ! Daisy, who 
was continually begging for the stamp which her aunt had promised 
for the twelfth spot, succeeded in making her aunt buy the stamp. 
She then put it on the twelfth spot ! 

The next night my companion was so furious he wouldn't speak 
civilly. "Well, it just wasn't fair," said he. 



10 The Muse 

"You can't say that, for Daisy's father is a lawyer, and would cer- 
tainly do right. You know our owners had saved their money, and 
I had seven and you nine stamps, then when Da.isy's aunt covered the 
twelfth spot she claimed the last four stamps, which was a bright 
idea." 

"Bright idea ! It wasn't fair, that's all." 

"Oh, yes, for her father said it was perfectly fair." 

But the next day her father gave four stamps to each of the chil- 
dren, and now I have only four spaces unfilled, while my companion 
has three. 

Weeks passed before we became any nearer filled out. Then the 
happy minute for me! Daisy's birthday came, and she would not 
have any cake, for she said the sugar and flour and money must all 
go to the boys in France, so Daisy's mother, instead of making her a 
cake, gave her four stamps, and so I beat my companion in filling out. 

The night of Daisy's birthday was our last night together, and 
when I said "Good-bye," my companion replied, "You certainly beat 
me fairly, but remember, though you become a war savings stamp 
tomorrow, I will become one in a few weeks. 

The next day I was deposited at the postofiicej and my place in the 
pigeon-hole was filled by Mr. Warsavings Certificate with a stamp on 
him. 



Only a Private 

Ellen Lay, '19 



"Want a ride. Mister Soldier ?" 

Harry Wooding glanced around at the grinning crowd of faces and 
saw that the shock-headed youth grasping the wheel of a rather worse- 
for-wear Ford had addressed him. I^ow, Harry had not received any 
invitations out to supper, dances, or joy rides during the months he 
had been at Camp Wister. He had come to the colors from a country 
town where he had led a farmer's life in the summer and attended the 
university nearby in the winter. Harry's comrades in training had 
found him an agreeable, bashful chap, easy to get along with, yet he 



The Muse 11 

seemed to prefer his own society to that of others. Harry was bash- 
ful. He had started off his career at camp keeping to himself the 
free moments, so that now he was forgotten among the boisterous 
crowd. He was feeling a little peeved with himself and terribly blue 
when this unusual form of relaxation unexpectedly presented itself. 

"Great little car all right," said the boy as Harry climbed in. 

"You betcha life!" responded Harry with feeling. 

"B'longs to m'uncle. Gosh! I bet he'd do something awful to me 
if he found out I swiped his car. Say, my name's Jimmy. What's- 
cher name ? What's-cher rank ?" questioned Jimmy, inspecting Harry 
for insignia of rank. 

"Harry Wooding, private," said Harry. 

"Humph, I bet if I was old 'nuff I'd be a captain or somethin'." 
Harry replied to this that somebody had to do the dirty work, and 
that anyway he expected to be a general before the war was over. 
Jimmy glanced at him sideways, taking the length and breadth, 
his honest gray eyes, black hair and ruddy skin, a figure which gave 
the impression of strength of mind and body. 

"Aw, well, I reckon you'll rise. You look like a captain, anyhow." 

"Why ?" asked Harry quickly. He wanted to learn. 

"Aw, I dunno ; you're big an' proud lookin' of Uncle Sam an' your 
men." 

"Well," sighed Harry, "I am only a private." 

"I bet-chu're a darn good one." 

"That hair ! those eyes ! Ye gods !" thought Harry. He knew that 
she was just freezing to death in her thin white costume, although it 
was early April, but she surely did look — Well, Harry longed to 
throw his warm sheepskin coat around her shapely shoulders and to 
fling his equally warm heart at her feet ! He strolled along looking 
for the best movie in town, which wasn't saying much. He noticed 
the girl laughingly waving to some one, and turning saw Jimmy in a 
miniature chauffer's costume gliding along in his uncle's Ford, bent 
low over the wheel as if racing and glancing occasionally at an im- 
aginary wrist watch. At the crossing Jimmy stopped in the middle 



12 The Mijse 

of the street, absorbed with gears and unconscious of the angry traffic 
around him. His acting was superb. : 

Laughing gleefully, Harry looked at the girl where she paused on 
the curb about two blocks away, staring with frightened look now up 
the hill above Jimmy, now at the boy in the Ford. Harry gave one 
glance up the hill, understood, and started on a run for Jimmy. 
Racing toward the crossing where Jimmy still stood came a huge truck 
piled high with a heavy load of barrels and boxes. The driver tried 
to stop it in vain. On it rushed. 

"Jimmy ! Get out ! Jimmy, do you hear ? Get out !" yelled 
Harry as he ran, for it was evident that Jimmy was trying to save 
the precious car in preference to himself. 

"Jimmy! Jimmy!" the whole street took up the cry. Harry ran 
on, stumbled, fell. The street groaned. The truck was almost on 
the boy. Harry was up and on again. Reaching the Ford, he 
snatched Jimmy bodily from the car and gained the sidewalk just in 
time as the big truck swung down on the little car, spinning it around 
and crushing it against a post. The street breathed again. 

Harry tenderly carried his little friend, who had fainted from fear 
and excitement, into a drug store. Jimmy soon opened his eyes and 
glanced up into his rescuer's face. 

"Gosh !" he murmured, as a girl pushed her way through the crowd 
and stooped over him. 

"Jimmy, darling, are you all right ?" she questioned eagerly. 

"Aw, cut out the soft stuff, Sarah," said Jimmy. Thus assured 
that her little brother was himself again, Sarah turned to thank his 
rescuer and caught him bashfully stepping into the background. 

"Say, Harry! You come back here!" commanded Jimmy. He 
turned to look straight into Sarah's tearful eyes. He never could 
recall just what happened next. He felt a warm hand grasp his and 
he clung to it unconsciously. He heard the girl say something about 
typhoid and his never having been strong since, and — a splendid and 
brave soldier in an emergency. He saw Jimmy sitting up and point- 
ing an accusing finger at him. 

"Say, Harry, you have been holding Sarah's hand for three minutes 
by my wrist watch." And he had blushed and come down to earth. 



The Muse 13 

"Won't jou let me drive Jimmy home ?" said Harry, turning 
eagerly to the girl. She expostulated, Jimmy was tickled to death, 
and it all ended by Harry's hastily dashing around the corner and 
excitedly borrowing ^'^the car" from his comrades. They had never 
seen Harry act so flustered and meandered after him "to see the 
show." When Sarah seated herself beside Jimmy in the car she saw 
four smiling soldiers standing at mock attention as Harry cranked 
up the Ford. He grinned sheepishly at them and jumped in the car. 

"Sarah, why don't-chu sit up in front with Harry ?" asked Jimmy, 
and Sarah saw Harry's ears grow red. 

"Well, you see, that would leave you alone — " 

"And if you two sit behind, you see, I have the engine for com- 
pany." 

"Oh, you made a rhyme, Harry!" exclaimed Jimmy. "Kiss the 
back of your hand, quick ! Let's see, a, b, c — first, last, first, last — 
oh, Harry, the first name of your best girl begins with S." The situ- 
ation was rapidly becoming embarrassing for the bashful Harry, and 
he was glad to reach Jimmy's house. 

"l^ow that your Ford is smashed up, Jimmy, you'll have to let me 
come and take you to ride." 

"Ain't-chu goin' to take Sarah, too ?" 

"Why, of course, if she has time, I er — er — " 

"I'd simply love to go," said Sarah. "By the way, Jimmy has not 
introduced us. I am his sister, Sarah l^ewsom." 

"And I am Harry Wooding, only a private. Miss ISTewsom." 

"You have proved yourself a general in heart, Mr. Wooding. 
Jimmy and I will be most proud to go with you. Come, Jimmy ; 
you look pale, child. Goodbye," she said graciously to Harry with 
a warm smile; "I hope you can come and see us soon." Harry could 
and would indeed. 

Harry returned slowly to the owners of the automobile, the better 
to collect his thoughts, and was received with jubilation. 

"Didn't know you had a girl. Wooding." 

"Some looker, too." 

"Gosh ! how'd yuh do it ? She was hypnotized all right." 



14 The Muse 

"You're some cool cucumber ! Why didn't yuli invite yer friends 
to ride with yuh ? Seems to me after lendin' yuh the swell ear and 
the gas yuh might-uv interdooced us. Why, yuh might-uv sold that 
gas for all we know !" 

A few weeks later as the notes of "taps" were sounding through the 
still air, Harry realized that he was the happiest man alive. He was 
no longer self-conscious, his bashfulness was leaving him. On his 
sleeve were his corporal's stripes. His captain had told him that he 
deserved them, that he was a born officer, and was liked by both men 
and officers. Harry had won something else he perhaps prized more 
highly. In those few short weeks Sarah had seen the splendid char- 
acter of this man, his big ideals, and had loved him. 

Once, when Jinuny, through no fault of his own, had given them a 
few short moments alone, Harry had spoken of his love, saying that 
of course she could not care for a fellow like him, who was only a 
private. But evidently Sarah did care, and a great deal was said in 
low voices, so low that Jimmy, surprising them, was not sure of what 
he heard. 

And now, as Harry drifted off to sleep, one May night, he thought 
again of his mother's letter, and of Sarah's mother's w^ords to them 
one night, and of that date next month when a slender band of gold 
should be added to the sparkling jewel already on her hand. 



The Muse 15 

In Ligl)ter Vcir) 

Mary T. Yellott 

The Theift Stamp Campaign 

"And have you bought your Thrift Stamp yet?" 

No? "Well, I have it here! 
Oh, come, you know you have the change — 

It's just a quarter, dear. 
You want your quarter for ice-cream? 

It would be nice, but how, 
Then, is the Kaiser to be licked? 

And think — the cream's for now, 
But if you get your stamp today, 

In Nineteen-twenty-three 
You'll get your quarter back again 

With interest, you see." 

And so the stamp is sold, and so 

You go without your cream. 
But you've helped to lick the Kaiser 

And bring triumph to your team. 



The '^Cleax-Up" 

Put on your hat and come with me, 

And see the sight there is to see! 

First, in the Grove, at least a score 

Of busy girls — or maybe more — 

Armed each with lawn mower or with rake — 

Why, what a difference they make! 

That high grass and those weeds are gone — 

'Tis really quite a pretty lawn. 

And all about the change is seen 

Where'er determined girls have been. 

'Tis war time — for your country's sake, 
Come out! Get busy with a rake! 

M. T. Y. 



16 The Muse 

The Sqijieeels' Cowsteenation' 

The squirrels gathered in the trees, 
In puzzled consternation. 
"Dear laughing girls, with scythe and mow, 
Do have consideration! 

"You're cutting down our hiding grass. 

Now wildish beasts will get us! 
We'd like to come right down and play, 
If you would only let us." 

"Oh, little squirrels, don't you know 

That 'Clean-up Week' has struck us? 
We've gardened and we've all Red Crossed 
Until this bright idea 'tuk' us! 

"So now we mow and cut and rake — 

It is a great improvement; 
But we can see your point, too, 
And we regret the movement 

"Should cause you inconvenience. 
But then — what can we do? 
It's Clean-up Week, and we must clean — 
We hoped you'd like the view!" 



There was a little Hun, 

And he had a little gun, 
And his bullets were all dumdum, dumdum; 

He shinned up a tree, 

To snipe what he could see, 
But now he is in kingdom come-come-come! 

— Selected. 

He may be ankle-deep in dust. 

Or middle-deep in slime. 
But Sammy with his mouth organ. 

He's at it all the time; 
And when we march up Potsdam Street, 

And goose-step through Berlin, 
Why, Sammy with his mouth organ he'll 

Play the army in! 



The Muse 17 

SCHOOL NEWS 



April 20: "Country Dance" Given by St. Elizabeth's Chapter 

On Saturday evening, April 20th, St. Elizabeth's Chapter gave a 
'^country dance" in the Parlor for the benefit of Christ School at 
Arden. At eight o'clock the farmer boys and girls began to ponr in, 
dressed in their best overalls and ribboned bonnets. Dancing was the 
feature of the evening and ice-cream cones were sold on the side-lines. 
The Virginia reel was a popular dance and the fiddle cheerfully sang 
out the while until the dancers stopped from exhaustion. The teach- 
ers joined in the fun, some even in costume, and there was never seen 
a jollier evening at St. Mary's. 

April 22: Third Faculty Recital 

The third Faculty Eecital of the season was given at St. Mary's 
on the night of April 22d by the Musical Faculty and Mrs. Hagedom. 
The Nexus and Observer of the next day said : 

"Tlie Recital of American Music given by the music faculty of St. Mary's 
School and Mrs. Gustav Hagedorn, Monday evening, proved a most interesting 
and enjoyable program. 

"The 'Maestoso' movement of MacDowell's Sonata Tragica was the opening 
number, and Miss Rebecca Shields interpreted it with dignity and power. 
The group of songs by MacDowell and Chadwick, sung by R. Blinn Owen, 
with Miss Seymour as accompanist, was an artistic number, received with an 
enthusiastic appreciation which made one feel that the singer's voice is too 
seldom heard in recital. Mr. Owen responded to the applause with a charm- 
ing encore, 'I Had an Old Black Mammy Who Used to Sing to Me,' by Harriet 
Ware. Whelpley's dainty melodious composition for two pianos, 'In the For- 
est,' and 'Serenade' were effectively given by Miss Martha Dowd and Miss 
Martha Roberts. 

"An interesting feature of the program was Edwin Grasse's Sonata for 
violin and piano, by Mr. and Mrs. Gustav Hagedorn, who gave an able and 
musicianly rendering of the work. (The Sonata is dedicated to Ysaye by the 
composer, a blind young violinist, who reveals much power in the field of 
composition both for piano and violin.) 

"Miss Marion Thompson sang, with her usual finish and purity of tone, a 
varied group of songs, all of which were enjoyed, especially 'Allah,' by Chad- 
wick, and 'Love's Lament,' a setting of Eugene Field's poem by Mr. R. Blinn 
Owen. 



18 The Muse 

"Miss Louise Seymour played, as always, with masterly technique and con- 
vincing interpretation a Barcarolle by Chadwick, the 'Rainbow' by MacDowell, 
and 'Novelette' by MacDowell. 

"The stage was beautifull decorated with roses and flags, and at the close of 
the program the performers and audience stood and sang 'The Star-Spangledi 
Banner' with right good will." 

April 27: University Dramatic Club Presents "Tlie Man of the Hour" 

On Saturday evening, April SYth, the University of ]S[ortli Carolina 
Dramatic Club presented "The Man of the Hour/' a four-act drama 
by George Broadhurst, in the St. Mary's Auditorium. The Dramatic 
Club production was especially interesting this year as the Co-eds 
made their first appearance, and with Elizabeth Lay as "leading 
lady." Elizabeth Lay is the daughter of the Rector and graduated 
from St. Mary's in 1915, going to the University in 1916. "The 
Man of the Hour" is the best play the Dramatic Club has produced in 
many years and won great favor with the St. Mary's audience. The 
parts were well taken, the dramatic effects cleverly managed, and the 
production altogether a happy success. 

The News and Observer said in detail: 

"On Saturday evening, in St. Mary's Auditorium, before a large and appre- 
ciative audience, the University of North Carolina Dramatic Club presented 
'The Manof the Hour,' a four-act drama by George Broadhurst. 

"The play, though serious in theme, was replete with comedy, and the full- 
est measure of success crowned the evening. Indeed, the play may be ac- 
counted as the best ever presented by the University Dramatic Club. 

"TTiere was an absence of stiffness in the acting, and the enunciation of 
each member of the cast was clear and distinct. 

"Much interest centered in the three young ladies who represented the 
'Co-eds' for the first time in a production by the Dramatic Club. Miss Eliza- 
beth Lay, a graduate of St. Mary's School and daughter of the Rector, was 
both graceful and charming in the role of 'Dallas Wainwright,' the heroine, 
and received much enthusiastic applause. 

"Miss Virginia McFadyen as 'Cynthia Garrison' was natural and unassum- 
ing, while Miss Marian Wilcox portrayed the character of 'Mrs. Bennett,' the 
mother, with much sweetness and sympathy. 

"To Mr. J. Y. Jordan, Jr., who played the title role, great credit is due. He 
handled the several difficult dramatic situations with considerable skill. Mr. 
Jordan, as always in the Dramatic Club plays, showed keen understanding of 
his role, and carried his audience with him in sympathy and interest to the 
end. 



The Muse 19 

"Mr. A. Oettinger as 'James Phelan,' alderman of the Eighth. Ward, took the 
character part of the rough politician with much realism and skill. His 
opponent, Mr. F. J. Cohn as 'Richard Harrigan,' was splendid in his part. 

" 'Perry,' the jolly brother of the heroine, taken by Mr. B. L. Meredith, was 
very popular with his keen wit and easy handling of the part. 

"The leaders of the cast were well supported by the other members. All 
did their share in making the production of 'The Man of the Hour' an admira- 
ble one." 

April 29: Certificate Yoice Recital — 3Iary Foote Neal 

The first of the Certificate Eecitals of the season was given on April 
29th by Miss Mary Foote ISTeal, certificate pupil in Voice of Mr. 
Owen, who was assisted by Miss Mary Ray, cellist. 

The Neivs and Observer of the next day said : 

"The young singer was in good voice and sang with feeling and expression. 
Her quality of voice and variety of shading showed careful development and 
training. 

"The opening group was given with charm and appreciation. In the modern 
French group the singer was at her best, showing good enunciation and real 
feeling. In the English songs her voice was sweet, clear, and sympathetic. 

"Miss Neal was ably assisted by Miss Ray, cellist, who played with under- 
standing, interpretation, and well developed technique." 

The program was as follows : 

I. 

(a) Le Violette A. Scarlatti (1659-1725) 

(6) Jeune Fillette Nicholas Dalayrac (1735-1809) 

(c) Tom Tinker's My True Love Old English 

II. 

(a) Te Souviens-Tu? Benjamin Godard (1849-1895) 

(6) Mai Raynaldo Hahn (1875-) 

III. 

Aria — "Ah, Rendimi," from "Mitrane" 

Francesco Rossi (Henriette Sontag) (1806-'54) 

IV. 

(a) Melody Moussorgsky (1839-'81) 

{&) Harlequin Popper (1845-) 

Miss Maby Ray 



20 The Muse 

V. 

(a) Love's Anguish Mary Helen Brown 

(&) The Star James H. Rogers (1857-) 

(c) Since We Parted Frances AlUtson (1849-1912) 

(d) Patria C. Whitney Coombs (1859-) 

May 2: Pupils' Recital in Expression 

Miss Davis presented lier pupils in an unusually attractive pro- 
gram at the Thursday afternoon Recital on May 2d, and those taking 
part won even more than usual applause. Dorothy Kirtland in the 
character part of "Cinders" did as good a piece of acting as has been 
seen at St. Mary's in many a day. 

The program included : 

"BILDS": A Faece in One Act 

Mr. S. R. Jones, a lawyer who stutters Jane Toy 

Mr. Jack Davis Beatrice Tubnek 

Mrs. Jack Davis Mary Hoke 

"CINDERS": A One- Act Comedy 

Jack Warrenton, a lawyer Ruth Russell 

Amelia Ann, otherwise "Cinders" Dorothy Kirtland 

May 4: Inter-Society Debate 

Each year a contest is held between the Epsilon Alpha Pi and the 
Sigma Lambda Literary Societies, taking either the form of a contest 
in writing or in a debate or series of debates. This year the contest 
took the form, first, of a debate, and, second, of writings produced in 
The Muse. 

On the evening of May 4th an eager crowd gathered in the Audi- 
torium for the annual debating contest. The audience was divided, 
the Sigma Lambdas sitting on the left and the Epsilon Alpha Pi mem- 
bers seated on the right, while the neutrals, only a few in number, and 
the judges occupied the center. The stage was attractively decorated 
with pennants and flowers and the air was filled with suspense. 

At eight o'clock the debaters with the Society presidents entered 
from their respective sides. Lucy London Anderson, '20, and Aline 



The Muse 21 

Hughes, '18, upheld the affirmative for the Sigma Lambda Society, 
while Ellen Lay, '19, and Millicent Blanton, '20, supported the nega- 
tive for the Epsilon Alpha Pi Society. 

The query for debate was: "Resolved, That immigration should 
be restricted by a literacy test." The first on the affirmative, Lucy 
London Anderson delivered a clear, concise argument, with splendid 
delivery and conviction. She was followed by Ellen Lay, first on the 
negative, who took up her side with an earnest and clear argTiment, 
presenting it in a pleasing and effective manner. ISText came Aline 
Hughes, second on the affirmative, who delivered her plea in her usual 
decisive and convincing manner. Last was Millicent Blanton, second 
on the negative, and perhaps the laurels go to her for oratory, for her 
argument and delivery showed a most careful selection of words, deep 
conviction, and a sense of personal confidence. The rebuttals were 
good, and as the audience rose to sing Alma Mater, awaiting the de- 
cision of the judges, there was an air of excitement and suspense over 
the house. 

All the papers were good, and it was judged by some who have wit- 
nessed the debates in former vears as one of the best ever given at 
St. Mary's. The judges rendered their decision in favor of the affirm- 
ative, giving the victory in the debating contest to the Sigma Lambda 
Literary Society. 

May 6: Certificate Piano Eecital — Dorothy Portlock Wood 

On Monday evening, May 6th, Dorothy Portlock Wood gave her 
Certificate Piano Recital in the Auditorium. The stage was beauti- 
fully decorated with roses, white and pink, and pink sweet peas. 
Dorothy Wood, ,who is a pupil of Miss Martha Dowd, played excep- 
tionally well, with much expression and delicacy of touch. The 
Chopin Etude and Polonaise showed great artistic ability and skillful 
execution. Perhaps the most surprisingly well played composition 
for such a young artist was "From Early Years" by Grieg. 

Anita Smith, soprano, assisted in the recital and pleased her audi- 
ence, as she always does, with her rich voice, full of expression. 



22 The Muse 

"Where Pond Lilies Grow" and ^'When Thou Commandest Me to 
Sing" were very popular with the audience. 
The program was as follows : 

I 

(a) "Capriccio," from Sonata in F Scarlatti-Tausig 

(6) "Bourree," from 4th Sonata for 'Cello BacJi-Tours 

II 
Auf scliwung, Op. 12 Schumann 

III 

(a) Etude, Op. 25, No. 9 ) ^^^^^^ 

(&) Polonaise, Op. 26, No. ( 

IV 

Eyes That Are Like Desert Fires Siemown 

Where Pond Lilies Gleam Barker 

When Thou Commandest Me to Sing Hammond 

Miss A>^ita Smith 

V 
From Early Years, Op. 65; No. 1 Grieg 

VI 

Marche Mignonne Poldini 

*Danse Andalouse, from "Orientales" "^ 

Shadow Dance • l MacDowell 

Witches' Dance j 

*Sous I'arhee, a sole et I'oranger , 
Dansaient les brunes Andalouses 

(Victor Hugo, "Les Orientales") 

May 9: Alnmnee Day — St. Mary's 76th Birthday 

As Alumnae Day, May 12th, this year fell on Sunday, the annual 
celebration was held on Thursday, May 9th, Ascension Day. Cele^ 
bration of the Holy Communion was held at the 11 o'clock service in 
the Chapel, at which many Raleigh alumnffi were present. Dr. Lay's 
sermon was especially appropriate to the day and the anniversary of 
the School. 

As has been the annual custom, the alumnse luncheon was held in 
the School dining room at 1 :15, and there were about sixty of the 
Raleigh alumnse as guests for the day. The Rector extended a cordial 
welcome to the alumnse, and was followed by Katharine Drane, presi- 



The ITrsE 23 

dent of tlie Senior Class, wlio told something of the war work of the 
St. Mary's girls at the School. Miss Susan Iden, chairman of the 
Raleigh Chapter, responded in behalf of the alumnEe. 

The annual business meeting of the Kaleigh Alumna was held in 
the Parlor immediately after the luncheon. Mrs. J. J. Bernard was 
elected chairman for the ensuing year, with Miss Isabel Busbee as 
vice-chairman. Mrs. J. B. Cheshire, Jr., secretary, and Miss Lizzie 
Lee, treasurer, were reelected. Miss Elizabeth Holman and Mrs. 
A. W. Knox were added to the members of the Council. 

Then followed the May Festival in the Grove. The audience gath- 
ered under the trees around the throne of the May Queen while the 
performers in a gTaceful winding procession entered from beyond 
West Eock, the heralds leading, followed by the Queen and her court. 
The May Queen (Katherine Drane) was escorted to her throne, after 
which a wee fairy (Hilda Martin of the Primary Department) pre- 
sented her with her cro\\m of flowers, and her scepter, which had been 
carried by little Susie May Bobbins. Then came a song of welcome 
to springtime, followed by a wreath dance in which the small dancers 
of the Primary Department made their first appearance in aesthetic 
dancing. Then the court ladies and gallants danced before the Queen 
in the dainty minuet. 

The second part of the May Day program consisted of various 
dances and drills. Miss Mabel Barton danced with her class in the 
''Sari" and ''Wild Bird." A gTOup of national dances were most 
attractive — a Scotch Reel, Irish Lilt and Oxdansen, then the Ameri- 
can Girl, and Spanish dance. The flag drill concluded the program 
with the singing of the Star-Spangled Banner at the end. This drill 
was one of the prettiest and most effective events of the festival. A 
great deal of credit is due Miss Mabel Barton for the success of the 
May Day, for it was under her direction that the Physical Training 
Department gave the performance. She trained the performers and 
planned the costumes and setting, all with her usual enthusiasm and 
ability. 

The program for Alumnae Day was concluded by a music recital in 
the Auditorium given by the music pupils under the direction of Mr. 
Owen, which was greatly enjoyed. H. 



24 The Muse 



May 11: Junior-Senior Party 

On Saturday, May 11th, the Juniors planned to continue the series 
of annual "Junior-Senior Banquets," which have heen a choice bright 
spot in the student life of the two upper classes in recent years, with 
a modest "party." They chose the Grove to the east of the Audi- 
torium as the scene, and no prettier one could be found, and they 
counted on May weather to do the rest — and the May weather did it. 
Seven-thirty found all arrangements made and the hostesses in happy 
expectation of the arrival of their guests, for of course the wind and 
the clouds would "away" before the hour, but, alas ! it proved not so. 
The wind blew on and decorations and tables fell before it. 

But it is a poor cloud that has no silver lining, and the adversity 
gave the Juniors their chance to show their versatility, for they 
quickly moved into the Auditorium ahead of the rain, and while the 
guests probably found the arrangements slightly less formal than they 
might have been, and may have regarded it as a little unusual to have 
a garden party with Japanese lanterns and floral arbors overhead 
under a roof, still the spirit of the occasion was not dampened, and the 
music within attuned well with the music of the rain outside. 

The Juniors' Song of Greeting to the Seniors, written by Polly 
Freeman, was catchy and effective ; Ellen Lay read an original letter 
from Ruth Gebert( ?), ex-member of the Senior Class, which seemed 
to show her well posted about the Senior affairs of the year; and a 
series of novel tableaux-recitations reviewing the year and later form- 
ing the basis of a part of the program for the School Party were done 
effectively. Dr. Lay, "Miss Katie," Aline Hughes for the Seniors, 
and ]^ina Burke, the president, for the Juniors, gave brief toasts, and 
the signal for dispersal came with "Alma Mater." 

May 12: Mr. Panl Sliimmon Addresses the School in Behalf of the Armenian 
and Assyrian Eelief Funds 

On Sunday, May 12th, we had the very great pleasure of having 
with us Mr. Paul Shimmon, as a guest at the School. He is a per- 
sonal representative of Mar Shimmon, Eastern Patriarch, a recent 
martyr to the cause of Christianity under the Turkish imposition. 



The Muse 25 

At Dr. Lay's request, he graciously consented to address the students 
in the schoolroom immediately after dinner, as those at the School 
had not had the good fortune of hearing him in his morning address 
at Christ Church. 

Though speaking with an Eastern accent, Mr. Shimmon's manner 
is decidedly forceful and pleasing. He spoke of the great pleasure it 
was to visit St. Mary's, the largest Church school for girls in this 
country, and to know that a group of St. Mary's girls of Raleigh had 
organized the work of raising an Armenian and Assyrian Relief Fund 
in the city, in which the Rector's daughters have taken an active 
part, ISTancy Lay being the leader. 

After a description of the locality and biblical setting of his coun- 
try, Assyria, Mr. Shimmon gave many viyid pictures of the struggles 
of the Christians in that country and those surrounding it, of the suf- 
fering, destruction, and desolation there at the hands of the Turks 
and Kurds. In the town of Urumi a little group of American mis- 
sionaries, under the American flag, the only one which the Turks 
were afraid to harm, banded together the remnants of Assyrians from 
the country about, while the Russian soldiers fled, the English and 
Erench people withdrew, and so warded off the complete dispersion 
of the Assyrians during the enemy invasions. It was of this brave 
town and little American band that Mr. Shimmon spoke chiefly, tell- 
ing of their troubles and suffering. Stricken with typhoid, their 
number was thinned out by dozens. Hundreds of Assyrians in the 
country about died of starvation, homeless, and often driven into the 
desert to perish at the hands of the enemy. Both the Turks and 
Kurds committed unspeakable crimes against these people. 

There is a hope, a great hope, as the British under Allenby push on 
north of Jerusalem towards ISTazareth, the town where our Lord spent 
His youth. Those British soldiers are fighting in the great cause of 
right against might, and the end must be a victorious end. 

In conclusion, after he had been applauded back to the platform to 
the cry of "Tell us some more!" from the girls, Mr. Shimmon made 
an urgent plea for the girls to think of their sisters over in the East, 
starving and without clothes to cover themselves, to support with 
might and main the Armenian and Assyrian Relief Fund, to give 



20 The Muse 

those people food, many of tliem now living on garbage in the streets, 
watermelon rinds and such. 

It is needless to add that Mr. Shimmon's appeal struck home to the 
heart of the St. Mary's girls, and we owe him a debt of gratitude for 
bringing the matter closer to us by his personal experiences and the 
plea of an eye-witness for our help in the tremendous needs of his 
people. 

May 13: Expression Certificate Recital — ^Alice Creswell Seed 

The first Expression Recital of the year was given in the Audi- 
torium on the evening of Monday, May 13th, by Alice Seed, certifi- 
cate pupil of Miss Florence Davis, assisted by Anita Smith. 

The News and Observer of the following day said: 

"Miss Alice Seed, an Expression pupil of Miss Florence Davis of the St. 
Mary's Expression Department, gave a Certificate Recital in the School Audi- 
torium on Monday night. She was ably assisted by Miss Anita Smith, soprano, 
with Mr. R. Blinn Owen as accompanist. Miss Smith, a popular singer at 
St. Mary's, sang in her usual manner. 

"Miss Seed has a natural charm and grace on the stage, as well as a most 
pleasing delivery. She rendered each selection, with their varied character 
portrayals, skillfully and well. Her first selection, 'The Star-Spangled Ban- 
ner,' by Mary Raymond Shipman Andrews, was handled with unusual ability. 
'The Troubles of Lazarus Abrahamovitch' was the second number, and the 
little fellow's troubles were disclosed with much realism. A group of war 
poems by Robert W. Service, filled with pathos and beauty, were rendered 
with skill and feeling. The final happy selection, 'Playing With Fire,' by 
Percival Wilde, was most creditably rendered. The program was brief, well 
balanced, and most delightful. Miss Seed shows talent and excellent training 
in the work." 

May 16: Campaign for "Second Red Cross War Fund" 

The week of May 20th was set for the country-wide campaign to 
raise $100,000,000 for the Second Red Cross War Fund to support 
the Red Cross work in the war for the coming year. 

On Thursday morning, May 16, a committee was called together in 
The Muse room to make plans for a one-day campaign at St. Mary's. 
It was decided to finish the matter up that day, spread the word of the 
campaign through the School, ask for volunteer contributors to start 



The Muse 27 

tlie fund off, make a canvass of the Faculty, and wind up with a meet- 
ing of the entire School that night, where the pledges would be com- 
pleted. It was hoped to raise a fund of $250, the Faculty contribu- 
ting $50 and the girls perhaps $200. 

From eight-thirty on Thursday morning until six o'clock that night 
the canvassers were busily engaged in spreading the news and calling 
for volunteer subscribers as a starter for the evening meeting. A 
full canvass of the Faculty and officers was made, ending in a 100- 
per-eent contribution. After a further committee meeting at six 
o'clock, where reports gave every promise of success, the big meeting 
was held at seven-fifteen. Judge Winston had graciously consented 
to give a five-minute address on the work of the Red Cross and pur- 
pose of the fund. His talk was most interesting and inspiring and 
met with a storm of applause. At its conclusion, Marian Drane took 
the platform as chairman, and Louise Pearsall conducted the meeting 
with full pep and enthusiasm, while the committee called out the con- 
tributions from among the students. They came in fast and vigor- 
ously. When the last contribution was called, the meeting dispersed 
while the committee gathered to determine the result, which was to 
be announced at nine-thirty. But in about fifteen minutes the result 
was spreading like wildfire through the School and Grove. Five 
hundred dollars had been raised among the students and $166 from 
the Faculty and ofiicers, a total of $666. 

The spirit and enthusiasm with which St. Mary's received the Red 
Cross campaign resulted in a 100-per-cent offering from the 100-per- 
cent Red Cross membership of the School, and a sum which far out- 
ran our highest expectations. 

May 18: The Seventh "School Party" 

The Seventh Annual School Party was held at the usual time, on 
Saturday, May 18th, and was a great success. The Parlor was 
prettily decorated, as in the past, with the class colors in streamers, 
with the School colors joining them, and, this year, all surmounted 
with streamers of the Red, White, and Blue. 

The seating arrangement was as on similar occasions in the past, 
and, after the Faculty had taken their seats, the procession of the 



28 The Muse 

classes entered, with the ''Preps" leading, all singing "In a Grove of 
Stately Oak Trees." Katharine Drane, president of the Class of 
1918, spoke the welcome and announced that the lower classes, as 
usual, would respond in turn with a word of greeting and their class 
song. In the absence of l!^ina Burke, Junior president, who had been 
hurt in the basket-ball game in the afternoon, Mildred Kirtland said 
a word for the Juniors, who sang ''Come, Gather Together, You 
Juniors," reminiscent of the Second School Party. Helen Battle, 
the president, spoke for the Sophomores, who sang a new song to the 
tune of "Comin' Through the Rye." Eainsford Glass, Freshman 
president, spoke for her class, who sang Mr. Hodgson's old song, 
"We're a Jolly Band of Freshmen." Anita Smith, president of the 
"Preps," made a feeling speech for them, and then to the tune of 
"Bangor" they sang their new song, which was very effective. The 
Seniors then concluded this part of the program with "O Gee, O Gee," 
another of Mr. Hodgson's songs. 

The special feature of the program was a review of some of th6 
more remembered parts of the happenings of the year, presented by 
tableaux with song or recitation accompanying. This part of the 
program was as follows : 

1. Introduction (Recitation) Mary C. Wilson, '19 

2. A Pall Industry (Knitting) 

"Knit, Knit, Knit" (Song) 

Ella Pender, Mary Neal, and Anita Smith 

3. Uncle Sam's Call (The Liberty Loans) 

"What Are You Going to Do to Help the Boys?" (Song) 

HiLAH Taewater and Chorus 

4. Seclusion — i. e., The West Rock Quarantine (Recitation) 

Mary Yellott 

5. Travel — The Delegates to Elon (Tableaux) 

Elizabeth Browne and Helen Battle 

6. Food Conservation (Song) 

"Oh Where, Oh Where Has My White Roll Gone?" 

Ella Pender 

7. War Gardening (Recitation) 

"Miss Turnip" Alice Seed 



The Muse 29 

8. War Saving (Recitation) 

"Tie Little Thrift Stamp" Rebecca Baxter 

9. "Clean Up" (Recitation, with Mower Accompaniment) 

Dorothy Kirtland 

10. The Red Cross Work 

Tableaux — Red Cross Worker Jaxe Ruffin 

Recitation Millicext Blanton 

11. An Unusual Anniversary (B. Folk, 1908-1918) (Recitation) 

Alice Seed 

12. Summary (Song) 

"Help Things Along" Ella Pender and Chorus 

At tlie conclusion of these Glimpses at the Year, the toasts were 
given by the class, Bessie Folk toasting the School, Estelle Ravenel 
the Faculty, Helen Laughinghouse the Rector, Agnes Pratt "Our 
Lady Principal," Aline Hughes "Miss Katie," and Katharine Drane 
"Our Class Adviser — Mr. Stone." Suitable responses were given. 

After simple refreshments of ice-cream, the final scenes in the 
party were entered on in the singing of the farewell songs. "Good- 
lye, School," followed "Goodbye, 1918." Then, led by the Chorus, 
all joined in a hearty rendition of Mr. Owen's "Hail to Our Boys in 
France," "Alma Mater" was sung, and with "The Star-Spangled 
Banner" the assembly dissolved. 

May 22: "Ducky's" Annual Party 

On the hot afternoon of May 22d, "Old Ducky," one of the dearest 
St. Mary's landmarks, gave her annual party to the girls of her hall 
and tables in the dining room, as well as inviting many other fortu- 
nate favorites. It was held in the cool shade on the lawn by the Audi- 
torium. "Ducky" appeared in a fresh cap and apron, looking her 
prettiest, and helped serve the delicious ice cream and cake which she 
had helped to make. During the course of the party she had to 
recite her well-known pieces and sing several songs, all of which have 
become familiar to the St. Mary's girls of many years, for "Ducky" 
is most gracious in sharing her talents anywhere she may be stopped 
along the byways by a crowd eager for a song. Our hostess was much 



30 The Muse 

pleased with the little toast given by Mary Yellott, the School poet, in 
the following words : 



A toast to little Ducky! 

Come, raise your glasses high. 
There are no glasses and no wine? 

Oh, we should worry! Why, 
If we can't drink a toast to her, 

What difference does it make? 
Come, eat a toast to Ducky 

With good ice-cream and cake. 



H.B. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Subicription Price ,,,,,,, ^ , One Dollar 

Single Copies -' - Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published montlily except in July and August at St. Mary's 
School, Raleigh, N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnas, under the 
editorial management of the Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF, 1917-1918 
Aline E. Hughes, '18, Editor-in-Chief 

SENIOR REPORTERS 

Katharine P. Dbane, '18 Elizabeth MoM. Folk, '18 

junior reporters 
Helen Van W. Battle, '20 Ellen Lay, '19 

Mildred Kirtland, '20 Alice Seed, '20 

Agnes T. Pratt, '18, Business Manager 

Mary C. Wilson, '20, -, 

Louise Toler, '19, | '^^^'^^^ant Business Managers 



The Muse CoQtest 

This year, instead of the editors of The Muse having to gather the 
literary material for the monthly Muse, it was decided to have the 
two Literary Societies produce this material under the direction of 
two associate editors from each society. To add interest and to make 
the competition more keen, it was decided to make the Literary De- 
partment of The Muse a contest between the E. A. P. and Sig-ma 
Lambda Societies, and as the second feature of the year's contest of 
work between them. Each society was to produce a number of 
Muses equal to that of the other. This number of The Muse is the 
third issued by the E. A. P.'s, and now each society has had two single 
numbers and one double number. 



32 The Muse 

The decision of the judges, who will weigh the kind, quality, and 
quantity of material, prose and verse, will be rendered at the Class 
Day exercises. 

The Sigma Lambda Society won the first part of the annual contest, 
being victorious in the debate. 



The Red Cross Drive 

It requires only the right cause and its proper presentation to get 
results from people anywhere, and St. Mary's girls are always ready 
to give a demonstration of the fact. 

St. Mary's is proud of its Red Cross record this year, and with 
100-per-cent membership in the organization it is natural that every- 
one should feel a deep interest in all that concerns the Red Cross, and 
while the purpose of the Second Red Cross War Fund ensured its 
appeal to every American, the appointed time — the week of May 20- 
25 — coming at the fag end of a strenuous year, a year of many 
appeals and ready responses, made it a little doubtful as to just 
how much could be done, with everyone doing her part and yet no 
one allowed to overdo. 

So Thursday, May 16th, was a memorable day in student life at 
St. Mary's. Never was a better cause, but also never was there more 
spontaneous and more real cooperation and enthusiasm from both 
girls and teachers in any matter of common interest. Enthusiasm 
plus organization told once more, and with an aim of $250, the 
pledges — and all of them from the heart — totalled $666, with every 
teacher and officer and every student contributing. The amount mat- 
ters little, the spirit amounts to much. May we ever be able to make 
as good a showing in matters worth while ! 

The Red Cross officers — Marian Drane, Louise Toler, Mildred 
Kirtland, Eleanor Sublett, and Miss Lee^ — invited Louise Pearsall, 
Jane Ruffin, Ellen Lay, Miss Margaret Bottum, and Miss Agnes Bar- 
ton to act with them in covering the School in a one-day campaign, 
and the results exceeded all anticipation. 



The Muse 33 

Plans were made after breakfast, Mr. Cruikshank spoke to the 
girls in morning assembly, Judge Winston made a vigorous five- 
minute talk at the opening of the specially called School meeting at 
night, Louise Pearsall appealed for the individual gifts and, acting 
as crier, managed the meeting very effectively, and in fifteen minutes 
every member of the School had made her pledge. But this bare 
statement of the evident facts takes no account of the very enthusi- 
astic work of the committee throughout the day in preparation for the 
meeting, or of the very cordial cooperation of everybody in respond- 
ing to their efforts. Judge Winston was the link between the Raleigh 
campaign, the big work outside, and St. Mary's part in it. He spoke 
on just the right lines and in just the right time, after a happy intro- 
duction by Miss Hester; but no speech was necessary to bring the 
results. The girls had assured the result by the spirit of their 
responses throughout the day. Especially effective and contagious 
was the enthusiastic work of Miss Bottum and Miss Barton, and 
teachers and girls vied with each other in interest. 

What the Raleigh Campaign Committee thought of St. Mary's part 
is shown in an appreciative letter from Mr. R. D. W. Connor, who 
was the War Fund Chairman and played a great part in the great 
success of the local campaign, for on Tuesday, May 21st, the Raleigh 
workers made their canvass and went "over the top" of their allotted 
quota of $30,000 by several thousand dollars. 

Mr. Connor writes : 

Of course the Red Cross knew that St. Mary's would do something splendid, 
but even the most enthusiastic of us did not anticipate such a magnificent 
contribution as the teachers and girls actually made. 

I wish you would express to both the faculty and the students my very deep 
appreciation of their generous contribution. I wish we had many other 100% 
Red Cross institutions in the State, moved by the same enthusiastic spirit as 
St. Mary's. 
With sincerest thanks to all for your cooperation, 

I am, very sincerely yours, 

R. D. W. Connor, 
Chapter War Fund Chairman. 

E. C. 



34 The Muse 



The "School Party" 

The Seventh "School Party" seemed to be an especially happy 
affair, with everyone entering into the occasion and not the least jar- 
ring note to mar the concord. The note of patriotism was dominant, 
and the thought of loyalty for School and devotion to the country were 
mingled. The classes with their simple but very effective costumes 
and full of the spirit of the occasion, the tableaux with their accom- 
paniment of song or recitation, calling attention to striking points in 
the student life of the year, the toasts, the "good-bye" songs, and the 
spirited singing of Mr, Owen's new patriotic song, "Hail to the Boys 
in France !" and of the Star-Spangled Banner, all combined to make 
the evening one well worthy of memory. 

Of course the honors belong to the Class of 1918, all the members 
of which joined to make the occasion maintain the standard of like 
evenings in the past. Katharine Drane, the class president, did her 
double part with much credit, presiding in her usual pleasing manner 
and playing for all the songs. Ella Pender was the star in the "Cal- 
endar" program, with her very effective rendering of her topical 
songs, while the "Party" served to introduce Mary Yellott as a new 
School "poet," to follow in the lines of Annie Cameron and her 
predecessors. 

To those who have followed the "School Parties" from their start, 
they will always call to mind those who had so much to do with mak- 
ing them successful from the first — especially "Mr. Hodgson," who 
wrote so many of the School songs and took such interest in all such 
student affairs. Elizabeth Tarry, too, with her charm of personality 
and real musical gift, stands out in memory. But it may be well to 
preserve some record of the "Party" for the future by reproducing 
the remarks that Katharine Drane made at the beginning of the 
"Party" : 

"We are here together for the 'Seventh School Party. To us Seniors it is 
hoth a very happy and a sad occasion. It means to us the beginning of the 
culmination of our St. Mary's hopes and the beginning of the end of our 
happy St. Mary's days. 



The Muse 35 

"For the School Party is the "get together" meeting of the end of the school 
year. Coming as it does on the third Saturday before Commencement, it is 
the last of our St. Mary's gatherings which do not really belong to the Com- 
mencement season. Another week, and examinations and Commencement 
are all that are left to us of the school year. 

"But the one thought of us all tonight should be in the spirit of getting 
together and being together. Teachers and girls are here together to feel the 
St. Mary's spirit and to show the St. Mary's spirit. We Seniors have hadi 
pleasure in planning the party — for you and for St. Mary's; if you go away a 
wee bit more enthusiastic, a wee bit more devoted to things here, we shall be 
very happy. 

"Just a word of the history of the party. The First School Party was given 
in 1912 by the Freshman Class to the School. We are happy in still having 
with us two members of that class, our friends, Miss Margaret Bottum. who 
was the Freshman President, under whose inspiration the First School Party 
was given, and Miss Agnes Barton, who joined the class in its Junior year, 
when it gave the Third School Party. For the Class of 1915 was sponsor for 
the School Party during its four years, giving it in honor of the successive 
Senior Classes, and when its time came to graduate it turned over the party 
to succeeding Senior Classes. It was a trust which we are executing here 
tonight. 

"One further word as to the songs. Perhaps only a few of you know that 
the first of our School songs, Alma Mater, was written only thirteen years 
ago. In the years since, other songs have been added as occasion arose, until 
we now have more than twenty-five distinct St. Mary's songs. Most of them, 
including Alma Mater and In a Grove of Stately Oak Trees, have their words 
written to familiar old tunes in order that they may be the more readily 
remembered). Some of them are distinctive in both words and tunes. In- 
stead of getting up new songs, the Senior, Juniors, and FVeshmen are going 
to use tonight songs from former School Parties, which are not as familiar as 
we would like them to be to the St. Mary's girls of the present. If we sing 
rather too much than too well in this Party, we apologize in advance. 

"It is a great pleasure to us to have you all here." 

E.G. 



36 The Muse 



Hail to the Boys io praQce! 

Mr. E. Blinn Owen has composed a patriotic song for the Chorus 
Class of this year, and at his request Aline Hughes has written the 
words. It goes with a swing and has met with a warm reception. 
The song was sung first to the School at the School Party, and was 
presented to the public at the Annual Chorus Concert on May 25th. 

These are the words : 

For thee, America, our home, 
From palace and hut arise 
<xreat prayers of hope and love 
Unto the skies. 

We send our boys across the sea 
To strive for Freedom's dawn, 
For world-wide freedom they — will 
Carry on. 

Hail to our boys in France! 

Hail to the cause of right! 

We love and honor them — support 

The cause for which they fight. 

Hail, hail, America! 

However far they roam, 

Thy sons andi daughters honor thee, 

America, our home! 

On thee, America, our home, 
The hopes of the world now rest. 
May God grant that the world 
With peace be blest! 
Though we at home are far away, 
Their burden we would share. 
And give our all to help them 
Over there. 

Hail to our boys in France! etc. 



Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Cruikshank, Alumnse Editor 



St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

HoNORABT Presidext - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

HONORART Vice-Presidents - / ^"- ^- ^=K- ^ttinger, Raleigh. 

^ Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham. 
President _ _ _ _ Mrs. John H. Holmes, Chapel Hill. 

Vice-President _ _ _ Mrs. Walter Grimes, Raleigh. 

Secretart - - _ _ Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer _ _ _ _ Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 



The Alumnae Meeting and Luncheon 

An innovation will be introduced in the Commencement alumnse 
gathering this year, when the alumuEe meet at 1 o'clock on Monday, 
June 3d, at the Woman's Club in the city for an alumnse luncheon. 
The members of the graduating class will be the honor gaiests on the 
occasion. Every alumna is invited to attend the luncheon, and a good 
number is assured. 

Following the luncheon, the annual meeting of the AlumuEe Asso- 
ciation will be held at the Woman's Club. 

Mrs. Holmes, the president of the alumnse the past year, has been 
very active in advancing the interests of the Association, and largely 
through her efforts a number of the out-of-town chapters will have 
delegates present at Commencement and for the alumnse meeting. 



ST. /WARY'S SCHOOL FUND 



Good Progress — Asheville OQd East Carolina in Line 

The St. Mary's School Fund has made good progTess in the month 
of May. jSTot only has the Diocese of oSTorth Carolina raised two- 
thirds of its $75,000 quota, but the balance will surely come. Like- 
wise, the District of Asheville and the Diocese of East Carolina are 
organized for work. The Conventions of these Dioceses have ap- 



38 The Muse 



proved the plans of their respective committees and pledged their sup- 
port. The East Carolina campaign begins in June and the District 
of Asheville campaign begins in August. 

Feajstcis M. Osborne, 
Special Representative of the Board 
of Trustees of St. Mary's School. 



The AlumQae Day Raleigh Mcetiog 

The invitation of the Rector to the Raleigh alumnse to be the 
guests of the School at the Alumnse Day luncheon was, as always, 
accepted with much pleasure and deeply appreciated. About seventy 
of the alumnae gathered with the School at 1:15 on Thursday, May 
9th, Ascension Day, when the day was celebrated, since May 12th fell 
on a Sunday. 

The speechmaking following the luncheon was as brief as possible, 
and on leaving Clement Hall the regular meeting of the Raleigh 
Alumnse Chapter was held in the Parlor. At this meeting Mrs. J. J. 
Bernard was elected chairman for the coming year ; Miss Isabel Bus- 
bee, vice- chairman; Miss Elizabeth Holman and Mrs. A. W. Knox 
were elected to the Council, and Mrs. J. B. Cheshire, Jr., and Miss 
Lizzie Lee were reelected secretary and treasurer respectively. After 
the meeting, the alumnse were entertained by the Physical Training 
Department of the School in a program of May Day festivities and 
aesthetic dancing in the Grove, followed by a brief music recital in the 
Auditorium. 

At the luncheon, after the conclusion of the service. Dr. Lay wel- 
comed the alumnse in a brief speech, the special feature of which was 
his calling attention to the hanging of Dr. Aldert Smedes picture in 
the group of "four great schoolmasters" in the rooms of the Commis- 
sion on Religious Education at the Church Mission House. These 
four pictures were reproduced in The Churchman for April 27th, 
with a brief sketch of each man. 

After Dr. Lay's welcome. Miss Katharine Drane, president of the 
Senior Class, spoke for the students, and in conclusion Miss Susan 



The Muse 39 

Iden, chairman of the Ealeigh Chapter, responded for the alumnae in 
a gracious and graceful speech. 

Miss Drane took the opportunity to summarize for the visitors some 
of the special work that the girls have been doing during the year, 
work with which they might otherwise be unacquainted, and for the 
sake of others interested her remarks are reproduced here : 

"These annual alumnae luncheons are very pleasant occasions to us St. 
Mary's girls, and not the least pleasant feature of them is in having you 
our elder sisters with us. We hope that you enjoy being with us as we enjoy 
having you here. 

"You feel, we hope, a real interest in what is going on in St. Mary's and 
what we are doing and how worthy representatives we girls of todtay are 
proving ourselves to be. And we want you to know that we are trying to 
live up to the St. Mary's traditions of the past and do our full part in the call 
of the present. We know that you agree with us in feeling that our duty in 
the present lies in simplicity and service. We have been trying this year to 
do our regular work even a little better than usual — but in addition to our 
regular work well done, we have had much pride in doing what we could in 
the war-work that is so constantly in our minds and on our hearts. 

"We are proud of our Red Cross Auxiliary, with its work-room now regu- 
larly open, and of our 100-per-cent membership in the Red Cross; we are 
proud of our War Garden, in which some sixty of us are regularly working 
under the guidance of Miss Lee. and we think we deserve some credit for the 
response we have given to all the efforts at foodi conservation, for we have 
responded promptly and cheerfully; we are proud of our response to the 
Liberty Loan campaigns, in which we gave ?350 in Liberty Bonds to the En- 
dowment Fund of the School, and we hope that the end of the session will find 
us proud of our record in the Thrift Stamp and War Savings Stamps cam- 
paign, in which we are trying to save at least $1,000 by June. And we hope 
that you are proud of the looks of the Grove, which, in the present shortage 
of labor, some eighty of us have undertaken to keep in order. So you see we 
have been and are working. 

"And we are very glad, indeed, to welcome you here today, to see for 
yourselves." 



From far-off Wu Chang, China, comes "the Boone Bevlew, the stu- 
dent publication of Boone University, with request that The Muse 
exchange with it, a request with which The Muse is very glad to 
comply. 



40 The Muse 

Two St. Mary's girls who have recently started on long trips, inde- 
pendent of the war, are "Grace Whitaker" (1903-'06) and Constance 
Stammers (1914-'15). Miss Whitaker, whose old home was Wins- 
ton-Salem, married Mr. Ery Kehaya, who has large tobacco interests, 
and they make their home in I^ew York City. In February they 
sailed from San Francisco for Japan, stopping enroute at Honolulu. 
They expect to spend three months in Japan, China, and Korea. 
Constance Stammers, whose home is on Long Island, sailed in Apri 
with her father, who is a mining engineer, for India, and expects to 
be there for two years or more in the vicinity of Calcutta, where her 
father's work lies. 



Alumnae Weddings 

Harris-Vose: On Saturday, January 5th, in Grace Church, Chicago, Mary 
Ann Vose (S.M.S. 1912-'13), of Macomb, 111., and Mr. Henry Hickman 
Harris II. 

Gould-Wood: On Wednesday, March 20th, at Brunswick, Ga., Clara Wood 
(S.M.S. 1911-'12) and Mr. James Dunn Gould, Jr., First Lieutenant, 328th 
Infantry, U. S. N. A. 

Owen-Harris: On Wednesday, June 5th, in the Methodist Protestant Church, 
Henderson, N. C, Helen Franklin Harris (S.M.S. 1910-'ll) and Mr. Ran- 
dolph Maynard Owen. At home: "Buck Hill," Richmond, Va. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Patronize those who patronize you. Remember that it is 
the advertisers who make the publication of the Muse 
possible. 

DON'T FORGET 

TAYLOR'S 

206-JO MASONIC TEMPLE 

KING^CROWELL'S DKUG STORE 

and SODA FOUNTAIN 

COPvNER FAYETTEVILLE and HARGETT STREETS 



Success in the Campaign for the Raising of the $250,000 
Fund to pay off the debt and provide additional new build- 
ings, and the beginning of an Endowment Fund is of the 
utmost importance to St. Mary's. 

Think of it, talk of it, and help in every way you can. 



B. W. JONES 

The 
Best in 
Groceries 

Phones 667-668 528 Hillsboro Street 



'You get them when promised" 

llortoh s Studio 

Masonic Temple 

"Workers in Artistic Photography' 



Advertisements 



St, Mary's Girls Always Welcome at 

Hudson-Belk Company 

Full line of Ready-to-wear, Hosiery, Gloves, Furnishings, Dry 
Goods, Shoes, Toilet Goods, Ribbons and Laces 



ESTABLISHED 1858 

H. MAHLER'S SONS 


BOYLAN-PEARGE 

COMPANY 


JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 


The Greatest Store 
in the City for the 

SCHOOL GIRLS 


M. ROSENTHAL & COMPANY 

GROCERS 

Wilmington and Hargett Streets 


SEE 

HERBERT ROSENTHAL 

FOR REAL SHOES 



CAMOUFLAGE ON THE FARM 

The honest farmer's apple crop 
Has been dispatched to town. 
The barrels look this way on top: 

ooooooooooooo 

And this is lower down: 

ooooooooooooo 

— Selected. 



Why Is 

Brantley's Fountain 

the 

MOST POPULAR? 

Ask the Girls 



MARRIAGE INVITATIONS AND 
VISITING CARDS 

CORRECTLY and PROMPTLY ENORAYED 

Send for samples and prices 

Edwards & Broyghton Printing 
Company 

Steel Die and Copper Plate EngraTert 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Adveetisements 



HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
THE WAKE DRUG STOEE 

Phones 228 



HICKS' UPTOWN DRUG STORE 

Phone 107 
PROMPT DELIVERY 



Thomas H. Briggs & Sons 

he Big Hardware Men Raleigh, N. C. 



Base Balls, Basket Balls 
Tennis and Sporting Goods 



laleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets. 

PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 

12 W. Hargett St. 

RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 



Call OLIVE'S BAGGAGE TRANSFER 

Phone 529 

DARNELL & THOMAS 

ONE-PRICE MUSIC HOUSE 

T. F. BROCKWELL 

AU Kinds of Keys. Bicycle Supplies. 

Tj'pewriters of all Kinds Repaired. 



Hush, little Thrift Stamp, 

Don't you cry; 
You'll he a war hond 

Bye and bye. 

— Selected. 



Stationery, College Linen, Pennants, 
Cameras and Supplies 
Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 

JAMES E.THIEM 



Bell Phone 135 



RALEIGH, N. 0. 



CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE 

FINB CANDIES PURE ICE CREAM 
FRUIT 

We carry the most complete line of Fruit and 

Candies in town. 

Ill FAYET^TEVILLE STREET 



JOHNSON & JOHNSON CO. 

Coal, Wood, Ice, Brick 

122 Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. 0. 

H. STEINMETZ— FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 
Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



Phone 113 



CAROLINA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light and 

Power and Gas 

1376— BOTH PHONES— 1377 



WALK-OVER— The Shoe for You 
Walk-Over Shoe Shop 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



S. GLASS The Ladies' Store 

Everything up-to-date for Ladies, Misses 

and Children. Ready-made wearing apparel 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleioh, N. 0. 



Wm. Heller 

THE FOOTERY SHOP 

RALEIGH, N, C. 



Adveetisements 



THE FASHION 

KAPLAN BROS. CO. 
The college girls' store for Snappy, Classy, 
Youthful Garments and Millinery. 



TEN PER CENT DISCOUNT TO COLLEGE 
STUDENTS AND TEACHERS 



ORDER YOUR CUT FLOWERS 

FROM 

J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Phone 149 



" c^r^ eO' 




J Exclusive 
\ Millinery 



RALCIGH M.C 



WHITE ICE CREAM CO. 

BEST 
ICE CREAM 

Phone 123 

WILMINGTON STREET 



Their meeting it was sudden. 

Their meeting it was sad; 
She gave away her bright young life — 

The only one she had. 
And there beneath the willows 

Is where she's lying now: 
For there's always something doing 

When a freight train meets a cow! 

— Selected. 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company Home Capital 
Safe Secure and Successful 


Insure Against Loss by Fire 

Best Companies Represented. Bonding Solicitec 

Charles E. Johnson, Jr. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


OHAS. E. JOHNSON, President 

A. A. THOMPSON, Treasurer 

R. S. BUSBEE. Secretary 


HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
SHOES AND HOSIERY 


C. D. ARTHUR City Marke 
FISH AND OYSTERS 


WATSON PICTURE AND ART CO. 

Picture Frames and Window Shades. 


SHOES! WHOSE? 
BERNARD L. CROCKER 

124 Payetteville Street 


ELLINGTON'S ART STORE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
Collegre Pennants, Pillows, Pictures, 
Frames, Novelties 


GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 
Fire Insurance 


EOYSTER'S CANDY A SPECIALTl 

Made Fresh Every Day 



Advertisements 



THE YARBOROUGH 



Raleigh's Leading and Largest Hotel 
dinners and Banqnets a Specialty B. H. Griffin Hotel Co., Proprietors 



lolly & Wynne Jewelry Cg. 



COLLEGE 
JEWELRY 



L28 Fayetteville St. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



YOUJfG & HUGHES 



Plninbers 

Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating 



S. Wilmington Street 



"I don't like your heart action," the doctor said, applying the stethoscope 
again. "You have had some trouhle with angina pectoris." 

"You are mighty right, doctor," said the young man, sheepishly, "only that 
ain't her name." — Selected. 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



Premier Carrier of the South 



Most Direct Line to all Points North, South, 
East, West 



Through sleeping cars to all principal cities, through Tourist Cars 
to San Francisco and other California points. All-year tourist 
tickets on sale to principal Western points. Convenient local, as well 
as through trains. Electrically lighted coaches. Complete Dining 
Car Service on all through trains. Ask representatives of Southern 
Railway about special rates account Christmas holidays; also about 
various other special occasions. If you are contemplating a trip to 
any point, communicate with representatives of Southern Railway 
before completing your arrangements for same. They will gladly 
and courteously furnish you with all information as to the cheapest 
and most comfortable way in which to make the trip. Willi also be 
glad to secure Pullman Sleeping Car reservations for you 



H. F. CARY, General Pass. Agent, 
Washington, D. C. 



J. O. JONES, Traveling Pass. Agent, 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Adveetisements 



Hafapette 



A Cafe which inTites the patronaere of ladiea. The girls of St. Mary's will enjo 
the beauty and conrenience of oar modem, well-appointed dining- place. 

Fayetteville Street, next to Almo. 



See us for PORCH FURNITURE 
Royall & Borden Furniture Co. 

FAYETTEVILLE, STREET 



Patronize 

STAUDT'S BAKERY 

Hillsboro Street, Near St. Mary's 

School 



Teacher: "What is lyrical poetry?" 

Pupil: "Poetry originally sung by a liar." — Selected. 



PEEEY'S AET STOEE 

S. Wilmington St. 



MOORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 
104 EAST HARGETT ST. Bell Phone 719 

MISSES REESE & COMPANY 
MILLINERY 

BATES-ARRINGTON & COMPANY 
PURE FOOD GROCERIES 



WORK CALLED FOR AND DELIVERED 
BELL PHONE 503 
SHU-FIXKRY ] 

J. R. REE. Manager 103 Fayetteville St. 

RALEIGH. N. C. ! 

Shoes repaired while you wait. 

Come to see our modern plant 



L. SCHWARTZ 
RICHMOND MAEKET 

Meats of All Kinds 



Norfolk Southern Railroa 

ROUTE OF THK "NIGHT EXPRESS" 

Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

DIRECT LINE BETWEEN 



NORFOLK 



RALEIGH 

NEW BERN 

GOLDSBORO 



Via WASHINGTON, KINSTON, GREENVILLE, FARMVILLE 
AND WILSON, TO POINTS NORTH AND SOUTH 

Electric Lighted Pullman Sleeping and Parlor Cars 



Fast Schedule, Best Service 



Double Daily Express Seryice